2019 Solstice Share

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
SOLSTICE SHARE
Dec. 21, 2019

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com

HAPPY SOLSTICE, EVERYONE!
Thank you for joining our Solstice Share to celebrate the return of the light with good cheer and good health for the New Year.  We are proud to share this collaboration of the Brinery, Garden Works, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, and NOKA Homestead for this unique collaborative Solstice celebration, so please find ways to support them through their many locations as well.  Through this cooperative spirit we embrace the euphoria of this moment to provide you with winter sustenance of these nutritionally dense roots and storage vegetables.  We hope this food will contribute to a happy, healthy feast for you and your family.  

The all-day twilight of our mid-December days have been filled with sorting squash and storage roots in our moist, cool, root cellar basement.  This time has afforded us with many hours of time to share with one another on the farm.  From the wee hours in the early morning until the dusky hours of late afternoon we share in work and friendship with a midday break of a good, hearty, plant-based meal for lunch.  As this year comes to an end, we will wish farewell to all who have been a good supportive community in body and mind for our harvest together.

We will be distributing our Tantre vegetables in a 1 3/4-bushel wooden crate and our partner’s items will be in our half-bushel summer share box.  It might be helpful to bring some extra bags, boxes, or baskets, if you don’t want to bring the box and crate home. You can keep the box or return it at a later date to the Farm, the Food Hub, or to our market stall. We will have some extra bags available at the Hub and Farm locations, but not at Argus, Agricole, or Pure Pastures.  You will need to check off your name on the Pick Up List at the Washtenaw Food Hub from 9 AM-12 PM, Tantre Farm from 2-5 PM, Pure Pastures from 10 AM-5 PM,  Argus-Packard from 8 AM-5 PM, or Agricole from 9 AM-12 PM. Please ask for help if you need any help loading, and most importantly please make sure that your final payment goes into the Payment Envelope at the Hub or Farm distribution site on Saturday, if you haven’t paid for your share yet. All CSA members at Pure Pastures, Argus, and Agricole will need to mail their payment to the farm, since we are not able to pick up payments at these sites. Please have the courtesy to email or text/call Deb’s cell phone at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

Also, throughout the late fall and winter, please free to contact us, if you are interested in more Tantre vegetables, which you can always schedule to pick up at the Farm or the Ann Arbor Farmers Market on Saturdays from 7 AM-3 PM in December and on Saturdays in January from 8 AM- 3 PM.  If you have “liked” us on Tantre Farm’s Facebook page or Instagram, you will know when we are coming and what we are bringing, since we try to keep you updated when we can.  The People’s Food Coop and the 2 Argus Farm Stops of Ann Arbor and Agricole in Chelsea also continue to carry our vegetables throughout the winter and early spring, when hoop house spinach will be abundant!  
If you are interested in our Summer CSA shares for 2020, our online registration will be open sometime in January.   Stay tuned!  As of now we also have gift certificates available at the AA Farmers market for those who want to make a smaller gift amount to someone during this holiday time.

Thanks for buying locally and seasonally.  We wish you a sustainably rich and enlightened transition into light as we enter the end of 2019 and begin anew with 2020!                
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

DRIED HEIRLOOM BEANS (Soup Mix):  NOKA Homestead (www.nokahomestead) is a small CSA farm using organic methods in Gregory, MI.  You can find their food and more dried beans at the Dexter Farmers Market, both Arguses, and Agricole. Their soup mix is a blend of over a dozen heirloom beans (Christmas limas, peregion, Arikara yellow, and calypso, to name a few!), rich in flavor and texture.   Please contact former Tantre farmers, Noelle and Oscar, at nokahomestead@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: Soak beans overnight before using. Then cook them up with onion, garlic, potatoes, carrots, celery, and your favorite broth for a delicious warming soup. Cooking time is 1-2 hours. 
-How to store: Bagged beans store well in a cool dry spot; your pantry is perfect! 

BEETS (Red Ace):   round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor when eaten raw or cooked.
-How to use: roots good in juices, soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store:  store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

SOURDOUGH HERB BREAD: This delicious flavorful bread is provided by Raterman Bread located in Chelsea using non-GMO flour and infused with a variety of herbs and dried tomatoes provided by Tantre Farm. The sourdough is extremely high hydration and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, the Chelsea Farmers Market, and Webster Farmers Market  during the summers and fall.  You can reach Nick Raterman at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.

CABBAGE (Storage No. 4): solid blue-green heads are round with a tapered base, have delicious, crisp leaves, and are capable of long-term storage into spring.
-How to use:  steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store: It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.  When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

CARROTS (Orange, Red, and Purple):  You will receive Chantenay (orange root, but shorter than other cultivars with greater girth and broad shoulders that taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; easily diced for use in canned or prepared foods), Malbec (smooth, uniform long red-skinned roots with consistent, rich red internal color for multiple uses as whole roots, sliced, or mini carrots; excellent carrot flavor for stews and vegetable dishes), and Purple Haze (bright purplish roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade, but exquisite served raw or roasted coins).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:  Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks or longer.

GARLIC (Music): a hardneck variety, identified by a stiff, woody stem running through the center of the bulb. Each bulb is tightly wrapped in layers of porcelain white, thin, papery skin and contains an average of 4 to 7 extra large cloves per bulb. You will find this in a net bag with the onions.
-How to use:  Excellent in all cooking: salad dressings, garlic bread, meats, stir fries, soups, roasted veggies;  make garlic butter with 1/2 cup of softened butter mashed with four minced cloves of garlic.
-How to store: store for several months in a cool, dark, dry, well-ventilated place; if cloves begin to get soft or moldy, break off bad part, chop, and pack into small jar filled with olive oil, then refrigerate (great gift idea!) or freeze.  

KALE (Green Curly):  well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”. Kale is high in vitamins A, C, and K, folic acid, fiber, calcium and iron and has the highest protein content of all cultivated vegetables.
-How to use: for salads, soups, and light cooking
-How to store: keep in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 1 week

KOHLRABI (Kossak): Only the Food Hub and the Farm members will receive this, due to lack of space in the boxes!  If others at Argus, Pure Pastures, or Agricole want the kohlrabi you can stop at the farm anytime or the Ann Arbor Farmers Market on Saturdays to pick one up sometime in the next month.  Unfortunately we found that they were just too big to fit in boxes and these other sites do not have room for large, bulk items on the side.  This is a giant variety of kohlrabi for storage; up to 8-12 inches in diameter; delicious bulbous member of the cabbage family, that grows above ground; green skin and sweet, crisp, apple-white flesh; tubers and leaves are good sources of vitamins C and A, calcium, potassium, and fiber.
-How to use: good steamed and then mashed with potatoes, added to soups or stews, absolutely delicious raw in slaws (see newsletter recipe), or sliced in sticks with dip.
-How to store: keep in cold storage for up to 4 months

MICROGREENS (Pea Shoots or Sunflower Shoots): Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.Garden Works Organic Farm is providing you with pea shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C, betacarotene, folic acid, and calcium) OR sunflower shoots (nutritional powerhouse packed with vitamins A, B complex, D, and E; and minerals including calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus).  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm just around the corner from the Food Hub.   Garden Works operates year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, wheatgrass, and other microgreens available throughout the year selling their produce at the AA Farmers Market, People’s Food Coop and both Argus Farm Stops. Contact Rob MacKercher at gardenworksorganic@gmail.com.
-How to use:  enhance a salad, garnish soups or main dishes, delicious stir-fried with garlic and sesame oil for Asian cooking
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

ONIONS:  You will receive a mixed net bag of garlic and Copra (medium-sized, dark, yellow-skinned onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions; same sulfurous compounds that draw tears inhibit rot, so the more pungent the onion the longer it will store) and Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color and will store for six months or more under proper conditions).
-How to use: good in French onion soup, great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, grilled.
-How to store:  can last for 3 to 6 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.  Just cut out the bad part, chop up the rest of the onion and freeze.

POTATOES:  You will receive the following varieties of potatoes in a net bag including Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads),  and then an individual 3 lb. bag of Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:  keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container; ideal temperature is 38-48 degrees with high humidity (80-90%).  A basement or very cool closet will work.  If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout.

DAIKON RADISHES: These Daikons will be in a mixed net bag with watermelon radish; the 2 varieties of Daikons are Alpine (the smooth, attractive roots are large and white with green shoulders; looks like an overgrown green carrot, but with a slightly mild radish taste; crunchy and sweet texture; good macrobiotic root that is good for the gut) and K-N Bravo (looks like an overgrown carrot with beautiful, lavender-purple color; good, sweet, eating quality).
-How to use:  excellent julienned, sliced, used in a salad or tossed with your favorite vinaigrette; good eaten fresh, roasted, or pickled
-How to store: not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks

WATERMELON RADISH:  This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag with Daikons; this heirloom Chinese variety is a large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta/pink flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste and will be bagged with the daikon radishes and the parsnips.
-How to use:  soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with your favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

MAPLE PECAN SQUASH PIE: Harvest Kitchen (www.harvest-kitchen.com) has created this custom-made, seasonal pie featuring Tantre butternut, Georgian candy roaster, and heart of gold squashes, roasted until tender and blended with organic milk, eggs, and spices in a light,  flaky, and golden crust laced with local maple syrup and toasted pecans. Harvest Kitchen produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and the new Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale at info@harvest-kitchen.com.
-How to use: From the fridge eat at cold/room temperature or reheat in the oven covered with foil at 300 degrees for 10-15 minutes. From the freezer defrost in the fridge for 2 days and follow the fridge instructions.
-How to store: This pie can be stored in the fridge for up to 7 days or in the freezer for 90 days and are prebaked for your convenience. 

SAUERKRAUT:   We are pleased to offer you the Brinery’s Sauerkraut Storm Cloud Zapper (beets, cabbage, ginger). This sauerkraut is raw, unpasteurized, and traditionally fermented. This Brinery kraut is a cornerstone of health, both mentally and physically.  Steeped in the ancient art and necessity of fermentation, every jar carries the culture onward.  Filled with flavor and beneficial bacteria, your microbiome will thank you!  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by former Tantré farmer, David Klingenberger.  For more information, please visit www.thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially meat dishes, salads, roasted veggies, or sandwiches.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor, since it will get stronger with more age.
*NOTE: This sauerkraut jar has NOT been canned, so store in refrigerator.
Sauerkraut Background & Recipes:
www.timesunion.com/living/article/Sauerkraut-on-New-Year-s-a-Pennsylvania-tradition-561496.php
www.cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016892-sauerkraut-and-apples

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive the following:  
*Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh)
*Jester Acorn (about the size of Carnival squash, but with better eating quality; an oval, ivory-colored squash with green striping between the ribs that is tapered on both ends with small to average ribs)
*Carnival (multicolor Sweet Dumpling with colorful patches and flecks of dark and light green, orange, and yellow; sweet flesh and edible skin)
*Heart of Gold (a sweet dumpling hybrid acorn squash; outer skin is cream colored with dark green stripes covering a fine-grained inner flesh that is orange when ripe; sweet rich flavor and can be baked, mashed or steamed)
-How to use: bake, steam, roast until tender in chunks, thin wedges or in half; mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store:  Some varieties can keep for several months at 45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.
-How to freeze: If you notice a squash is getting soft or a spot starts to show rot, cut off the bad spot, and bake it, puree it, and freeze it in freezer bags for future use.

RECIPES

APPLE STUFFED SQUASH (There is a Season: Cooking with the Good Things Grown in Michigan)
2 Acorn or Jester squash
3 Tbs. butter
2 chopped apples
1 chopped onion
2 c. cottage cheese
2 Tbs. lemon juice
3/4 c. grated cheddar cheese
1/4 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 c. raisins (optional)

Cut squash in half lengthwise; remove seeds.  Place face down on oiled baking sheet; bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour.  While squash is baking, sauté apples and onions in butter.  Add remaining ingredients to apples.  Stuff squash with mixture, covered, 15-20 minutes.  Optional: Garnish with the Brinery’s Sauerkraut.

TANTRÉ FARM SLAW (A simple, easy salad!) Serves 4.
1 cup beets (2 medium ), grated
1 cup carrots (3-4 large), grated
1 cup kohlrabi, grated
1/2 cup watermelon radish and/or Daikon radish (1 or 2), grated
1 onion, chopped (optional)
sesame or sunflower seeds, toasted
olive oil or toasted sesame oil
lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Pea Shoots (optional garnish)

Grate vegetables into a bowl.  Chop scallions, if desired, and add to bowl.  Toast sesame or sunflower seeds.  Add when cooled.  Add olive oil and lemon juice as a salad dressing to suit your taste.  Be careful of too much liquid.  The tartness of the lemon should be prominent.   Serve immediately or marinate for a few hours in the refrigerator.  Garnish with Pea or Sunflower Shoots. Note: Add other items such as shredded Brussels Sprouts, apples, etc.

TANTRE FARM OVEN-ROASTED HARVEST VEGETABLES (Keep in mind, any combination of the following root vegetables will work.  Roasted veggies are standard at many Tantre Farm meals.)
1 c. rainbow carrots, quartered or chunks
1/2 lb. unpeeled multi-colored potatoes, cut into chunks if large
1 watermelon radish and/or Daikon radish, julienned
1 c. beets, chunked
1 onions, sliced
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 c. winter squash, cut into chunks
3-4 Tbs. vegetable or olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
2 tsp. chopped fresh sage or rosemary

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Combine any combination of vegetables above in large bowl, except parsley.  Drizzle oil over.  Sprinkle with garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper; toss gently to coat.  Bake for 30 minutes in 1 or 2 roasting pans or until vegetables are beginning to slightly brown. Turn the vegetables 2 or 3 times during cooking to prevent burning.  Then increase heat to 425° and add chopped parsley (or may be added as a fresh garnish at the very end), toss vegetables, and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring once, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned. Makes 6-8 servings.  Optional: Serve with Raterman Bread.

KALE AND KOHLRABI SALAD (http://canolaeatwell.com/recipe/kohlrabi-and-kale-slaw)
4 cups kale, chopped
1-2 cups kohlrabi bulb, peeled and julienned
1/2 cup shredded carrots
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup toasted pecans

Dressing
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
salt and pepper

Combine kale, kohlrabi, carrots, dried cranberries and pecans in a large bowl. In a small bowl whisk together red wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, honey, minced garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper.  Mix dressing with salad until well coated.  Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving.  Optional: Garnish with Pea or Sunflower Shoots.

BEET AND CARROT PANCAKES (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)  Serves 8
1 1/3 cups (packed) coarsely shredded beets (2 medium)
1 cup coarsely shredded, carrots (2 medium)
1/2 cup thinly sliced onion
2 cloves minced garlic
1 large egg
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/3 cup all purpose flour
3 Tbsp olive oil
Sour cream

Preheat oven to 300 degrees.  Place baking sheet in oven.  Combine beets, carrots and onion in large bowl.  Mix in egg, salt and pepper.  Add flour; stir to blend well.  Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat.  Using 1/3 cup beet mixture for each pancake, flatten into pancake with your hands, and then put 4 pancakes into skillet.  Flatten with spatula, if need be, into a 3-inch round.  Cook until brown and cooked through, about 4 minutes per side.  Transfer pancakes to baking sheet in oven; keep warm.  Repeat with remaining beet mixture, making 4 more pancakes.  Serve pancakes with sour cream.  Serve with Brinery Sauerkraut!

AUTUMN MINESTRONE SOUP (Moosewood Restaurant Daily Special by the Moosewood Collective)  Yields 12 cups.  Serves 6 to 8.
2 Tbs. vegetable oil
1 c. chopped onions
2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
2 1/2 c. peeled and cubed winter squash
2 celery stalks, diced
1/2 c. peeled and diced carrots
2 1/2 c. cubed potatoes
1 tsp. dried oregano
2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper
6 c. water
4 c. chopped kale
1 1/2 c. cooked “NOKA Homestead” beans

Warm the oil in a large soup pot on medium heat.  Add the onions and garlic, and sauté for 5 minutes.  Add the squash, celery, carrots, potatoes, oregano, salt, pepper, and water; cook for 10 minutes or until potatoes are almost done.  Add the kale and beans (drained) and simmer for another 5 to 7 minutes, until the kale is tender and the beans are hot.  Serve with Raterman Bread.

BEET, CABBAGE, AND APPLE SLAW (from Washington Post, October 19, 2011)  Makes 5 cups or 6-7 servings
1-2 medium (12 oz) beets, cut into chunks
2 medium (about 1 lb) apples, cored, cut into chunks
1/2 head (about 2 cups) cabbage, or 2 cups kohlrabi, shredded
3 Tbsp champagne vinegar
1 Tbsp agave syrup (or other sweetener)
1 Tbsp Dijon-style mustard
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
10 stems flat-leaf parsley, coarsely chopped, (1/2 cup packed)

Use a box grater or a food processor to coarsely shred the chunks of beet and apples and place in a large bowl.  Add the shredded cabbage to the bowl.  Whisk together the vinegar, agave syrup, mustard and salt in a liquid measuring cup or small bowl. Whisk in the oil and pour the dressing over the beet-cabbage mixture and toss to coat thoroughly.  Sprinkle the parsley over it all.  Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.  Serve chilled.  Optional: Garnish with Pea or Sunflower Shoots.

BRAISED DAIKON (from Winter Harvest Cookbook)   Serves 4.  
1 Daikon radish, peeled and diced
2 Tbs. light cooking oil
1 tsp. sugar (or honey)
1 1/2 Tbs. soy sauce

Put Daikon in saucepan, cover with water, and boil 5 minutes.  Drain well.  Heat skillet, add oil, and stir-fry Daikon for 2 minutes.  Add sugar and soy sauce; stir fry another minute.  Add 1/4 cup water, cover, and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until Daikon is tender, but not mushy, about 30 minutes.  Serve hot. Optional: Garnish with Pea or Sunflower Shoots.

RUSTIC CABBAGE SOUP RECIPE (from www.101cookbooks.com)  Serves 4
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
A big pinch of salt
1/2 lb potatoes, skin on, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
5 cups stock
1 1/2 cups cooked NOKA Homestead beans
1/2 medium cabbage, cored and sliced into 1/4-inch ribbons
More good-quality extra-virgin olive oil for drizzling
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

Warm the olive oil in a large thick-bottomed pot over medium-high heat.  Stir in the salt and potatoes.  Cover and cook until they are a bit tender and starting to brown a bit, about 5 minutes (it is ok to uncover and stir a couple times).  Stir in the garlic and onion and cook for another minute or two.  Add the stock and the beans and bring the pot to a simmer.  Stir in the cabbage and cook for a couple more minutes, until the cabbage softens up a bit.  Now adjust the seasoning–getting the seasoning right is important or your soup will taste flat and uninteresting.  Taste and add more salt if needed, the amount of salt you will need to add will depend on how salty your stock is (varying widely between brands, homemade, etc).  Serve drizzled with a bit of olive oil and a generous dusting of cheese. Optional: Serve with Raterman Bread.

BEET CHOCOLATE CAKE (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC)  This is remarkably delicious and simple!
2 cup sugar
2 cup flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/4 cup oil
3-4 oz unsweetened chocolate
4 eggs
3 cup shredded beets

Combine dry ingredients.  Sift or mix well together.  Melt chocolate very slowly over low heat or in a double boiler.  Allow chocolate to cool; then blend thoroughly with eggs and oil.  Combine flour mixture with chocolate mixture, alternating with the beets.  Pour into 2 greased 9-inch cake pans.  Bake at 325 degrees for 40-50 minutes, or until knife/toothpick can be removed from the center cleanly. 

2019 Thanksgiving Share

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
THANKSGIVING SHARE
November 23, 2019

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING, EVERYONE!
The Polar Express steamed down upon us with ice and snow and below normal temperatures these past few weeks.   Thanks to the help of a few of our hardy CSA members, we were able to dig up tons of root vegetables with our scanty farm crew. We managed to harvest the majority of the Thanksgiving Share of tubers and roots and stack them into the root cellar by working both Saturdays and Sundays these past two weekends.  We also slid thousands of crates into the squash room and the insulated panel truck to prevent freezing of kohlrabi, cabbage, and squash.   Now after several days, the cold has lifted and the sun, so sweet and gentle, has faithfully returned to warm and thaw the earth.  So many early winter/fall field items such as kale, Brussels sprouts, parsley, rosemary are still edible, but not perfect, maybe even a bit wilted, but please be understanding of what weather extremes they have just endured.  We have met the end of our fall season with an abrupt and dramatic, instant moment. Our farm has so much to share with all of the community of hungry beings–from the red-bellied woodpecker collecting the last sweet, sagging persimmons from our backyard trees to the cows being turned out in the fields to glean the last of the stubbly cabbage and broccoli stems and to lick and gnaw the frozen taste of summer watermelons like so many giant boulders left to their jellied translucence for the cows to gently snuffle the sweet remains of this muddy, icy end of 2019.

The vegetables for this bountiful distribution have been compiled into 1 big wooden (1 3/4-bushel) crate,  1 smaller wooden crate (1 1/9 bushel), and a 1 wax cardboard box (the usual one for the Summer CSA, so 1/2 bushel).  You may want to bring your own containers or bags, if you don’t want to haul these containers home.  You can also return them anytime to the Farm or the Ann Arbor or Chelsea Farmers’ Market throughout this winter.  Most of the following items can be stored for long-term (especially the root vegetables) or preserved very simply, so please note storage or simple cooking tips listed below, or on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” on our website under CSA INFO or RECIPES tabs.

Please feel free to give us a call or e-mail throughout the fall, winter, and spring, if you are interested in a refill of any of the following produce.  We are planning on being at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market on Wed., Nov. 27, for any last minute Thanksgiving purchases.  We will continue coming to the Ann Arbor Farmers Market on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout December and then also on Saturdays for Jan. – April, as much as the weather allows us.  We will also continue to be at the Chelsea Winter Farmers Market from Nov. 30 through December 14.  If you have “liked” us on Tantre Farm’s Facebook page or Instagram, you will know when we are coming, since we will try to keep you updated.  Also, throughout the fall and winter, we will continue delivering our produce into Ann Arbor to the People’s Food Coop, Argus Farm Stop on Liberty and Packard in Ann Arbor, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea.

We also offer some Winter Share opportunities.  Our online registration will open soon for our collaborative Winter Solstice CSA on December 21, which honors the shortest day of the year.  We also will keep you informed about our Midwinter Morning’s Dream CSA and Summer CSA of 2020.  More descriptions of these shares on our website, and we will send a separate email announcement for each one when sign ups are ready.

Thank you for buying locally and seasonally.  We wish you a safe, healthy, and enjoyable Thanksgiving!
–Deb, Richard & the 2019 Tantre Farm Crew

HARVEST KITCHEN–PREPARED FOODS:  
Need some help for holidays? Harvest Kitchen is cooking up a  fantastic Thanksgiving feast featuring local birds, local produce, and tempting pumpkin and pecan pies.  Supplement your holiday meal or let Harvest Kitchen take care of everything you need.  Also, be sure and check out Harvest Kitchen’s website at http://harvest-kitchen.com, if you’re interested in fresh, delicious, farm to table meals delivered right to your door or some other convenient location. Just check on the various meal plan options or gift cards.

THANKSGIVING TURKEYS: 
Thanksgiving turkeys are available to order from Two Tracks Acres, a 10 acre farm in Grass Lake, Michigan. These are free-range, broad-breasted white turkeys that range 11-22 pounds. Turkeys are $4.50/lb, and are fresh (not frozen) with on farm pickup the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. Contact Stephanie Willette at twotracksacres@gmail.com or visit the website www.twotracksacres.com.  

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE?

BEETS (Red Ace):  You will receive these roots in a mixed net bag with celeriac.  These round, smooth, deep red topless roots with sweet flavor when eaten raw or cooked.  
-How to use: roots good in juices, soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store:  store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS:  You will receive 2-3 stalks of tiny, green cabbage-like sprouts with mildly pungent, mustard-like flavor. These sprouts are very easy to break off and seem to store better while still on the stalk until ready for use.
-How to use:  Boil or steam for 5-10 minutes without overcooking, so they are still bright green; toss with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper, or a pat of butter; excellent roasted or stir-fried.
-How to store:  Refrigerate for up to a week or more unwashed in a plastic bag in hydrator drawer.  

GREEN CABBAGE (Storage No. 4): solid blue-green heads are round with a tapered base, have delicious, crisp leaves, and are capable of long-term storage into spring; cabbage has a good amount of vitamins A and C, calcium, potassium, and magnesium.
-How to use: good steamed, stir-fried, or chopped raw into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store: refrigerate for several months, and just peel off outer leaves as needed.

CARROTS (Red, Orange, and Purple):  You will receive these topless, frost-sweetened carrots in separate plastic bags.   Malbec (beautiful red roots throughout, best cooked to deepen the color and improve the texture; excellent carrot flavor for stews and vegetable dishes), Chantenay (shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods), and Purple Haze (bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor).  You will also receive a separate bunch of Sugarsnax (smooth, uniform, 9-inch tapered roots that are tender and sweet).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:  Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

CAULIFLOWER (Romanesco): lime green, spiraled heads with pointed, spiraled pinnacles; crisp and mild.
-How to use: Raw for salads and dips, steamed, sautéed, or roasted.
-How to store: Sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.

CELERIAC (Celery Root):   You will receive these roots in a mixed net bag with beets.  This root is a small rather ugly, knobby, brown vegetable skin with white flesh when peeled; taste is a wonderful cross between strong celery and parsley; high in carbohydrates, vitamin C, phosphorus, and potassium; any recipes in the A to Z Cookbook.
-How to use: can be eaten raw in slaws or salads or cooked in soups, stews, purees; can also be baked, boiled, or sauteed; after peeling should be soaked in lemon juice to prevent discoloration of the flesh.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to a month; may also be dried and used as a seasoning.

GARLIC (German White): You will receive the garlic in a net bag mixed with the onions.  Garlic is a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system.
-How to use:  Excellent in all cooking; make garlic butter with 1/2 cup of softened butter mashed with four minced cloves of garlic
-How to store: store for several months in a cool, dark, dry, well-ventilated place; if cloves begin to get soft or moldy, break off bad part, chop, and pack into small jar filled with olive oil, then refrigerate (great gift idea) or freeze.  

FRESH HERBS:  Please keep in mind that these herbs have been through subzero temperatures and have bounced back, but may not be in supreme “summer” shape though the delicious oils and aromas are still in tact.  You will receive both Parsley (dark green leaves—curly or flat-leaf are interchangeable–strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces) and Rosemary (pine needle-like leaves used with potatoes, bread doughs, risottos, mixed vegetables, and meat dishes, as well as in sweet dishes such as lemonade, creams, custards, and syrups).
-How to store: Place in plastic bag and store in refrigerator up to a week or put herb bunch in jar with 2 inches of water.  

KALE:  You will receive Rainbow Lacinato (unique “purple dino” kale that has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins) and Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”).  These bitter greens are remarkably sweeter after several frosts!  Kale has a sweet, mild, cabbage flavor and is a rich source of phytochemicals, which may ward off various forms of cancer; very high in calcium, iron, vitamins A, C, and K.
-How to use:  Boil or steam until color brightens (Colors will darken or fade if overcooked, and then can be mushy, tasteless, and less nutritious); great in omelets, quiches, lasagna, casseroles, soups, stews, gravies, and smoothies.
-How to store:  Refrigerate unwashed in plastic bag for to 2 weeks.  
-How to freeze:  Blanch washed greens for 1-2 minutes, rinse in cold water, drain, and pack into air-tight containers, or just destem, chop, and freeze in bags.  

ONIONS:  You will receive the onions in a net bag mixed with the garlic.  Copra (medium-sized, dark yellow-skinned storage onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions; same sulfurous compounds that draw tears inhibit rot, so the more pungent the onion the longer it will store) and Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color and will store for six months or more under proper conditions).
-How to use: good in French onion soup, great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, grilled.
-How to store:  can last for 3 to 6 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.  Just cut out the bad part, chop up the rest of the onion and freeze.

POTATOES:  Everyone will receive a few mixed net bags of the following varieties of potatoes including: Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried), Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:  keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag; ideal temperature is 38-45 degrees with high humidity (80-90%).  A basement or very cool closet will work.  If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout; light turns them green; don’t refrigerate, since the starches turn to sugars.

PIE PUMPKIN (Baby Bear): bright orange skin with dry, sweet flesh
-How to use: Excellent for pies (For other ideas see winter squash)
-How to store: store whole pumpkins at room temperature up to a month or for 2 to 3 months in moderately cool conditions (45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity).

DAIKON RADISHES: These purple daikon will be in a mixed net bag with watermelon radish and the white daikon will be by itself.  Alpine (the smooth, attractive roots are white with green shoulders; looks like an overgrown green carrot, but with a slightly mild radish taste; crunchy and sweet texture; good macrobiotic root that is good for the gut) and K-N Bravo (looks like an overgrown carrot with beautiful, lavender-purple color; good, sweet, eating quality).
-How to use:  excellent julienned, sliced, used in a salad or tossed with your favorite vinaigrette; good eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled
-How to store: not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks

WATERMELON RADISH:  This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag with the purple daikon.  Watermelon Radish is an heirloom Chinese variety; large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste; very mild.
-How to use:  soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

SAUERKRAUT:   We are pleased to offer TWO jars of the Brinery’s Sauerkraut: Galaxy Rose (featuring Tantre Watermelon Radish) and Shielding Rose (featuring Heirloom Garlic).  The Brinery is a local foods business, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer alum, David Klingenberger.  For more information, please visit www.thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially meat dishes, salads, roasted veggies, or sandwiches.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED up to 1 year or longer depending on how you like the flavor, since it will get stronger with more age. *NOTE: This sauerkraut jar has NOT been canned, so store in refrigerator.
***
Sauerkraut Background & Recipes:  http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-11-27/entertainment/bs-md-sauerkraut-and-turkey-20131125_1_sauerkraut-reuben-sandwich-cabbage!
www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Turkey-with-Sauerkraut-Riesling-and-Pork-Sausages
www.timesunion.com/living/article/Sauerkraut-on-New-Year-s-a-Pennsylvania-tradition-561496.php
www.cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016892-sauerkraut-and-apples

WINTER SQUASH:  You will receive all of the following varieties:  
*Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh)
*Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash)
*Carnival (multicolor Sweet Dumpling with colorful patches and flecks of dark and light green, orange, and yellow; sweet flesh and edible skin)
*Jester Acorn (about the size of Carnival squash, but with better eating quality; an oval, ivory-colored squash with green striping between the ribs that is tapered on both ends with small to average ribs)
*Black Forest Kabocha (smaller size kabocha; dark green, flat-round fruits; buttercup size with no button on end; orange flesh is medium-dry and sweet)
*Spaghetti (3-5-pounds, golden yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet)
-How to store:  Keep for several months (depending on the variety) at 45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.  **Here is a great link, which offers good advice for storing winter squash: https://bonnieplants.com/library/how-to-store-winter-squash/

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar”, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  

TANTRÉ FARM SLAW (A simple, easy salad!) Serves 4.
2 medium beets, grated
3 large carrots (any color), grated
1 watermelon radish, grated
sesame or sunflower seeds, toasted
olive oil
lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Grate vegetables into a bowl.  Chop onion, if desired, and add to bowl.  Toast sesame or sunflower seeds.  Add when cooled.  Add olive oil and lemon juice as a salad dressing to suit your taste.  Be careful of too much liquid.  The tartness of the lemon should be prominent.   Serve immediately or marinate for a few hours in the refrigerator. Variations:  Add shredded cauliflower, daikon radish, Brussels sprouts, chopped parsley, etc.

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND CAULIFLOWER WITH ORANGE (from Bon Appetit, December 2004)
1 cauliflower (about 2 lbs), cut into 1-inch florets
1 lb fresh Brussels sprouts, thawed and patted dry, halved if large
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup minced onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 Tbsp grated orange peel
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
Orange slices
Additional chopped fresh parsley for garnish
Preheat oven to 450 degrees.  Combine first 6 ingredients in large bowl; toss to coat.  (Can be made 2 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature.)  Spread vegetables on large rimmed baking sheet.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Roast in oven until lightly browned and almost tender, stirring once, about 12 minutes.  Pour orange juice over.  Roast until vegetables are tender and juices evaporate, about 8 minutes.  Stir in 1/3 cup chopped parsley.  Transfer to serving dish; garnish with orange slices and chopped parsley.

CELERIAC AND APPLE SALAD (from Victory Garden by Marian Morash)  Makes 5 cups
1 large celeriac (about 1 lb)
1/2 cup orange juice
3 firm tart apples
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
Peel and julienne celeriac into matchstick pieces.  Toss with orange juice until coated.  Peel, core, and chop apples; mix with celeriac.  Marinate for 10 minutes, turning often; strain, reserving juices.  Place mayonnaise in a large bowl, and little by little, add orange juice marinade until thinned to the point where it coats a spoon thickly.  Beat smooth and combine with the drained celeriac, apples, celery, and nuts.  Marinate for 2 hours, season with salt and pepper, and serve.

SCALLOPED SQUASH AND POTATOES (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure)
3 cups dry winter squash (kabocha, butternut, or red kuri), peeled and cut into chunks
2 cups diced potatoes
1/3 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped cooked ham
1/4 cup flour
1 Tbsp chopped parsley
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1 1/3 cups whole milk
2 Tbsp butter
Place half of squash and potatoes in a greased 1 1/2-quart casserole dish.  Sprinkle half the amount of ham and onions.  Whisk together flour, parsley, salt, pepper, and nutmeg with milk.  Pour half the mixture over vegetables.  Dot with half the butter.  Repeat layers.  Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  Uncover and bake 10-15 minutes, or until vegetables tender.

STIR-FRIED DAIKON (from Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables by John Peterson) Serves 4.
2 tablespoons peanut oil
1/4 cup sliced scallions or 1 small onion
3 medium daikon or watermelon radishes, thinly sliced (3 cups)
10–12 red radishes, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon hot chili oil or more to taste (optional)
2 Tbsp finely chopped parsley
Heat the peanut oil in a wok over high heat. Add the scallions; stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the daikon and red radishes; stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the water and continue stir-frying until all the water has all evaporated.  Add the soy sauce, sugar, and chili oil, mixing everything together vigorously and cooking for 30 seconds more. Immediately transfer to a serving platter.  Serve hot.  May garnish with finely chopped parsley.  This makes a great meal with teriyaki salmon and a bowl of rice!

SPICY COCONUT PUMPKIN (from Farmer John’s Cookbook by John Peterson and Angelic Organics)  Serves 3-4
3 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced (about 2 cups)
1 Tbsp minced fresh ginger
2-3 tsp curry powder
1 tsp finely chopped jalapeno or Serrano pepper
1/2 tsp ground cloves
1/4 tsp ground cardamom
1 1/2 lbs pie pumpkin (about 1/2 medium or 1 small pie pumpkin), peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 1/2 cups coconut milk
1 Tbsp raisins
1 tsp maple syrup or brown sugar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 bunch kale
Heat the butter and oil in a heavy pan over medium heat.  Add the onion; saute until lightly browned, about 20 minutes.  Add the ginger; cook for 3 more minutes.  Stir in the curry powder, jalapeno, cloves, and cardamom; cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly.  Add the pumpkin chunks, coconut milk, raisins, and maple syrup.  Cover; cook over low heat until the pumpkin is tender, about 30 minutes.  Uncover; if the sauce is thin, let the coconut milk boil away until the mixture thickens to your liking.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.  For a hearty meal, enjoy this over a bed of basmati rice accompanied by kale and chutney.

CARROT PUDDING (from AllRecipes.com by Judith Nees)
1 1/2 lbs carrots, chopped
2 eggs
3/4 cup white sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
3/4 Tbsp baking powder
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Steam or boil carrots until tender; mash.  In an electric mixer with whisk attachment or by hand, beat eggs into carrots, one at a time.  Beat in sugar, vanilla and baking powder.  Fold in flour.  Pour into a 2-quart baking dish.  Bake in preheated oven 30 minutes, until puffed and set.

COOKED GREENS WITH PARSLEY AND GARLIC (from Mad Mares Cookbook)
6 cups greens (arugula, bok choy, kale, spinach, chard, collards, etc.)
2 large cloves garlic
Sea salt
1 bunch parsley leaves
1 or 2 Tbsp olive oil
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp cumin
1 lemon, cut into wedges
Make a mixture of greens.  Wash greens well and cut away stems.  Put greens in a pot, cover, and steam (putting tougher greens on the bottom) until tender, about 8-10 minutes.  Chop roughly.  Put garlic, a little salt and fresh parsley in a food processor.  Mix until everything is finely chopped (or by hand chop garlic, then add parsley and salt, and chop into rough paste).  Gradually warm oil with paprika and cumin in a large skillet.  Add the parsley paste and mix with oil.  Add greens and cook everything together for about 1 minute, until excess moisture has evaporated from skillet.  Garnish with lemon wedges.  

ITALIAN POTATOES WITH ONION AND ROSEMARY (from www.gardenguides.com)  Makes 4 servings
2 1/4 lbs potatoes, scrubbed, and thinly sliced (about 4 cups)
1 large onion, peeled and thinly sliced (about 1 3/4 cup)
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1/3 cup dry white wine
2 Tbsp chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 tsp chopped fresh rosemary
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Cook the potatoes in a microwave oven at full power for 7-8 minutes, until fork-tender.  (You can also boil the potatoes for 30-35 minutes in 4 cups of water to which 2 teaspoons of salt have been added.)  Set the potatoes aside until cool enough to handle.  Preheat a large nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. In the hot skillet, combine the onion, garlic, and wine. Stir to combine thoroughly and cook for about 15 minutes, until the onion is very soft.  Add the potatoes, parsley, and rosemary.  Mix well and mash with the back of a wooden spoon to form a large pancake.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.  Raise the heat to medium and cook for about 15 minutes, until the potatoes are browned and somewhat crusty underneath.  Position a plate upside down over the pan, flip the pancake out onto the plate so that the cooked side is up, and then slide it back into the pan.  Cook for about 15 minutes more, until the second side is crusty.  Serve hot.

ROSEMARY-ROASTED MASHED POTATOES (from The Maine Potato Catalog 2003 by Wood Prairie Farm)  Serves 6
8 cups (2 lbs) dry potatoes cut into 1-inch cubes
1 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp dried rosemary, crushed or 1 Tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp pepper
Cooking spray or light amount of oil
3/4 cup hot water
1/4 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup grated fresh Parmesan cheese
1/4 tsp garlic powder or 1 clove garlic, minced
8 oz container sour cream
Preheat oven to 425 degrees.  Combine first 5 ingredients in a shallow roasting pan coated with cooking spray; toss well to coat.  Bake for 30 minutes or until tender.  Combine water and remaining ingredients in a large bowl; add potato mixture.  Mash with a potato masher to desired consistency.  Serve immediately.

ROSEMARY-SPIKED CABBAGE (from https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/2435/rosemaryspiked-cabbage)
1 cabbage
4 Tbsp goose fat (or olive oil)
4 shallots (substitute onions)
1 rosemary sprig
2 whole garlic cloves
Quarter the cabbage, remove the core and shred the leaves. Blanch in a pan of boiling salted water for 3 mins, then hold under a cold tap to cool. Drain well. Heat the goose fat in a pan and sauté the shallots, rosemary sprig and garlic cloves for 5 mins, until golden. Discard the garlic and rosemary, toss in the cabbage, stir-frying until reheated. Season and serve.

WATERMELON RADISH SALAD (from http://www.inerikaskitchen.com/2011/01/watermelon-radish-salad-recipe.html)
2 large watermelon radishes
Juice of 1/2 lemon
2 Tbsp olive oil
Sea salt, to taste
Peel the very outer layer off the radishes–not too much, because you still want the outer layer to look green.  Grate or shred the watermelon radishes using a Kyocera julienne slicer, or the largest holes of a box grater, or your food processor.  In a large bowl, toss the watermelon radish shreds with the lemon juice and olive oil, and add a pinch of salt. Taste and add more salt if you like.  Serve chilled.

Ext. Week 4: October 20 – 26, 2019

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
Extended Fall CSA Share
WEEK #4
Oct. 20-26, 2019

    If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

    In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA:  an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS:  round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and beautiful, medium-tall, red-veined green leaves.
-How to use: greens can be substituted for spinach and chard in recipes; roots good in soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store: separate roots from leaves and store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; store greens wrapped in damp cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

FROST-SWEETENED BROCCOLI: a small head of deep emerald green (but turns purple with a frost!), tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems. **Keep in mind that one cup of cooked broccoli has more vitamin C than an orange and as much calcium as ¼ cup of milk; broccoli is also a good source of vitamin A, potassium, folate, iron, and fiber.
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well.
-How to use:  can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

LETTUCE:  All members will receive 3 small heads of Green Leaf, Red Leaf, and Romaine lettuce.
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups
-How to store:  refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

MUSHROOMS (Oyster): white, golden, or gray oyster-shaped cap with a mild, anise, earthy odor.
-How to use: brush off dirt to clean or wipe with damp cloth, do not wash or submerge in water; good grilled, sauteed, steamed, in soups, and in sandwiches.
-How to store: place in paper bag or wax bag and keep in refrigerator for up to 5-7 days.

ONIONS:  You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color) and Copra (medium-sized, dark yellow-skinned storage onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions).   
-How to store:  will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

CHILI PEPPERS:  You will receive Poblano (a mild variety of chili pepper known as “poblanos” when dark green; popular in Southwestern recipes; heart-shaped fruit, which is mildly pungent with a lightly sweet, medium-hot flavor) and/or Shishito (sweet, mild, slender green Japanese chiles about 2- to 4-inches with squarish end.  It is said that 1 in 6 are hot!)
-How to use: often roasted or used in stir-fried dishes, with tempura, in salads, or as a pickled condiment
-How to store: for fresh peppers, store in refrigerator; for drying peppers, place string through the stems and hang in cool, dry, well-ventilated spot.

SWEET PEPPERS:  You will receive a variety of Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe), Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh), Cornitos (exceptionally sweet, smaller versions of Carmen , but can be bright yellow or red when ripe; “bull’s horn” pepper type), or Green Bell Peppers (large blocky cells with fruity, slightly sweet flavor with green skin).
-How to use:  eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES (Mountain Rose): rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried.
-How to store:  Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag

RADICCHIO:  This beautiful, gourmet, salad vegetable is often called “Italian chicory”;  colorful, white-veined, red leaves with appealingly bitter, nut-like texture; bitter and spicy taste which mellows if it is grilled or roasted.
-How to use: raw in salads, roasted, grilled, sauteed; excellent side dish for rich dishes; pairs nicely with beef roast or stews.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

RADISHES (Bacchus):  stunning, purple, round radish with white inner flesh. Very good flavor and not too hot.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins!
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SPICY SALAD MIX (Spectrum): an amazing, mildly spicy, leafy salad mix of greens and reds with a wide variety of leaf shapes and sizes with ingredients such as Yukina Savoy, Golden Frills, Ruby Streaks, Tokyo Bekana, and Red Komatsuna).  
-How to use: used for salads and sauteing–cooks up quickly.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 2-4 days.

TATSOI: an Asian green with small, spoon-shaped, thick, dark-green leaves with tangy, sweet flavor.
-How to use: commonly eaten raw in salads, but can be cooked in stir-fries/soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag or wrap in a damp towel for up to a week.

WINTER SQUASH/PIE PUMPKIN: You will receive the following: Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh; great stuffed with rice, breading, or soups),  Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash), and Red Kuri (Orange Hokkaido) (type of Hubbard squash that is reddish-orange in color with a brown, “corky“ stem; round to oval; about 4-7 pounds; medium-dry, medium sweet orange flesh; good for pies and purees).
-How to use: boil, steam, saute, bake or roast, grill;  good in soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pie, etc.
-How to store:  Keep for several months in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees); will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. LAST WEEK OF EXTENDED FALL CSA:   This means Oct. 23 (Wed.), Oct. 24 (Fri.), and Oct. 25 (Sat.) are your last distribution days for our Extended Fall Shares. Please return any forgotten boxes from past weeks and bring bags or other containers to transfer your produce at your distribution sites.

2. THANKSGIVING CSA Registration is OPEN with New Pick Up Locations at AGRICOLE and PURE PASTURES!   A more detailed email notice about this will come out to you soon.  You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”, and sign up on our website.  This share is a one-time pick-up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $125. This share will be available for pick up on Nov. 23 (the Saturday before Thanksgiving) at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 AM-12 PM, at Tantré Farm (Chelsea) from 2-5 PM, at Agricole (Chelsea) from 9 AM-5 PM, and Pure Pastures (Plymouth) from 10 AM-5 PM.

3. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Argus (Sat)– 10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Agricole (Sat)—8 A.M. to 5 P.M.

RECIPES

SOUTHWEST COLACHE  (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
2 Tbsp oil (veggie or olive)
1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, diced
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
16 oz chopped tomatoes, fresh or canned, undrained
1 sweet pepper, seeded, chopped   
14 oz whole kernel corn
1 green chili, chopped (optional)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Grated cheese, for topping (optional)
    Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat.  Add squash, onion, and garlic; cook for 5 minutes or until onion is tender.  Add tomatoes and bell pepper to skillet.  Bring to simmer, cover and let simmer for 15 minutes over low heat.  Add remaining ingredients.  Simmer covered, 5 minutes, or until squash is tender.  Uncover; increase heat to high and continue cooking a few minutes or until most liquid has evaporated.  Top with grated cheese, if desired.  

BEET BURGERS (from America’s Small Farms by Joanne Lamb Hayes and Lori Stein)
2 cups grated beets (about 3/4 lb)
2 cups grated carrots (about 1/2 lb)
1 cup cooked brown rice
1 cup grated Cheddar cheese
1 cup sunflower seeds, toasted
2 large free-range eggs, beaten
1/2 cup sesame seeds, toasted
1/2 cup grated onion (about 1 medium)
1/4 cup oil
3 Tbsp all-purpose flour
3 Tbsp chopped parsley
2-4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 Tbsp soy sauce
Ground red pepper (cayenne), to taste
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Generously grease a rimmed baking sheet.  Combine beets, carrots, rice, cheese, sunflower seeds, eggs, sesame seeds, onion, oil, flour, parsley, garlic, soy sauce, and red pepper.  Form mixture into patties and bake 25-30 minutes or until firm and vegetables are cooked through.

ROASTED BEET AND RADICCHIO SALAD (from https://www.aspicyperspective.com/roasted-beet-radicchio-salad/)
4 large beets
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 head radicchio (can add tatsoi, arugula, or spicy salad greens)
1 red onion
1 bunch radishes
1/3 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped
3/4  cup crumbled queso fresco, or cotija
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon honey
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
    Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Trim the beets and place them in a baking dish. Drizzle the beets with 1 tablespoon of oil. Cover and roast for 30-35 minutes, until fork tender.Cut the head of radicchio into quarters. Remove the core and slice into thin strips. Place the radicchio in a bowl of ice water for 20-30 minutes to reduce the bitterness.  Slice the onion and radishes very thin. In a small bowl, whisk together 3 tablespoons of oil, vinegar, honey, garlic, salt and pepper.  When the beets have cooled a bit, peel off the skin and slice them into thin wedges.  Toss the radicchio, beets, onions, radishes, and mint with the vinaigrette. Top with crumbled queso fresco and serve.  Serves 4.

** Thank you for a wonderful EXTENDED FALL Season filled with gratitude, community building, and a bountiful harvest.  Please feel free to contact us throughout the rest of fall and winter for any storage produce or come visit us at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Chelsea Farmers Market, Argus Farm Stop, Agricole Farm Stop, and People’s Food Coop throughout the winter.  Thank you for being a member of the Tantre Farm Extended Fall CSA!!
–Deb, Richard, and the Tantre Farm Crew. **

Ext. Week 3: October 13 – 19, 2019

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
Extended Fall CSA Share
WEEK #3
Oct. 13-19, 2019

    If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

    In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA:  an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS:  round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and beautiful, medium-tall, red-veined green leaves.
-How to use: greens can be substituted for spinach and chard in recipes; roots good in soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store: separate roots from leaves and store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; store greens wrapped in damp cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well.
-How to use:  can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

CAULIFLOWER, ROMANESCO: lime green, spiraled heads with pointed, spiraled pinnacles; crisp and mild.
-How to use: raw for salads and dips, steamed, sauteed, or roasted.
-How to store: sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.

CELERY: tall, crisp, glossy green stalks and leaves with a strong, celery flavor; contains vitamins A, C, B-complex, and E with some other minerals; also high in fiber and sodium. *Organic celery tends to be a darker green, since it’s unblanched like commercial celery. The darker green color indicates more minerals and vitamins, but also is a bit stronger, so you may want to use a little less than you normally would.
-How to use: typically eaten raw and used in salads; ribs and leaves can be added to casseroles, soups, stews, and stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; can be frozen in slices on a cookie sheet and then packed into freezer bags; celery leaves can be dehydrated and added to soups or stews.  

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, & boosts the immune system.
-How to use:  minced raw in salad dressings, sautéed and added to stir-fries, meats, vegetables
-How to store: fresh garlic can be stored in an open, breathable container in a cool, dark place for many months.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm):  The frost has come, so some of the flowers didn’t hold up as well like zinnias and celosias, but there are some frost-hardy varieties, so you are welcome to see what you can find.   Please contact us if it will be on other days besides Wednesdays and Fridays, so we can make sure to be around to show you where to go.  A bouquet per household of up to 20 stems will be part of your share for your last bouquet of the season.  You may want to bring a vase/jar to keep your flowers fresh going home, but we will have donated yogurt containers to fill with water as well.  Your bouquet is part of your share, although you may always feel free to make a donation to pay for seeds, if you like.  Extra bouquets are $5.

ONIONS:  You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color) and Copra (medium-sized, dark yellow-skinned storage onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions).   
-How to store:  will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

SWEET PEPPERS:  You will receive Cornitos (exceptionally sweet, smaller versions of Carmen , but can be bright yellow or red when ripe; “bull’s horn” pepper type), Green Bell Peppers (large blocky cells with fruity, slightly sweet flavor with green skin), or Poblanos (a mild chili pepper; dark gray-green, heart-shaped fruit, which is mildly pungent with a lightly sweet, medium hot flavor).
-How to use:  eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES (Kerr’s Pink):  very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads
-How to store:  Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag

RADICCHIO:  This beautiful, gourmet, salad vegetable is often called “Italian chicory”;  colorful, white-veined, red leaves with appealingly bitter, nut-like texture; bitter and spicy taste which mellows if it is grilled or roasted.
-How to use: raw in salads, roasted, grilled, sauteed; excellent side dish for rich dishes; pairs nicely with beef roast or stews.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

RADISHES (Bacchus):  stunning, purple, round radish with white inner flesh. Very good flavor and not too hot.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins!
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SPICY SALAD MIX (Spectrum): an amazing, mildly spicy, leafy salad mix of greens and reds with a wide variety of leaf shapes and sizes with ingredients such as Yukina Savoy, Golden Frills, Ruby Streaks, Tokyo Bekana, and Red Komatsuna.  
-How to use: used for salads and sauteing–cooks up quickly.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 2-4 days.

TATSOI: an Asian green with small, spoon-shaped, thick, dark-green leaves with tangy, sweet flavor.
-How to use: commonly eaten raw in salads, but can be cooked in stir-fries/soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag or wrap in a damp towel for up to a week.

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive each of the following: Carnival (multicolor Sweet Dumpling with colorful patches and flecks of dark and light green, orange, and yellow; sweet flesh and edible skin) and Delicata (small, oblong, creamy colored with long green stripes, only slightly ribbed; pale yellow, sweet flesh; edible skin), and Spaghetti (3-5 pounds, golden-yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet)
-How to use: boil, steam, saute, roast, grill;  good in soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal
-How to store:  Keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees); will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. NEXT WEEK IS LAST WEEK OF EXTENDED FALL CSA:  This means Oct. 23 (Wed.), Oct. 24 (Fri.), and Oct. 25 (Sat.) are your last distribution days for our Extended Fall Shares, but please feel free to continue with our Thanksgiving CSA.  See details below. Please return any forgotten boxes from past weeks. You may bring bags, a cooler or other containers to transfer your produce from the boxes at your distribution site, especially next week, which is your final week of Ex. Fall Shares.  

2. THANKSGIVING CSA Registration is OPEN with New Pick Up Locations at AGRICOLE and PURE PASTURES!   A more detailed email notice about this will come out to you soon.  You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”, and sign up on our website.  This share is a one-time pick-up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $125. This share will be available for pick up on Nov. 23 (the Saturday before Thanksgiving) at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 AM-12 PM, at Tantré Farm (Chelsea) from 2-5 PM, at Agricole (Chelsea) from 9 AM-5 PM, and Pure Pastures (Plymouth) from 10 AM-5 PM.

3. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Argus (Sat)– 10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Agricole (Sat)—8 A.M. to 5 P.M.

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
by Deb and Richard

    As the west wind blows in gusts all day, the yellow leaves are driven to the hedge rows. The native plums drop to the cool, damp earth, and the golden orange persimmons drop as well under their waving tree limbs.  An awakening of the tongue to the tart, sweet delight of indigenous sustenance!  The seeds to be scattered over the lawn and garden in hopes of more fruiting trees.  At this time of year we are also seeing a few hazel nuts after 3 years of waiting for the trees to get big enough.   The paw paw tree is dropping large, ovarian-shaped fruits to the delight of the young and the old, the insects, the raccoons, the opossums, and the ants.  The last of the summer peppers are bending their little stems down to the ground filled with sweet, tender, bold red flesh.  All of the squash has been carefully packed away into wooden crates and brought to the timber frame squash room atop the root cellar.  This is a true site to behold with crates stacked to the ceiling with shades of orange, red, yellow, green, and apricot peaking between the slats.  The radishes are growing better than they have grown all season with this cool, wet weather.  Fortunately not too many flies are able to lay their eggs into the crunchy radish delight.  Finally the flea beetles have slowed down their defoliation allowing the bok choy, arugula, and tatsoi to flourish unhindered, to grow fat and sweet without being eviscerated.

    And so it goes, the end of a wonderful Summer season and the beginning of a new one in this Extended Fall share.  And within this context we look forward to a slower season of great celebration and feasting for all that has been planted.  We especially are looking forward to testing out our newly renovated Earth Oven that was sculpted with a new covering on Sunday with the help and expertise of Brendan from Earth L’oven.  Thanks to the many hands that mixed the sand, clay, and straw, especially Eileen, who had the original idea to renovate. Many homemade farm pizzas will continue to feed our hungry farm crew, friendly CSA members, and many farm to table guests with produce from the Fall season. And as the seasons pass from one to another and the wild spirits find their ways to distant lands, we are grateful for all those who come to join us at our hearth to be fed and warmed by the fire of this supportive community.

RECIPES

WHOLE ROASTED ROMANESCO WITH LEMON-THYME VINAIGRETTE (http://community.epicurious.com/post/whole-roasted-romanesco)
1 Romanesco cauliflower
1 lemon
2 Tbsp. olive oil
pinch of salt
1 tsp. thyme
    Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Cut the back off the Romanesco, rinse and air dry, laying it flat on a sheet pan. Drizzle with several tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Roast for 25-30 minutes until very tender, and browned at tips.  Whisk the juice of one lemon, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, a pinch of salt and 1 teaspoon of fresh thyme leaves. Drizzle over the top of the roasted romanesco, and roast for another 5 minutes.Pull away individual florets to serve.

CELERY SALAD WITH ROASTED PEPPERS AND MOZZARELLA (from Farmer John’s Cookbook by John Peterson)  Serves 4-6
1 bunch celery
2 roasted red peppers, cut into strips
4 oz mozzarella cheese, cut into strips
2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil
6 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 small clove garlic, minced (about 1/2 tsp)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
3 eggs, hard-cooked, sliced
    Combine the celery, roasted red peppers, mozzarella, and basil in a large bowl.  Whisk together the oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.  Pour the dressing over the salad; toss to coat.  Cover the bowl and chill for at least 2 hours.  Toss again before serving.  Arrange the egg slices decoratively around the salad.

Ext. Week 2: October 6 – 12, 2019

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
Extended Fall CSA Share
WEEK #2
Oct. 6-12, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.  

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA:  an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

GREEN BEANS (Jade):  long, slender, deep green, filet bean with firm texture and good taste).  
-How to use: raw in salads, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, etc.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS:  round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and beautiful, medium-tall, red-veined green leaves.
-How to use: greens can be substituted for spinach and chard in recipes; roots good in soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store: separate roots from leaves and store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; store greens wrapped in damp cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

NAPA CABBAGE: crinkly, thickly veined leaves, which are cream-colored with celadon green tips; unlike the strong-flavored waxy leaves on round cabbage heads, these are thin, crisp, and delicately mild; good source of vitamin A, folic acid, and potassium.
-How to use: use raw, saute, bake, or braised; common in stir-fries and main ingredient in traditional kimchi; also eaten raw as a wrap for pork or oysters; the outer, tougher leaves are used in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate, tightly wrapped, up to 5 days.  

CARROTS (Romance): blunt-tipped, deep orange roots with impressive flavor for a summer-harvested carrot; excellent greens this week!  Good in Carrot Top Soup!!
-How to use:  can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

SWEET CORN (Potawatomi):   excellent sweet flavor with yellow kernel; contains a significant amount of vitamin A, B-complex, phosphorous and potassium along with vegetable protein. * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some earworms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.
-How to use: ears of corn can be steamed in 1-2 inches of water for 6-10 minutes, or drop ears into boiling water (enough to cover) for 4-7 minutes; ears of corn can also be roasted unhusked in the oven or outside grill for about 20 minutes.
-How to store: refrigerate with husks on, and use as soon as possible to retain sweetness and flavor.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm):  Every summer we plant a variety of flowers for drying or fresh bouquets.  We welcome  you to the farm to pick your flowers on any day of the week until the first frost, but please contact us if it will be on other days besides Wednesdays and Fridays, so we can make sure to be around to show you where to go.  A bouquet per household of up to 15 stems will be part of your share, if you are able to come and pick it.  You may want to bring a vase/jar to keep your flowers fresh going home, but we will have donated yogurt containers to fill with water as well.  Your bouquet is part of your share, although you may always feel free to make a donation to pay for seeds, if you like.  Extra bouquets are $5.

ONIONS:  You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color) and Copra (medium-sized, dark yellow-skinned storage onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions).  
-How to store:  will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

SWEET PEPPERS:  You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Cornitos (exceptionally sweet, smaller versions of Carmen , but can be bright yellow or red when ripe; “bull’s horn” pepper type).
-How to use:  eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES (Mountain Rose): rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried.
-How to store:  Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag

RADICCHIO:  This beautiful, gourmet, salad vegetable is often called “Italian chicory”;  colorful, white-veined, red leaves with appealingly bitter, nut-like texture; bitter and spicy taste which mellows if it is grilled or roasted.
-How to use: raw in salads, roasted, grilled, sauteed; excellent side dish for rich dishes; pairs nicely with beef roast or stews.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

RADISHES (Bacchus):  stunning, purple, round radish with white inner flesh. Very good flavor and not too hot.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s!
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

TATSOI: an Asian green with small, spoon-shaped, thick, dark-green leaves with tangy, sweet flavor.
-How to use: commonly eaten raw in salads, but can be cooked in stir-fries/soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag or wrap in a damp towel for up to a week.

WATERMELON:  You will receive Starlight (10-12 pound round fruit; deep green with highly contrasting black stripes and pink flesh; excellent flavor with crisp texture) or Mini Love (sweet and firm, oval-round fruits avg. 3–5 lb. Distinctive, bright green rind with dark green stripes and dense, bright red flesh)
-How to use: slice, dice and serve as drinks, salads, or salsa.
-How to store: if melon seems not quite ripe, store at room temperature until sweet smell is coming from the soft, stem end; then store in the refrigerator.

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive each of the following: Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash) and Red Kuri (Orange Hokkaido) (type of Hubbard squash that is reddish-orange in color with a brown, “corky“ stem; round to oval; about 4-7 pounds; medium-dry, medium sweet orange flesh; good for pies and purees).
-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; boil or steam chunks for 15-20 minutes, or until tender (peel skins off “before” or “after“ cooked, but “after” is easiest when it’s cooled); mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store:  Keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. EARTH OVEN REPAIR WORKSHOP at Tantre Farm on Oct. 13 at 10 AM:  For those of you who have ever been to the farm on a Friday night, you have smelled the wood fire or the aroma of homemade pizza made for the farm crew every week. Right now it needs some tender, loving care as it has some cracks that have developed over time, so on Sunday, Brendan from Earth L’oven will be demonstrating how to add a new insulation layer to this earth oven.  In this day-long workshop, you will learn about ratios of sand, clay, and other materials that are optimal for making earth baking domes, folding, and mixing the materials. Bring some rain/mud boots for stomping, and please dress for the weather! Children are welcome, but must be supervised (of course, there is plenty to see and play with on site). Pack yourself a lunch or dinner and come hang out!  This workshop costs $5/adult.  Please feel free to come for all or part of the day. You can text or call at 734-385-6748, if you need to come late and want to see if we are still constructing it. Please call Brendan at 734-709-1792, if interested in an earth oven on your own property.

2. SAUERKRAUT PRESERVING WORKSHOP at the Washtenaw Food Hub on October 14 from 6 to 8 PM:  Come make your own sauerkraut at the WASHTENAW FOOD HUB using Tantre Farm produce! Brinery Fermentation Expert, Melissa, will be leading this Farm-to-Fermentation workshop that will cover the basics of wild vegetable fermentation. Participants will take home a jar of fermenting sauerkraut made during the workshop. Please register with “SAUERKRAUT” in the subject line by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $10 fee for materials and other ingredients. 

3. THANKSGIVING CSA Registration is OPEN!   A more detailed email notice about this will come out to you soon.  You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”, and sign up on our website.  This share is a one-time pick-up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $125. This share will be available for pick up on Nov. 23 (the Saturday before Thanksgiving) at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon and Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M.

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Argus (Sat)– 10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Agricole (Sat)—8 A.M. to 5 P.M.

RECIPES

SUPER EASY STIR-FRIED NAPA CABBAGE
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 pound shredded Napa cabbage
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon Chinese cooking wine
Heat the vegetable oil in a wok or large skillet over medium heat. Stir in the garlic, and cook for a few seconds until it begins to brown. Stir in the cabbage until it is coated in oil; cover the wok, and cook for 1 minute. Pour in the soy sauce, and cook and stir for another minute. Increase the heat to high, and stir in the Chinese cooking wine. Cook and stir until the cabbage is tender, about 2 minutes more.

CORN SALAD WITH RADICCHIO & RED ONION (from https://www.thedailymeal.com/corn-salad-radicchio-red-onion-recipe)
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
1/2 head of radicchio, sliced into 1/2-inch strips
Olive oil
3 teaspoons red wine vinegar
3 teaspoons sherry vinegar
2 ears fresh corn, kernels removed
Salt, to taste
4-5 leaves fresh basil, chiffonade
Combine the red onion and radicchio in a pan over medium-low heat and sauté with a drizzle of olive oil for about 5 minutes. Once the ingredients have cooked and softened slightly, add in the red wine and sherry vinegars. Sitr to combine and cook for 2-3 minutes, and then remove from heat and add to a medium-sized serving bowl.
Next, take the raw corn (I remove the kernels by running down the ear of corn with a chef’s knife) and add it to the serving bowl with the other ingredients. Toss again and season with salt to taste. To serve, garnish with fresh basil.  Serves 4.

TATSOI STIR FRY
Olive oil  
1 carrot, sliced
2 garlic cloves, minced
6 mushrooms, sliced
1 onion, chopped  
1 bunch tat soi
Saute garlic and onion in olive oil until translucent.   Add carrot slices and saute 3 minutes.  Add sliced tat soi stems and cook another minute.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Add mushroom slices and stir-fry another minute.   Add tat soi greens and steam with a cover for 3 minutes.   Add a little hot water, if necessary.   Serve hot.

Ext. Week 1: September 29 – October 5, 2019

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
Extended Fall CSA Share
WEEK #1
Sept. 29 – Oct. 5, 2019

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.  

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GREEN BEANS (Jade):  long, slender, deep green, filet bean with firm texture and good taste).  
-How to use: raw in salads, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, etc.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

BOK CHOY (Joi Choi): All members will receive this green written as bok choi, bak choy, a traditional stir-fry vegetable from China with a sweet and mild flavor; looks like white Swiss chard with the stems all attached at the bottom; considered a cool weather crop and part of the cabbage or turnip family.
-How to use: two vegetables in one–the leaves can be cooked like spinach, and the crisp stem can be eaten like celery or asparagus; excellent in stir-fries, soups, sauteed or eaten raw.
-How to store: store as you would any green–in a loose plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator.

CARROTS (Romance): blunt-tipped, deep orange roots with impressive flavor for a summer-harvested carrot; excellent greens this week!  
-How to use:  can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

SWEET CORN (Potawatomi):  It’s hard to believe we still have corn, but we do.  These yellow kernels come with excellent sweet flavor; contains a significant amount of vitamin A, B-complex, phosphorous and potassium along with vegetable protein. * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some earworms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.
-How to use: ears of corn can be steamed in 1-2 inches of water for 6-10 minutes, or drop ears into boiling water (enough to cover) for 4-7 minutes; ears of corn can also be roasted unhusked in the oven or outside grill for about 20 minutes.
-How to store: refrigerate with husks on, and use as soon as possible to retain sweetness and flavor.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm):  A bouquet per household of up to 15 stems will be part of your share, if you are able to come and pick it.   Extra bouquets cost $5.

ONIONS:  You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color) and Copra (medium-sized, dark yellow-skinned storage onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions).  
-How to use: can be grilled, sauteed, or roasted whole as a vegetable or chopped in salads, soups, and other dishes for flavor
-How to store:  will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

SWEET PEPPERS:  You will receive a variety of Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe), Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh), and Cornitos (exceptionally sweet, smaller versions of Carmen , but can be bright yellow or red when ripe; “bull’s horn” pepper type).
-How to use:  eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES (Yukon Gold):  yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried)
-How to store:  Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag

RADISHES (Bacchus):  stunning, purple, round radish with white inner flesh. Very good flavor and not too hot.
How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s!
How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

U-PICK RASPBERRIES (only available on the farm):  The harvest is slowing down, but you can still pick 1 pint as part of your share this week, if you are able to come out to the farm and pick it yourself.  $4 for any extra pints for members. Non members $5/pint.

SPINACH: crisp, dark green leaf–best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A and C; delicious flavor when juiced.
-How to use: toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

WATERMELON:  You will receive Starlight (10-12 pound round fruit; deep green with highly contrasting black stripes and pink flesh; excellent flavor with crisp texture) or Dark Belle (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor).
-How to use: slice, dice and serve as drinks, salads, or salsa.
-How to store: if melon seems not quite ripe, store at room temperature until sweet smell is coming from the soft, stem end; then store in the refrigerator.

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive 1 of each of the following: Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh; great stuffed with rice, breading, or soups) and Black Forest Kabocha (smaller size Kabocha; dark green, flat-round fruits; buttercup size with no button on end; orange flesh is medium-dry and sweet).
-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; boil or steam chunks for 15-20 minutes, or until tender (peel skins off “before” or “after“ cooked, but “after” is easiest when it’s cooled); mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store:  Keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. SAUERKRAUT PRESERVING WORKSHOP at the Washtenaw Food Hub sometime later this month.  DATE still to be determined:  Come make your own sauerkraut at the WASHTENAW FOOD HUB using Tantre Farm produce! Brinery Fermentation Expert, Melissa, will be leading this Farm-to-Fermentation workshop that will cover the basics of wild vegetable fermentation. Participants will take home a jar of fermenting sauerkraut made during the workshop. Please register with “SAUERKRAUT” in the subject line by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $10 fee for materials and other ingredients. 

2. VACATION HOLD or PICK UP RESCHEDULE: If you know that you are not able to pick up or need to reschedule pick up days during these coming 3 weeks for any reason, you can make those changes yourself by going into this link http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com and choosing “Schedule vacations or pick up location changes” under the “Member Actions” box on the left. You will need to do this a week ahead of time, if you know that you will not be picking up your share or you want to change your pick up date or location, or email us to make changes.  Please make a strong effort to PICK UP ALL OF YOUR SHARES in the next few weeks.  If you miss a share pick up, it is available at the farm ONLY for that day and 1 day after, but please let us know ASAP, so we know what to do with your share.  

3. PRORATED SHARES: Those of you with prorated shares should know that you will all receive the online newsletter every week and also Pick Up Reminders the night before you are scheduled even though it might not be your week to pick up.  This is all just computer automated, and it can’t be undone for individuals.  Just FYI.

4. THANKSGIVING CSA on November 23:  This CSA is NOT open for registration just yet, but we wanted to let you know to “save the date”, since it will open soon.  A more detailed email notice will come to you in the next week.  This share is a one time pick up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $125.  This share will be available for pick up on the Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon, at Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M, and other locations TBD.

5. BRING BAGS:  We encourage you to bring cloth/plastic/paper bags, coolers, or totes to take extra produce home that is on the side besides getting the share box if you are at any of the sites that have “share add-ons” in addition to your share box.  If anyone has piles and piles of GROCERY BAGS ONLY, please donate them to any site you pick up.

6. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.

RECIPES

SCALLOPED SQUASH AND POTATOES (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure)
3 cups dry winter squash (kabocha), peeled and cut into chunks
2 cups diced potatoes
1/3 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped cooked ham
1/4 cup flour
1 Tbsp chopped parsley
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1 1/3 cups whole milk
2 Tbsp butter
Place half of squash and potatoes in a greased 1 1/2-quart casserole dish.  Sprinkle half the amount of ham and onions.  Whisk together flour, parsley, salt, pepper, and nutmeg with milk.  Pour half the mixture over vegetables.  Dot with half the butter.  Repeat layers.  Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  Uncover and bake 10-15 minutes, or until vegetables tender.

EMERALD SOUFFLE (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC)  Serves 3
1 lb bok choy
2 Tbsp butter
2 Tbsp whole wheat flour
1 cup evaporated or soy milk
3 eggs
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1/2 tsp salt
Pinch of black pepper
Pinch of ground mace
3 large egg whites
6 sprigs of parsley or chervil
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Grease an 8-inch souffle dish.  Steam bok choy until very tender, about 8-10 minute.  Drain and chop in food processor.  Set aside.  Melt butter in medium saucepan over low heat.  Add flour and cook 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Whisk in milk and bring to a boil, stirring constantly.  Remove from heat; stir in bok choy, 3 eggs, cheese, salt, pepper, and mace.  Set aside.  Whisk egg whites until soft peaks form; gently fold into bok choy mixture.  Pour into souffle dish; smooth surface.  Bake until golden brown, about 45 minutes.  Garnish with parsley or chervil.  Serve immediately.  

RADISH TOP PESTO (adapted from www.achefskitchen.com)
For the pesto: 
4 cups radish tops (packed), washed and dried
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
Juice of 1/2 a lemon
1/2 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted in a cast iron pan
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil plus more as needed
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Put first 6 ingredients in a food processor and puree until whipped and smooth, adding more oil, if needed. (If you don’t have a food processor, an immersion blender, a blender, or even a mortar & pestle will do the trick.) Put this pesto on pasta, bread, sandwiches, etc.

2019: Week 18, September 22 – 28

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #18 (LAST WEEK)
Sept. 22-28, 2019
If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.            

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.  In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GREEN BEANS (E-Z Pick):  a round, tender, dark green, snap bean with good sweet flavor. See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS: round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and medium-tall, red-veined green leaves.  See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BROCCOLI or CAULIFLOWER:  You will receive Gypsy Broccoli (deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; (well-domed and uniform with a medium-small, bead size and medium-sized stem) or Flame Star Cauliflower (pastel orange cauliflower with 25 more times the beta carotene than white cauliflower).  See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NAPA CABBAGE: crinkly, thickly veined leaves, which are cream-colored with celadon green tips; unlike the strong-flavored waxy leaves on round cabbage heads, these are thin, crisp, and delicately mild; good source of vitamin A, folic acid, and potassium.  See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Romance): blunt-tipped, deep orange roots with impressive flavor for a summer-harvested carrot; excellent greens this week!  See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NO CORN:  We were expecting corn for this week and discovered that this generation isn’t quite ready, but if you are continuing with the Extended Fall shares, we should have some for next week.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm):  You may pick 1 bouquet of 16 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm one last time or the first time, if you haven’t made it out to the farm until now.  $5 for extra bouquet.

GARLIC:  a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, bolstering the immune system, etc.   See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS:  In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.  You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following:
-Cilantro: the flat, delicate, lacy-edged leaves and stems of the coriander plant, which look a lot like flat-leaf parsley, but has a distinctive, almost citrus fragrance that lends itself to highly spiced foods, such as tacos, salsas, soups, stews, and salads.
-Lemon Balm: these fragrant lemon-minty leaves make a delicate herbal tea, served hot or cold; good addition to lettuce or fruit salads and ice cream; nicely paired with grilled fish or lamb and tossed with steamed vegetables; also aids in depression and nausea.
-Italian Flat-Leaf Parsley: Flat leaf or Italian is used primarily in cooking because of its more robust flavor; flat, glossy, dark green leaves have a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces.
-Sage (an herb from an evergreen shrub in the mint family with long, narrow, grayish-green leaves; a musky aroma and a warm and spicy taste; used in making sausages, stews, breads, and teas; enhances meats, vegetables, salads, pickles, and cheese)
-French Sorrel: slightly tart, lemon-flavored green shaped like spinach; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces; can be used in omelets, breads, dressings, or cooked as a side dish.

LETTUCE:  You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce.   See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color and will store for six months or more under proper conditions).  See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ASIAN PEARS:  this apple-shaped fruit has a speckled olive green to pale yellow, smooth skin with white-flesh that is sweet, firm, crisp, juicy and aromatic; favored across the world for their crunchy texture and sweet flesh.  
-How to use: best eaten raw or baked, can be sliced in salads, hot cereals, yogurts, stuffings, sauces, or  butters.
-How to store: ripening can occur either at room temperature or in the refrigerator; remove from refrigerator several days before eating

SWEET PEPPERS:  You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe), Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh), Cornitos (exceptionally sweet, smaller versions of Carmen , but can be bright yellow or red when ripe; “bull’s horn” pepper type),  Lipstick (sweet, cone or heart-shaped peppers with juicy, thick flesh; delicious in salads and salsas, but also great for roasting) or Green Bell Peppers (large blocky cells with fruity, slightly sweet flavor with green skin). See Week 13 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES:  You will receive Yukon Gold  (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting) and Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads). See Week 8 newsletter for usage/storage tips.

RADISHES (Pink Beauty):  pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor.  See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

U-PICK RASPBERRIES (only available on the farm):  Come to the farm and pick a pint for yourself as part of your share.  $4/extra pint.

WATERMELON:  You may choose from Sorbet Swirl (tasty sweet flesh has beautiful pastel swirls of red and yellow; average 10 pound fruits are round to oval with 8-inches diameter)., Sunshine (8-10 pound oval-rounded fruit; green-striped shell with bright yellow flesh, which is brittle, juicy, and very sweet), OR Dark Belle (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH (Butternut): light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash.  See Week 15 for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. LAST WEEK OF THE SUMMER CSA, so RETURN YOUR SHARE BOXES: This means Sept. 25 (Wed.), Sept. 27 (Fri.), and Sept. 28 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares, but please feel free to continue with our Extended Fall CSA program.  See below for details.

2. STILL ROOM: “EXTENDED FALL CSA” SHARE REGISTRION IS OPEN:  This year we are providing a 4-week share, which runs from Sept. 29 – Oct. 26 for $140 celebrating all the bounty of the fall vegetables!  The link for online registration is http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.  Please sign up by Saturday, Sept. 28 for all 4 weeks.  Please go to our website for more information.  We are prorating these shares as well, so if you need to miss a week of the Extended Fall CSA, just send us an email, and we will register you for the weeks you will receive a share.  Hope to share more of this abundant fall harvest with you throughout October!  Tell your friends and family!!  Due to outside exposure of potentially cold-damaging temperatures in October, we will not have Fall Shares at the Chelsea Farmers Market or at MOVE, since we have no way to protect these shares from the Oct. elements, so please choose alternate pick up locations.  All other sites are the same.  We might add AGRICOLE as a NEW pick up location, so more details soon.

3. LAST ONE!  EDIBLE & MEDICINAL PLANT WALK Sept. 25 from 6-8 PM: We are offering our last Wed. plant walk at Tantre Farm with the guidance of our local foraging expert, Rachel Mifsud. On these leisurely walks we will be looking for edible, medicinal, and otherwise useful plants and mushrooms. The cost is $15 for Tantre CSA members or $20 for nonmembers. Kids 12 and under FREE! You may bring cash, check or pre-register at https://squareup.com/store/willforageforfood

4. THANKSGIVING CSA on November 23:  This CSA is NOT open for registration just yet, because we are finalizing some new Pick Up locations, but we wanted to let you know to “save the date”, since it will open soon.  A more detailed email notice will come to you in the next week or so.  This share is a one time pick up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $125.  This share will be available for pick up on the Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon, at Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M, and other locations TBD.

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Farm (Wed.)—10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.)—6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —10 A.M. To 7 P.M.
*Farm (Fri.)—2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—10 A.M. to 6 P.M.

BUILDING BRIDGES WITH CARBON
by Richard and Deb

For all plants that grow, the bridge for soil minerals from soil to root is the carbon.  Carbon creates a very efficient way for the minerals to flow into the plant.  Without this ancient carbon of decomposed plant and animal matter, the plant can not absorb  nutrients and soil minerals as efficiently.  The more carbon that is present in the soil, the better and more available the nutrients are for the plant.  For those of us who grow food, we are elementally dependent on the soil carbon cycle for the health of our gardens and our farms.  

Even at this moment as we look out this window and listen to the ducks, which quack and quack incessantly as the breeze blows through the trees, our minds are carried away from the farm. We are wondering about all of the severe storms on the coasts and in the ocean, all the burning tundra of the north and all of the burning Amazon to the south, and we wonder how soon before so many more millions of people are displaced from their homes by severe weather brought on by too much carbon in the atmosphere.  We are so dependent on carbon in the soil that it is ironic that the biggest environmental crisis on the planet is being caused by the carbon in the air.  The rapidly accumulating carbon in the atmosphere seems to be causing the planet to heat up just like any farmer’s hoop house, which in turn is causing the ice caps to melt, changing ecosystems, changing weather patterns, and changing growing zones.  This quickly advancing omnicide of all life seems to be caused by excess, human-produced carbon in the atmosphere. How do we move to a zero emissions culture and economy?  Perhaps we should just crawl into a cave and take a vow of poverty, chastity, and humility, sitting in silence, and let the earth recover from all our extractive, industrial greed.  Perhaps we could practice deep diaphragmatic breathing and meditation to heat our homes and focus our minds away from meaningless consumption.  When can we invite the deep mystery of our being back into our consciousness and turn away from this frivolous world of money and distraction?

We are concerned for the welfare of all beings.  We would like to encourage each person to look deeply within and make healthy choices for ourselves and our Mother Earth going forward.  We will try to do the same. We are thankful to this earth and to all nature for providing us with so much sustenance. We are also thankful to you, the community of people who support local farms!  We would especially like to express our heartfelt appreciation to our farm crew for all their hard work and long hours this past season even with a much smaller staff, so thanks to Chizo, Donn, Geoff, Tristan, Jordan, Andy, Mary Kate, Kirt, Mark, John, Kaitlin, and Lori!! Please feel free to contact us throughout the rest of fall and winter for any fall storage produce at the Farm or come visit us at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market every Wed. (until December) and Sat. (year round), Chelsea Farmers Market (every Sat. through Oct.), the new Agricole in Chelsea, Argus Farm Stop on Liberty or on Packard in Ann Arbor, and the People’s Food Coop in Ann Arbor throughout the winter. Hope to share our harvest with you again for our Fall/Winter 2019 CSAs or next Summer CSA for 2020.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipe” after it, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!  Lots and lots of ideas!

2019: Week 17, September 15 – 21

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #17
Sept. 15-21, 2019

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.  In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

FRESH BEANS:  You will receive E-Z Pick (a round, tender, dark green, snap bean with good sweet flavor) and Marvel of Venice (famous Italian, Romano-like heirloom with large, sweet, juicy, 8-9 inch long, wide, flat yellow pods) . See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BOK CHOY (Joi Choi): All members will receive this green written as bok choi, bak choy, a traditional stir-fry vegetable from China with a sweet and mild flavor; looks like white Swiss chard with the stems all attached at the bottom; considered a cool weather crop and part of the cabbage or turnip family.
-How to use: two vegetables in one–the leaves can be cooked like spinach, and the crisp stem can be eaten like celery or asparagus; excellent in stir-fries, soups, sauteed or eaten raw.
-How to store: store as you would any green–in a loose plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator.

BROCCOLI:  deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable.  See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Romance): blunt-tipped, deep orange roots with impressive flavor for a summer-harvested carrot; excellent greens this week!  See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips and yummy “Carrot Top Soup” recipe.

SWEET CORN (Potawatomi):  yellow kernels with excellent sweet flavor.  * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some ear worms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.  See Week 16 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

DAIKON RADISH (Alpine): the smooth, attractive roots are white with green shoulders; looks like an overgrown green carrot, but with a slightly mild radish taste; crunchy and sweet texture; good macrobiotic root that is good for the gut; the most common type grown in Korea.
-How to use: for fresh use, pickling, and storage; greens are also edible and can be used like any other green.
-How to store: not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks in refrigerator.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm):  This week you can pick up to 15 stems for as part of your share.  You may want to bring a vase/jar to keep your flowers fresh going home, but we will have donated yogurt containers to fill with water as well.  Your bouquet is part of your share, although you may always feel free to make a donation to pay for seeds, if you like. $5 for extra bouquet.

NO HERBS:  We are letting our smaller patches of herbs rest for another week, so we will have enough herbs for next week.

LETTUCE:  You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce.   See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color and will store for six months or more under proper conditions).  See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET PEPPERS:  You will receive Cornitos (exceptionally sweet, smaller versions of Carmen sweet pepper, but can be bright yellow or red when ripe; “bull’s horn” pepper type and tasty any way you eat them — raw, cooked, sliced, diced, sautéed, stuffed, grilled, and especially fire-roasted, which caramelizes the sugars and is so delicious!  See Week 13 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES:  You will receive Yukon Gold  (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting) and Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried). See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

U-PICK RASPBERRIES (only available on the farm):  Come to the farm and pick a pint for yourself as part of your share.  $4/extra pint.

TOMATOES:  The tomatoes are finally thinning out, but you will still receive Verona (similar to Juliet, but with even tastier, somewhat plumper, deep red “cocktail plum” fruits; good in sauces and in salads, excellent dehydrated!) and San Marzano (early, large classic Italian Roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON:  You may choose from Mini Love (sweet and firm, oval-round fruits avg. 3–5 lb. Distinctive, bright green rind with dark green stripes and dense, bright red flesh) or Sunshine (8-10 pound oval-rounded fruit; green-striped shell with bright yellow flesh, which is brittle, juicy, and very sweet), OR Dark Belle (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. STILL ROOM: SALADS COOKING CLASS on Sept. 18 from 6 – 8:30 PM at Tantre Farm:  Please join us THIS WEDNESDAY for another great cooking class on SALADS. CSA member, Laenne Thompson, will share a flavorful assortment of recipes for hot summer nights using mostly ingredients from Tantre Farm’s weekly share box.  We will break into teams to prepare them, and enjoy a feast of our creations! There will be a $10 fee for materials and handouts for each class.  Please register with SALADS in the Subject Line and your NAME, PHONE NUMBER, and E-MAIL ADDRESS in the body of the email. 

2. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be this coming Sunday, Sept. 22, from 1-4 P.M.  Please feel free to bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass.  Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost.  You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, go on a wagon ride, listen to a local musician, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home, such as a pumpkin, a winter squash, and a flower bouquet.  

3. EDIBLE & MEDICINAL PLANT WALK SERIES Sept. 25 from 6-8 PM (Last Wednesday of every month May through October)
We are offering a monthly plant walk at Tantre Farm with the guidance of our local foraging expert, Rachel Mifsud. On these leisurely walks we will be looking for edible, medicinal, and otherwise useful plants and mushrooms. The cost is $15 for Tantre CSA members or $20 for nonmembers. Kids 12 and under FREE! You may bring cash, check or pre-register at https://squareup.com/store/willforageforfood

4. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES:  The summer season ends next week!  This means Sept. 25 (Wed.), Sept. 27 (Fri.), and Sept. 28 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares, but please feel free to continue with our Extended Fall CSA program.  See below for details.

5. “EXTENDED FALL CSA” SHARE REGISTRION IS OPEN:  This year we are providing a 4-week share, which runs from Sept. 29 – Oct. 26 for $140 celebrating all the bounty of the fall vegetables!  The link for online registration is http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.  Please sign up by Saturday, Sept. 28 for all 4 weeks.  Please go to our website for more information.  We are prorating these shares as well, so if you need to miss a week of the Extended Fall CSA, just send us an email, and we will register you for the weeks you will receive a share.  Hope to share more of this abundant fall harvest with you throughout October!  Tell your friends and family!!  Due to outside exposure of potentially cold-damaging temperatures in October, we will not have Fall Shares at the Chelsea Farmers Market or at MOVE, since we have no way to protect these shares from the Oct. elements, so please choose alternate pick up locations.  All other sites are the same.

6. THANKSGIVING CSA on November 23:  This CSA is NOT open for registration just yet, but we wanted to let you know to “save the date”, since it will open soon.  A more detailed email notice will come to you in the next week or so.  This share is a one time pick up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $125.  This share will be available for pick up on the Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon or at Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M.

7. THANKS FOR COMING TO THE TOMATO PRESERVING WORKSHOP!  During the workshop our enthusiastic participants managed to put up over 60 quarts of canned tomatoes and 10 trays of dehydrated Green Zebra, Roma, and cherry tomatoes during our 3-hour workshop. This is an incredible amount of help from our community of CSA members for our winter preservation and our farm crew that we feed throughout the seasons!  All went home with 1 jar of canned tomatoes. Thanks to Noelle Dronen, who facilitated the workshop and all the hardworking participants. Many went home with their own box of tomatoes to preserve as well.  Happy canning!!

8. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-pick Flowers – 15 stems with your share and extra bouquets for $5 for Members.  Nonmembers–$6/bouquet
**U-pick Fall Raspberries – 1 pint FREE if you can make it out to the farm to pick.  Extra pints are $4/pint for members. Nonmembers–$5/pint.
**U-pick Tomatoes – some tomato varieties are gone, but there still are a few tomatoes ready for picking.  Members–$0.50/lb. Nonmembers–$0.75/lb.

9. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Farm (Wed.)—10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.)—6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —10 A.M. To 7 P.M.
*Farm (Fri.)—2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—10 A.M. to 6 P.M.

RECIPES

BRAISED ROMANO BEANS (from https://gluttonforlife.com/2013/09/6/spilling_the_beans) Serves 4.
1 pound Romano yellow beans
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 small shallots or 1 red onion, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small fennel bulb, trimmed and roughly chopped (retain fresh fronds)
1/2 pound tomatoes (about 3 small), roughly chopped
2 tablespoons chopped fennel fronds
1 teaspoon ground toasted fennel seeds
sea salt & freshly ground pepper
fennel pollen, for optional garnish
         Rinse and trim beans, as needed, discarding any stems. Heat olive oil over medium heat in a large, heavy saucepan or Dutch oven. Add shallots, garlic and a fat pinch of sea salt and sauté until lightly golden. Add fennel bulb and cook for a few moments, then tomatoes and fennel fronds. Cook, stirring often, until everything is soft and melded, about 15 minutes. Add beans and stir to coat, then pour water over to cover, about 3 cups. Bring to a gentle simmer, then cover and cook over low heat until beans are quite tender but not mushy, about 45 minutes. Serve hot or at room temperature, drizzled with good olive oil, some flaky sea salt and a shower of fennel pollen, if you have it.

BRAISED DAIKON (from Winter Harvest Cookbook)  Serves 4.
1 Daikon radish, peeled and diced
2 Tbsp light cooking oil
1 tsp sugar (or honey)
1 1/2 Tbsp soy sauce
Put Daikon in saucepan, cover with water, and boil 5 minutes.  Drain well.  Heat skillet, add oil, and stir-fry Daikon for 2 minutes.  Add sugar and soy sauce; stir-fry another minute.  Add 1/4 cup water, cover, and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until Daikon is tender, but not mushy, about 30 minutes.  Serve hot.

2019: Week 16, September 8 – 14

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #16
Sept. 8-14, 2019

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.  In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GREEN BEANS:  You will receive E-Z Pick (a round, tender, dark green, snap bean with good sweet flavor). See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Potawatomi):  AND WHAT WE ALL HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR… CORN!  See feature article! These yellow kernels come with excellent sweet flavor.  Corn is often referred to as maize and is an ancient staple food of the Americas; everything on the corn plant can be used: “husks” for Tamales, the “silk” for medicinal tea, the “kernels” for food, and the “stalks” for fodder; contains a significant amount of vitamin A, B-complex, phosphorous and potassium along with vegetable protein. * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some earworms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.
-How to use: ears of corn can be steamed in 1-2 inches of water for 6-10 minutes, or drop ears into boiling water (enough to cover) for 4-7 minutes; ears of corn can also be roasted unhusked in the oven or outside grill for about 20 minutes.
-How to store: refrigerate with husks on, and use as soon as possible to retain sweetness and flavor.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm):  This week you can pick up to 15 stems for as part of your share.  You may want to bring a vase/jar to keep your flowers fresh going home, but we will have donated yogurt containers to fill with water as well.  Your bouquet is part of your share, although you may always feel free to make a donation to pay for seeds, if you like.  

NO HERBS:  We are letting our smaller patches of herbs rest for another week.

KALE:  You will receive Red Russian Kale (the stems are purple, and leaves are deep gray-green, purple-veined, flat, non-curled, and tooth-edged).  See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE:  You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce.   See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Cipollini (a traditional Italian onion known for its flat, oval shape and delicately mild, sweet flavor; ranges in size from 1-3 inches; used for pickling and to season a wide variety of dishes and especially good grilled on a skewer) and Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color and will store for six months or more under proper conditions).  See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS:  You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe), Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh) or Lipstick (sweet, cone or heart-shaped peppers with juicy, thick flesh; delicious in salads and salsas, but also great for roasting). See Week 13 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES:  You will receive Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads) and Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried).   See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

U-PICK RASPBERRIES (only available on the farm):  Come to the farm and pick a pint for yourself as part of your share.  

TOMATOES:  You will receive any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are very large, firm, nice red color and good taste),  Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads),  Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), including San Marzano (early, large classic Italian Roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste), and Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful)  See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON/HONEYDEW:  You may choose from Mini Love (sweet and firm, oval-round fruits avg. 3–5 lb. Distinctive, bright green rind with dark green stripes and dense, bright red flesh) or Sunshine (8-10 pound oval-rounded fruit; green-striped shell with bright yellow flesh, which is brittle, juicy, and very sweet), OR Honey Blonde Honeydew (flavorful, yellow-skinned honeydew; oval fruit with sweet, delicious, orange flesh). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. PIZZA PARTY FUNDRAISER on Sept. 8 was a HUGE SUCCESS!  Thank you so much for all of you who joined us at the farm for a farm tour, pizzas, salads, door prizes, bonfire, etc. to support farm to school education and school garden support for Agrarian Adventure.  We are so grateful for the turnout and the generous donations.  We were able to raise over $1000, thanks to you!  This will help support funds for our Farmer in the Classroom coordinator this fall.  If anyone was not able to attend, but would still like to help us out with a donation for continuing our programs in the spring, please feel free to go to the donation button on the website at www.agrarianadventure.org.  We really appreciate it!

2. STILL ROOM: TOMATO PRESERVING WORKSHOP on Sept. 15 from 1 – 4 PM at Tantre Farm:   Former Tantre intern, Noelle Dronen, will facilitate mostly how to can tomatoes, but also some demonstration will be on dehydrating and freezing tomatoes.  There will be active participation and “take-home” samples for those attending.  Please bring a Quart Size Canning Jar with a lid.  You can also buy one from us for $1.  Please register with your Name, Phone Number, and E-mail Address in the body of the email to us.   Bulk tomatoes will be available for you to buy.  This is a great time for canning, freezing, or dehydrating!  $5 for CSA members and $10 for nonmembers.

3. SALADS COOKING CLASS on Sept. 18 from 6 – 8:30 PM at Tantre Farm:  Please join us for another great cooking class on SALADS. CSA member, Laenne Thompson, will share a flavorful assortment of recipes for hot summer nights using mostly ingredients from Tantre Farm’s weekly share box.  We will break into teams to prepare them, and enjoy a feast of our creations! There will be a $10 fee for materials and handouts for each class.  Please register with COOKING CLASS in the Subject Line and your NAME, PHONE NUMBER, and E-MAIL ADDRESS in the body of the email.  We have 15 spaces available, so let us know if you’re interested in joining us for a special night of cooking and eating together.

4. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be Sunday, Sept. 22, from 1-4 P.M.  Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass.  Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost.  You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, listen to a local musician, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash and a flower bouquet.  

5. “EXTENDED FALL CSA” SHARE REGISTRATION IS OPEN:  This year we are providing a 4-week share, which runs from Sept. 29 – Oct. 26 for $140 celebrating all the bounty of the fall vegetables!  The link for online registration is http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com .  Please sign up by Saturday, Sept. 28 for all 4 weeks.  Please go to our website for more information.  We are prorating these shares as well, so if you need to miss a week of the Extended Fall CSA, just send us an email, and we will register you for the weeks you will receive a share.  Hope to share more of this abundant fall harvest with you throughout October!  Tell your friends and family!!  Due to outside exposure of potentially cold-damaging temperatures in October, we will not have Fall Shares at the Chelsea Farmers Market or at MOVE, since we have no way to protect these shares from the Oct. elements, so please choose alternate pick up locations.  All other sites are the same.

6. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES:  The end is drawing near.  This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks.  That means Sept. 25 (Wed.), Sept. 27 (Fri.), and Sept. 28 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

7. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-pick Flowers – 15 stems with your share and extra bouquets for $4 for members.  Nonmembers $5/bouquet
**U-pick Fall Raspberries – 1 pint FREE if you can make it out to the farm to pick.  Extra pints are $4/pint. Nonmember are $5/pint.
**U-pick Tomatoes – many tomato varieties are ready for picking.  Members–$0.50/lb. Nonmembers–$0.75/lb.

8. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page.  These sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited”. Please always email ahead to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Farm (Wed.)—10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.)—6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —10 A.M. To 7 P.M.
*Farm (Fri.)—2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—10 A.M. to 6 P.M.

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
By Deb and Richard

As the days of summer have finally shortened to autumn days, we begin each day in the dark sorting tomatoes in the barn, sweeping the packing shed, and this week finally for the first time this summer, we pick corn for the CSA shares!  With a crew of 6 people and a pickup truck we head down to the field with four 20-bushel boxes.  We fill each box until it is almost overflowing, giving us 80 bushels of sweet corn that we haul back to the packing shed to sort the ones that have been gnawed by raccoons and pecked by birds, or ones that are too small and unusable by anyone except for the pigs.  
The 20 pigs (some over 300 pounds, some only 40 pounds) are only too happy to eat the kernels, cob, husk and all, as well as any stray worms.  Snuffling around in their muddy pasture, mixing whatever is left with the dirt to complement their sweet corn entree, they are in piggy heaven!  It is very interesting to watch them push the corn through the dirt, nuzzling it, covering it, uncovering it, and enjoying each succulent bite.  These hogs are very excited when fed the culled sweet corn or any other “ugly produce”– pushing, squealing, with open mouthed tusks ready for the very first bite.  
Consequently, after 25 raccoons, 3 opossums, and 1 skunk later, we are finding that we finally have enough sweet corn to harvest for the market and the CSA after 5 weeks of diligent trapping and relocating these voracious eaters.  Good tidings for hogs; good tidings for CSA members!  We should have corn for the last 3 weeks of the Summer season!  If there is any interest in buying it in bulk, please let us know, since now we should have an abundance.

RECIPES

GRILLED CORN ON THE COB (from Good-for-You Garlic Cookbook)
4 ears of corn
2 tsp butter
1 tsp dried marjoram
3/4 tsp cayenne pepper
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1/2 tsp salt
Dash of paprika
Remove silk from corn, keeping husks intact.  Soak corn in water for 20 minutes.  Peel back husks to rub each ear of corn with 1/2 teaspoon butter.  Then sprinkle with marjoram, cayenne, garlic, salt, and paprika.  Pull husks up to cover corn and grill for 10-15 minutes, turning often.

2019: Week 15, September 1 – 7

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #15
Sept. 1-7, 2019

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.  In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GREEN BEANS:  You will receive E-Z Pick (a round, tender, dark green, snap bean with good sweet flavor). See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Purple Haze): bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade. See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm):  Every summer we plant a variety of flowers for drying or fresh bouquets.  We welcome  you to the farm to pick your flowers on any day of the week until the first frost, but please contact us if it will be on other days besides Wednesdays and Fridays, so we can make sure to be around to show you where to go.  This week you can pick up to 10 stems, since the flowers are just starting.  Please make sure that you and your kids stay on the paths without stepping into/over the flower beds to harvest, which compacts the soil.  You may want to bring a vase/jar to keep your flowers fresh going home, but we will have donated yogurt containers to fill with water as well.  Your bouquet is part of your share, although you may always feel free to make a donation to pay for seeds, if you like.  Extra bouquets cost $4 per bunch.

GARLIC:  a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, bolstering the immune system, etc.   See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS:  In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.  
You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 4 options:
-French Sorrel: slightly tart, lemon-flavored green shaped like spinach; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces; can be used in omelets, breads, dressings, or cooked as a side dish.

-Italian Flat-leaf Parsley: flat, glossy, dark green leaves have a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as with fish, poultry, and pork.

-Red Rubin Basil – dark purple, Italian large leaf type; slightly stronger flavor than sweet basil with hints of clove and ginger, more savory than sweet; excellent in vinaigrettes, as a garnish, or in salads, and also used as a purple pesto; best eaten raw as cooking changes its flavor and color. Do NOT refrigerate, and store in jar of water on counter.  How to use: layer slices of ripe, heirloom tomatoes and fresh mozzarella with purple basil leaves and top with sea salt, black pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil.  Make “Strawberry-Basil Mojitos” by muddling 1 cup of fresh strawberries, 1/2 cup of purple basil, 1/4 cup of fresh mint, and 8 limes (sliced), then add 1 cup of simple syrup and 2 cups of rum.  Serve over ice and top off with club soda.  Garnish with more basil.

-Lemon Basil—narrow, ovate, light green leaves producing a lemon scent & strong citrus flavor; use fresh or dried in vinegars, fish, chicken, vegetables and soups; common herb found within Thai, Indonesian and several Middle Eastern region cuisines. Do NOT refrigerate, and store in jar of water on counter.  Excellent informational link for lemon basil: http://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Lemon_Basil_152.php

KALE:  You will receive Red Curly (well-ruffled, curly green with red stems with all leaves turning red after a frost) or Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”).  See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE:  You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce.   See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS (Cipollini): a traditional Italian onion known for its flat, oval shape and delicately mild, sweet flavor; ranges in size from 1-3 inches; used for pickling and to season a wide variety of dishes and especially good grilled on a skewer.  See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS:  You will receive Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh) or Lipstick (sweet, cone or heart-shaped peppers with juicy, thick flesh; delicious in salads and salsas, but also great for roasting). See Week 13 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES:  You will receive Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!) and Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).   See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

U-PICK RASPBERRIES (only available on the farm):  The sweet fall red raspberries have been ripening again with the rainy, warm weather, so you may pick 1 pint as part of your share, if you are able to come out to the farm and pick it yourself this week.  Extra pints are $4/pint.

TOMATOES:  You will receive any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are very large, firm, nice red color and good taste),  Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads),  Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), including San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste), and Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful)  See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON:  You will receive Mini Love (sweet and firm, oval-round fruits avg. 3–5 lb. Distinctive, bright green rind with dark green stripes and dense, bright red flesh) or Sunshine (8-10 pound oval-rounded fruit; green-striped shell with bright yellow flesh, which is brittle, juicy, and very sweet).  See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH: Everyone will receive Spaghetti Squash (3-5-pounds, pale yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size, only mildly sweet with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh).
-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet).
-How to store:  Keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. STILL ROOM:  PIZZA PARTY FUNDRAISER on Sept. 8 from 5 – 8 PM at Tantre Farm:  Support Farm to School Education with this end-of-summer Pizza Party at Tantre Farm! The Agrarian Adventure and Tantre Farm come together for an evening of tasty local food, friendly local farmers, and community building. Plan on a farm tour, fun give aways, and amazing earth oven pizzas and farm salads. Proceeds go to The Agrarian Adventure, which funds in-school programs for K-12 students in Washtenaw County, including Farmer In the Classroom and School Garden support. Tickets on a sliding scale: $15 – $30.  Please RSVP by Thursday if possible, by following the link to purchase yours! https://www.eventbrite.com/e/agrarian-adventure-pizza-fundraiser-tickets-66811144933

2. CORRECTION to Sept. 15- TOMATO PRESERVING WORKSHOP  from 1 – 4 PM at Tantre Farm:    This is a perfect hands-on followup for the Agricole Introduction to Preserving class on Aug. 29. Former Tantre intern, Noelle Dronen, will facilitate mostly how to can tomatoes, but also some demonstration will be on dehydrating and freezing tomatoes.  There will be active participation and “take-home” samples for those attending.  Please bring a Quart Size Canning Jar with a lid.  You can also buy one from us for $1.  Please register with your Name, Phone Number, and E-mail Address in the body of the email to us.   Bulk tomatoes will be available for you to buy.  This is a great time for canning, freezing, or dehydrating!  $5 for CSA members and $10 for nonmembers.

3. SALADS COOKING CLASS on Sept. 18 from 6 – 8:30 PM at Tantre Farm:  Please join us for another great cooking class on SALADS. CSA member, Laenne Thompson, will share a flavorful assortment of recipes for hot summer nights using mostly ingredients from Tantre Farm’s weekly share box.  We will break into teams to prepare them, and enjoy a feast of our creations! There will be a $10 fee for materials and handouts for each class.  Please register with COOKING CLASS in the Subject Line and your NAME, PHONE NUMBER, and E-MAIL ADDRESS in the body of the email.  We have 15 spaces available, so let us know if you’re interested in joining us for a special night of cooking and eating together.

4. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be Sunday, Sept. 22, from 1-4 P.M.  Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass.  Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost.  You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, listen to a local musician, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home, such as a pumpkin, a winter squash, and a flower bouquet.  

5. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED:  We have plenty of weeds to pull.  If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm, come join us.  Please contact us any day of the week or evenings.

6. WANTED: TOMATO PICKERS!!   Is there anyone interested in helping us pick tomatoes any weekday morning for the next few weeks, but especially on Tuesday and Friday mornings.  We will even feed you a homemade, farm-cooked lunch at 12:30 PM.  We are a little short-handed, so please contact us.

7. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES:  The end is drawing near.  This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks.  That means Sept. 25 (Wed.), Sept. 27 (Fri.), and Sept. 28 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

8. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
*U-pick Flowers – 10 stems for 1 bouquet/week as part of your share if you pick it at the farm.  Extra bouquets are $4.
*U-pick Fall Raspberries – 1 pint FREE if you can make it out to the farm to pick.  Extra pints are $4/pint for Members.  $5/pint for  Nonmembers.
*U-pick Tomatoes – many tomato varieties are ready for picking.  Members–$0.50/lb. Nonmembers $0.75/lb.

9. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page.  These sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited”. Please always email ahead to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Farm (Wed.)—10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.)—6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —10 A.M. To 7 P.M.
*Farm (Fri.)—2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—10 A.M. to 6 P.M.

RECIPES

ITALIAN-STYLE SPAGHETTI SQUASH (from Farm Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure) Makes 6 servings
1/2 medium spaghetti squash, seeded
2 Tbsp. Water
2 cups cut up tomatoes, cooked for about 10 – 20 minutes (or 1  14-oz. can Italian-style stewed tomatoes, drained)
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Place squash, cut side down, in a microwave-safe baking dish.   Add water. Cover and microwave on high 10-14 minutes until tender (or bake in a traditional oven at 350 degrees for about 20-30 minutes). Use fork to shred pulp into strands into a dish. Add stewed tomatoes, toss.  Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese, and serve.