2017 Thanksgiving Share

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
THANKSGIVING SHARE
November 18, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING, EVERYONE!
For the cold, gray, sodden upcoming months we can take refuge in roasting roots as they waft sweet smells out of the oven. We can take refuge in these roots and the big heads of cabbage and cauliflower for crunchy salad making. We can take refuge in the gift of the sun, the moon, and the earth in the form of hard squashes. When we find ourselves at the end of a dreary, gray week we can roast a squash, the perfect symmetry of the sun, the moon, and the earth together–radiating the calm, slow release of the sweet starches into our body mind.

Please feel free to give us a call or e-mail throughout the late fall and early winter, if you are interested in more greens, squash, potatoes, radishes, turnips, spinach, onions, garlic, etc. and are willing to pick up your order at the farm. After the Thanksgiving Distribution we are planning on being at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market on the following Wednesday, Nov. 22, for any last minute Thanksgiving purchases, but NOT on Sat. Nov. 25. We are hoping to continue coming to the Ann Arbor market on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout December and then only Saturdays for January through April. We will continue to be at the Chelsea Winter Farmers Market on Nov. 25 and into the following 2 Saturdays of December. If you have “liked” us on Tantre Farm’s Facebook page, you will know when we are coming and what we are bringing, since we will try to keep you updated. Also, throughout the fall and winter, we will deliver our produce into Ann Arbor for the People’s Food Coop and Argus Farm Stop on Liberty and Packard.

If you are interested in our Summer CSA shares for 2018, our online registration will start soon. Just check our website. We will be sending you a separate email as well to let you know when registration opens.

The vegetables for this last distribution have been compiled into 2 big (1-3/4 bushel) boxes. Your herbs of parsley and rosemary will be on the side. You will also receive 2 jars of The Brinery’s sauerkraut on the side. You may want to bring your own containers or bags, if you don’t want to haul the boxes home. Otherwise, you can return them at another time to the Farm or the AA Farmers’ Market throughout this winter. Most of the following items can be stored for long-term (especially the root vegetables) or preserved very simply, so please note storage or simple cooking tips listed below, in the ASPARAGUS TO ZUCCHINI cookbook (p. 191), or on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

This Thanksgiving Share is a sampling of this year’s fall harvest and a testament to this year’s hardworking hands. Thank you for being part of our CSA. We hope you enjoy this abundant Thanksgiving Distribution. Thanks for buying locally and seasonally. We wish you a safe, healthy, and enjoyable Thanksgiving!
–Deb, Richard & the 2017 Tantre Farm Crew

UPCOMING EVENT: We would like to encourage you to attend the 3rd Annual AGRARIAN ADVENTURE’S HARVEST BRUNCH fundraiser on Sun. Nov. 19 from 10 AM until 1 PM at Great Oak Cohousing Common House (500 Little Lake Dr., Ann Arbor). Just FYI for you all to know that parking is on the street. Deb has been a board member for the past 7 years, and continues to visit classrooms for the “Farmer in the Classroom” program. The Agrarian Adventure (www.agrarianadventure.org) also provides other programming for school gardens, and afterschool garden clubs. Tantre Farm always donates every year to this awesome, family-friendly fundraiser. The menu below prepared by Chef Chris Chiapelli of the UM Ross School of Business & Black Pearl looks awesome:
***Tantre Farm Heirloom Veggie Hash with or without eggs, Roasted Pumpkin and Squash Pancakes with maple syrup or whipped cream & smoked brown sugar, Mighty Good Coffee Waffles with Tahitian vanilla bean infused syrup and Mindo chocolate sauce, Slow Farms Roasted Acorn Squash Bowl with vanilla yogurt, granola and fall fruits. Vegan and gluten-free options available, and all can be paired with breakfast meats from Steinhauser and Black Oak Farms. Many other farms and food artisans have contributed as well! Please come to the brunch and find out who. Hope to see you there this coming Sunday!

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE?

BEETS: This beet variety will be in a mixed net bag of topless roots; this is Red Ace baby beets (round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor when eaten raw or cooked).
-How to use: roots good in juices, soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store: store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS: You will receive 1-2 stalks of tiny, green cabbage-like sprouts with mildly pungent, mustard-like flavor. These sprouts are very easy to break off and seem to store better while still on the stalk until ready for use.
-How to use: Boil or steam for 5-10 minutes without overcooking, so they are still bright green; toss with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper, or a pat of butter; excellent roasted or stir-fried.
-How to store: Refrigerate for up to a week or more unwashed in a plastic bag in hydrator drawer.
-How to freeze: Blanch sprouts for 3-4 minutes, rinse in cold water, drain, and store in air-tight bags or container.

CABBAGE (Kaitlin): large, late-season cabbage that is excellent for kraut with a very white, rather than green, interior after storage; should store well until December or January.
-How to use: steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store: You will receive this unpeeled and unwashed, so that it will store better, so the leaves may look a little dirty or brown. It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

CARROTS (Orange and Purple): You will receive a mixed rainbow bag of these topless, frost-sweetened carrots with an orange variety called Chantenay (shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Purple Haze (bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade).
-How to use: Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; stores best in near freezing conditions around 32 degrees and 95% humidity; greens may last up to a week refrigerated in plastic bag .

CAULIFLOWER: You will receive Romanesco (lime green, spiraled heads with pointed, spiraled pinnacles; crisp and mild).
-How to use: Raw for salads and dips, steamed, sautéed, or roasted.
-How to store: Sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.
-How to freeze: Blanch 2-4 minutes, rinse under cold water, drain and dry, pack into freezer bags.

GARLIC: You will receive 4 bulbs of German White (a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system).
-How to use: Excellent in all cooking; make garlic butter with 1/2 cup of softened butter mashed with four minced cloves of garlic
-How to store: store for several months in a cool, dark, dry, well-ventilated place; if cloves begin to get soft or moldy, break off bad part, chop, and pack into small jar filled with olive oil, then refrigerate (great gift idea!).

FRESH HERBS: Everyone will receive 2 Herbs: Parsley (dark green leaves—curly or flat-leaf are interchangeable–strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces) and Rosemary (pine needle-like leaves used with potatoes, bread doughs, risottos, mixed vegetables, and meat dishes, as well as in sweet dishes such as lemonade, creams, custards, and syrups).
-How to store: Place in plastic bag and store in refrigerator up to a week or put herb bunch in jar with 2 inches of water, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

KALE: You will receive the top crown of Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”).
-How to use: Boil for 2-3 minutes or steam for 3-5 minutes, until color brightens (Colors will darken or fade if overcooked, and then can be mushy, tasteless, and less nutritious), and then toss with red wine vinegar/olive oil/salt/pepper, or sesame oil/rice vinegar/soy sauce, or lemon vinaigrette, or just butter and salt; mix greens (most are interchangeable in recipes) into omelets, quiches, lasagna, casseroles, soups, stews, and gravies.
-How to store: Refrigerate unwashed in plastic bag for to 2 weeks.
-How to freeze: Blanch washed greens for 1-2 minutes, rinse in cold water, drain, and pack into air-tight containers, or just destem, chop, and freeze in bags.

ONIONS: You will receive a few bulbs of Patterson (medium-large, blocky bulbs with dark yellow skin and thin necks; excellent storage onion) and Red Hawk (medium to large, uniform, deep red bulbs).
-How to use: good in French onion soup, great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, grilled.
-How to store: can last for 3 to 6 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

PARSNIPS: long, cylindrical, creamy-white roots with sweet flavor; contain small amounts of iron and vitamin C.
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, sauteed, steamed; our favorite way to prepare them is to roast with olive oil and fresh herbs.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

POTATOES: Everyone will receive mixed bags of the following varieties of potatoes including Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is good for baking or frying) and Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants), Dakota Red (red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying), and Russian Banana Fingerling (an heirloom potato with small, banana-shaped tubers with yellow skin and light yellow flesh; used by chefs for its delicious flavor and smooth “waxy” texture that doesn’t fall apart when cooked; good baked, boiled, or in salads).
-How to store: keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag; ideal temperature is 40-50 degrees with high humidity (80-90%). A basement or very cool closet will work. If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout; light turns them green; don’t refrigerate, since the starches turn to sugars.

PIE PUMPKIN (Baby Bear): bright orange skin with dry, sweet flesh
-How to use: Excellent for pies (For other ideas see winter squash)
-How to store: store whole pumpkins at room temperature up to a month or for 2 to 3 months in moderately cool conditions (45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity).
-How to freeze: Bake pumpkin until fork tender at 350 degrees, purée and put cooked pulp in freezer bags.

DAIKON RADISH: This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag of topless roots; this is K-N Bravo (looks like an overgrown carrot with beautiful, lavender-purple color; good, sweet, eating quality).
-How to use: excellent julienned, sliced, used in a salad or tossed with your favorite vinaigrette; good eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled
-How to store: not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks

WATERMELON RADISH: This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag of topless roots; this is as an heirloom Chinese variety; large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste; very mild.
-How to use: soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

BABY RAPINI: also called “Broccoli Raab” or Rabe; leafy green with 6- to 9-inch stalks usually with scattered clusters of tiny broccoli-like buds, but ours don’t have buds yet, so just the leaf; traditional Italian specialty combining qualities of broccoli and mustard greens.
-How to use: used for salads or light cooking; to cook simply: clean rapini with water, oil pan, add garlic and brown. Add 1 cup of water. Put in rapini, season to taste. (Lemon may be used if desired.) Cover pan and steam for thirty minutes. Pepperoni or sausage may be added to rapini after it is fully cooked.
-How to store: wrap in dampened cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

SAUERKRAUT: We are pleased to offer 2 jars of the Brinery’s products. There will be a few different varieties to choose from. The Brinery is a local foods business, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer alum, David Klingenberger. For more information, please visit www.thebrinery.com.
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially meat dishes, salads, roasted veggies, or sandwiches.
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED up to 1 year or longer depending on how you like the flavor, since it will get stronger with more age. *NOTE: This sauerkraut jar has NOT been canned, so store in refrigerator.
***
Background & Recipes: http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-11-27/entertainment/bs-md-sauerkraut-and-turkey-20131125_1_sauerkraut-reuben-sandwich-cabbage!
www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Turkey-with-Sauerkraut-Riesling-and-Pork-Sausages
www.timesunion.com/living/article/Sauerkraut-on-New-Year-s-a-Pennsylvania-tradition-561496.php
www.cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016892-sauerkraut-and-apples

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: A white salad turnip with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture. Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium; good in salads and soups) and greens (slightly sweet and can be boiled, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, and since hairless, are good in salads; excellent source of vitamins A & C and good source of riboflavin, calcium and iron) are edible!
-How to use: good in salads and soups, roasted, steamed, sautéed,
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last for 4-5 months, if stored like beets, preferring cold and moist conditions.

WINTER SQUASH: It’s been a great squash year! You will receive all of the following varieties:
*Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh)
*Buttercup Kabocha (green, blocky, with a gray “button” on the blossom end; thick, dry, deep orange flesh; medium-dry and sweet; dry storage)
*Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash)
*Carnival (multicolor Sweet Dumpling with colorful patches and flecks of dark and light green, orange, and yellow; sweet flesh and edible skin)
*Jester Acorn (about the size of Carnival squash, but with better eating quality; an oval, ivory-colored squash with green striping between the ribs that is tapered on both ends with small to average ribs)
*Pikes Peak (an heirloom variety, oblong, teardrop-shaped, slate-blue colored fruit; has thick orange flesh that is sweet and tasty; excellent keeper; believed to be of Native American origin, possibly from Mexico)
*Spaghetti (3-5-pounds, golden yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size, only mildly sweet with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet)
*Tetsukabuto (5-6 pound Japanese squash; nearly round with dark green rind, slightly mottled and ribbed; sweet and nutty flavor with yellow, thick flesh)

-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; boil or steam chunks for 15-20 minutes, or until tender (peel skins off “before” or “after“ cooked, but “after” is easiest when it’s cooled); mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal.
-How to store: Keep for several months (depending on the variety) at 45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature. Here is a great link, which offers good advice for storing winter squash: https://bonnieplants.com/library/how-to-store-winter-squash/

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipe” after it.

TANTRÉ FARM SLAW (A simple, easy salad!) Serves 4.
2 medium beets, grated
3 large carrots, grated
1 parsnip, grated
1 watermelon radish, grated
sesame or sunflower seeds, toasted
olive oil
lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Grate vegetables into a bowl. Chop onion, if desired, and add to bowl. Toast sesame or sunflower seeds. Add when cooled. Add olive oil and lemon juice as a salad dressing to suit your taste. Be careful of too much liquid. The tartness of the lemon should be prominent. Serve immediately or marinate for a few hours in the refrigerator. Variations: Add grated turnips, daikon, cabbage, etc.

TANTRE FARM OVEN-ROASTED HARVEST VEGETABLES
**Keep in mind, any combination of the following root vegetables will work. Roasted veggies are standard at many Tantre Farm meals. Yummy!
1 c. Brussels sprouts, cut in halves
1 c. carrots, quartered or chunks
1/2 lb. unpeeled multi-colored potatoes, cut into chunks if large
1 watermelon or daikon radish, julienned
2 onions, sliced
2 parsnips, cut into chunks
1 c. turnips, cut into chunks
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 c. winter squash, cut into chunks
3-4 Tbs. vegetable or olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
2 tsp. chopped fresh parsley
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Combine any combination of vegetables above in large bowl, except parsley. Drizzle oil over. Sprinkle with garlic, herbs, salt and pepper; toss gently to coat. Bake for 30 minutes in 1 or 2 roasting pans or until vegetables are beginning to slightly brown. Turn the vegetables 2 or 3 times during cooking to prevent burning. Then increase heat to 425° and add chopped parsley (or may be added as a fresh garnish at the very end), toss vegetables, and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring once, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned. Makes 6-8 servings.

WHOLE ROASTED ROMANESCO WITH LEMON, GARLIC, AND THYME (https://www.landeeseelandeedo.com/recipe/whole-roasted-romanesco-with-lemon-garlic-and-thyme) 5-6 servings
1head Romanesco cauliflower
1 1/2-Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 medium lemon
zest from 1/2 lemon
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2-tsp. fresh thyme or rosemary, minced
1 medium onion, sliced
3 sprigs fresh thyme or rosemary
generous sprinkle salt and pepper
1/8-tsp crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
1/8-cup Parmesan cheese (optional)
Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F. Trim the romanesco’s stem and leaves, then lay flat on a rimmed baking sheet. Tuck shallot slices and springs of thyme underneath the romanesco. Drizzle or brush olive oil over the head of romanesco, then rub the crushed garlic and lemon zest over it with your fingers. Squeeze juice from half of a lemon over top, then season generously with salt and pepper. If a little heat is desired, add 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon of crushed red pepper flakes. Cook in the center of the oven for 40-50 minutes, until golden brown and softened (you can cook longer if you want the romanesco more tender). Remove from oven and squeeze juice from remaining lemon half over the romanesco. If desired, sprinkle freshly grated Parmesan cheese on top. To serve, slice romanesco like a cake into generous wedges. Garnish with additional cheese, if desired. Option to pair with aioli, marinara sauce, or your favorite dipping sauce.

ITALIAN PEASANT SOUP (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC) Makes 8 1/2 cups
1/4 cup white wine
1 cup finely chopped onions
1 cup finely diced celery or celeraic
1 cup finely diced carrots
1 1/2 cup peeled and diced potatoes
1 1/2 cup peeled and diced parsnips
8 cups vegetable stock or water
1/2 tsp thyme
2 tsp crushed garlic
1 Tbsp soy sauce
2 cups chopped kale
Combine wine, onions, celery, and carrots in large pot over medium heat, and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender, about 25 minutes. Stir in potatoes, parsnips, stock, thyme, garlic, and soy sauce. Bring to simmer, cover and cook over low heat until potatoes are not quite tender, about 15 minutes. Add greens and cook 10-15 minutes longer.

MARTHA STEWART’S PUMPKIN SOUP IN A PUMPKIN (from www.recipezaar.com) Serves 6.
6 cups chicken stock
2-3 cups pared pumpkin, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1 cup thinly sliced onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon fresh sage or rosemary leaves
5 peppercorns
1 medium pie pumpkin
1/2 cup heavy cream, warmed
1 teaspoon chopped fresh, parsley
In a covered saucepan, heat the stock, cubed pumpkin, onion, garlic, salt, thyme, and peppercorns to boiling; reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, 20 minutes. Remove 1/2 cup of the pumpkin with a slotted spoon; reserve. Simmer remaining pumpkin mixture, uncovered, 20 minutes longer; transfer to a large bowl. Preheat oven to 350F degrees. Cut the top off the sugar pumpkin and remove the seeds. Place the pumpkin on a baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes; set aside in a warm spot. Puree 2 cups of the pumpkin mixture in a blender or food processor; return pureed mixture to the pot. Repeat with remaining pumpkin mixture. Heat pureed mixture to boiling; reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Stir warm cream and reserved pumpkin into soup. Place the warmed sugar pumpkin on a platter; ladle the soup in and garnish with parsley. Serve hot.

DAIKON IN PLUM SAUCE (from Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables by John Peterson) Serves 3 to 4.
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons plum sauce
1 tablespoon minced scallion
3 tablespoons peanut oil
1 daikon radish, peeled, cut into matchstick-sized strips (could add watermelon radish as well)
2 tablespoons water
Combine the soy sauce, vinegar, and cornstarch in a small bowl; stir until cornstarch dissolves. Stir in the plum sauce and scallions. Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Swirl the oil around the wok so that it covers the cooking area, then add the daikon; cook, stirring constantly, for 30 seconds. Add the water; cover. Cook until the daikon is tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the soy sauce mixture and continue cooking, stirring vigorously, until the sauce has thickened, 2 to 3 minutes.

GRATED BEET AND CARROT SALAD
3-4 beets, grated
3-4 carrots and/or turnips, grated
1 finely chopped onion (or bunch of scallions or leeks)
1/3 cup cider vinegar
2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 tsp honey
Pour over vinegar and honey, mix and let marinate.

TETSUKABUTO SQUASH PIE (from Backwoods Home Cooking)
1 9-inch unbaked pie shell
2 cups mashed or pureed, cooked pulp of Tetsukabuto squash
1/2 tsp. vanilla
10 oz. evaporated milk
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 Tbsp. unbleached flour
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. ginger
1/3 cup chopped pecans
Thoroughly mix pulp, vanilla, and milk. Mix sugar, flour, nutmeg, and ginger together and stir into the wet mixture. Pour into the pie shell and bake in 375° oven until the middle of pie is almost firm but still sticky. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with pecans. Continue baking until a straw inserted in the center comes out clean. Entire baking time takes 40-45 minutes.

MIDNIGHT SUNSET: A GINGER AND BEET JUICE COOLER (from Learning to Eat Locally) Makes 1/2 gallon.
1 qt cooking water from 5-6 beets cooked in 2 qts water
1 qt water
1 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 cup lemon juice
1 1/2 Tbsp coarsely chopped ginger
Ice
Ginger ale (optional)
In a gallon jug or plastic juice container, combine beet juice, water (reserving 1 cup), sugar, lemon juice, stirring until sugar is dissolved. In a small saucepan, bring the reserved cup of water and ginger to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, and simmer until water is reduced to about half of its original volume. Strain ginger liquid into beet juice, discarding ginger pieces. Cover and chill in refrigerator for at least an hour. Shake before serving, and pour over ice. If you are using ginger ale, pour equal parts ale and Midnight Sunset in each glass, or combine them to taste.

Ext. Week 3: October 29 – November 4, 2017

TANTRE FARM CSA NEWSLETTER
Extended Fall CSA Share
Week 3
Oct. 29-Nov. 4, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BRUSSELS SPROUTS: tiny, green cabbage heads with mildly pungent, mustard-like flavor.
-How to use: boil or steam for 5-10 minutes without overcooking, so they are still bright green; toss with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper, or a pat of butter; excellent roasted or stir-fried.
-How to store: refrigerate for up to a week or more unwashed in a plastic bag in hydrator drawer.

BROCCOLI: emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems.
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week

CARROTS (Purple Haze): bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade.
-How to use: can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry, unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

CAULIFLOWER (Amazing): medium-sized, white heads with domed, solid curds.
-How to use: Raw for salads and dips, steamed, sautéed, or roasted.
-How to store: Sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.

EGGPLANT: You will receive a few of these last tastes of summer, Nadia (slender, purplish-black, glossy-like, bell-shaped fruit) or Orient Express (dark purple Asian type with long, slender, glossy fruits, which are delicately flavored and quick cooking).
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, fried, grilled, or can be sliced into rounds for grilling or broiling; cut into cubes for stews and stir-fries.
-How to store: best fresh, but can be stored at room temperature or in refrigerator drawer for up to 1 week.

KALE: You will receive Rainbow Lacinato Kale (unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins).
-How to use: for salads, soups, braised, and light cooking
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator

ONIONS: You will receive Patterson (medium-large, blocky bulbs with dark yellow skin and thin necks; excellent storage onion).
-How to use: great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, onion rings, and other dishes for flavor
-How to store: will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

GREEN SWEET PEPPERS: typical green bell pepper with large blocky cells with fruity, sweet flavor
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in fridge drawer for 1-2 weeks.

SWEET PEPPERS (Red Knight): a mix of big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red peppers with sweet flesh
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in fridge drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES (Russian Banana Fingerling): an heirloom potato with small, banana-shaped tubers with yellow skin and light yellow flesh; used by chefs for its delicious flavor and smooth “waxy” texture that doesn’t fall apart when cooked; good baked, boiled, or in salads.
-How to store: Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag.

PURPLE DAIKON RADISH: You will receive K-N Bravo (looks like an overgrown carrot with inside flesh pale purple with purple streaks; good, sweet, eating quality).
-How to use: excellent julienned, sliced, used in a salad or tossed with your favorite vinaigrette; good eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled
-How to store: wrap in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks

RADISHES (Easter Egg): a beautiful mix of red, purple, pink, and white round radishes; crisp and mild flavor.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, stir-fried
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

BABY RAPINI (Broccoli Raab): leafy green with 6- to 9-inch stalks and without clusters of tiny broccoli-like buds (most of ours grew to maturity without the buds, so just the leaf); traditional Italian specialty combining qualities of broccoli and mustard greens.
-How to use: used for salads or light cooking; to cook simply: clean rapini with water, oil pan, add garlic and brown. Add 1 cup of water. Put in rapini, season to taste. (Lemon may be used if desired.) Cover pan and steam for thirty minutes. Pepperoni or sausage may be added to rapini after it is fully cooked.
-How to store: put in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash) and Blue Hubbard (blue-green, big fruits are tapered at the ends and have a bumpy, hard shell; averages in the 12-15 lb. range with some larger; medium-dry, medium-sweet, yellow flesh).
-How to use: bake, roast, mash or puree cooked squash; use in creamy soups, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store: Keeps for several months (depending on the variety) at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. FINAL WEEK OF EXTENDED FALL CSA: Please return share boxes & bring extra bags! Please return any forgotten boxes from past weeks. You may bring bags, a cooler or other containers to transfer your produce from the boxes at your distribution site, especially this week, which is your final week of Ex. Fall Shares. We also can use any extra “GROCERY” paper or plastic bags.

2. THANKSGIVING CSA Registration is OPEN! This share is a one-time pick-up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. It is available for pick up on Nov. 18 (the Saturday before Thanksgiving) at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon, Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M., and Pure Pastures in Plymouth from 9 AM – 7 PM. More details can be found on our website.

3. THANKSGIVING TURKEYS: Thanksgiving turkeys are available to order from Two Tracks Acres, a 10 acre farm in Grass Lake, Michigan. These are free-range, broad-breasted bronze turkeys that range 13-25 pounds. Turkeys are $4.50/lb, and are fresh (not frozen) with on farm pickup the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. Contact Stephanie Willette at twotracksacres@gmail.com or visit the website www.twotracksacres.com.

4. INTERESTED IN JOINING OUR CSA IN 2018? Summer CSA Shares will be available for $650 for 20 weeks from June through the middle of October. We will be offering “online registration” for Summer Shares very soon, so you will all receive a separate email informing you when registration opens, so please consider signing up for another year. We will be accepting deposits or alternative payment proposals. We welcome new members, so tell your friends and family!!

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
by Richard and Deb

The bright yellow leaves have all, but a few, blown away on the persimmon trees. Now the tree branches dangle in the wind with wrinkly, burnt orange persimmons like so many apricot-colored, sugar plums. The bees do not come to the edge of their door on the bottom of their bee hive on these cool, fall days. They are all inside clustered around their queen. The cool, almost frozen, nights crystalize the dew and water vapor painting the Brussels sprouts, kale, cauliflower, and broccoli leaves with thick, silvery frost, sweetening each leaf with a frozen kiss!

The last of the carrots are being pulled from the cool, wet earth, and brought up to the root cellar along with the turnips, radishes, beets, and storage cabbage. Every morning for the past few weeks we spend hours breaking garlic bulbs into individual cloves inside the dimly lit barn before the first light of day. Almost 1300 pounds of garlic are ready to plant in the next couple of weeks. The tomato vines have been cut down with the twine wrapped up and the stakes pulled out for almost one mile of dead, rattling, spent tomato vines. The winter squash and pumpkins have been boxed up into thousands of 50-lb. crates. Onions have been sorted and resorted and stacked in baskets as high as the hands can reach next to the crates of squash in the big red barn.

It seems this mild, fall weather will provide us with an abundant supply of root vegetables for the next 4 to 5 months, which we hope will satisfy our supportive community of members, who may be interested in continuing to receive produce through our November Thanksgiving CSA, our December Solstice CSA, and possibly other opportunities for stocking up on local Tantre vegetables throughout the winter. We also would like to encourage you to help us plan for next Summer of 2018 by signing up early for our Summer CSA with a deposit or full payment to help us purchase seeds, repair equipment, and make plans for the Summer bounty.

We are grateful to the whole Tantre community of members, volunteers, farm workers, the earth, the sun, and the rain for this bountiful harvest. Please feel free to contact us at the farm or come visit us at the Winter Chelsea Farmers Market & Ann Arbor Farmers Market throughout the fall and winter. Thank you for being a member of the Tantre Farm Extended Fall CSA!!

RECIPES

SOUTHWEST COLACHE (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
2 Tbsp oil (veggie or olive)
1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, diced
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
16 oz chopped tomatoes, fresh or canned, undrained
1 bell pepper, seeded, chopped
14 oz whole kernel corn
1 green chili, chopped (optional)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Grated cheese, for topping (optional)
Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add squash, onion, and garlic; cook for 5 minutes or until onion is tender. Add tomatoes and bell pepper to skillet. Bring to simmer, cover and let simmer for 15 minutes over low heat. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer covered, 5 minutes, or until squash is tender. Uncover; increase heat to high and continue cooking a few minutes or until most liquid has evaporated. Top with grated cheese, if desired.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS, BROCCOLI & CAULIFLOWER CASSEROLE (www.mamachallenge.com) Serves 12
2 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream (or heavy cream alternative)
1/3 cup chopped onions
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup bread crumbs
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, quartered
1 medium head of broccoli, cut into small (1-inch) florets
1 1 medium head of cauliflower, cut into small (1-inch) florets
1 1/2 cups grated parmesan cheese (divided use)
1 cup white cheddar, cut into small (1-inch) cubes
Salt, pepper and white pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 375 F. Combine cream, shallots and sage in large saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside to cool slightly. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Brown bread crumbs (about 2 minutes) then transfer to a bowl to cool. Stir in parsley. Arrange equal mix of of vegetables in the buttered baking dish (13×9 or larger). Then add 1 cup of cubed white cheddar. Arrange remaining vegetables over the first layer. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Pour cream mixture evenly over the vegetables. Cover the pan with foil and bake for 50 to 60 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Remove foil from casserole; sprinkle evenly with toasted bread crumbs. Bake uncovered 15 minutes or until bread crumbs are browned.

Ext. Week 2: October 22-28, 2017

TANTRE FARM CSA NEWSLETTER
Extended Fall CSA Share
Week 2
Oct. 22-28, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA: an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

BROCCOLI: emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems.
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week

CARROTS (Chantenay): shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods.
-How to use: can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry, unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

CAULIFLOWER: You will receive 2 kinds, Amazing (medium-sized, white heads with domed, solid curds) and Romanesco (lime green, spiraled heads with pointed, spiraled pinnacles; crisp and mild).
-How to use: raw for salads and dips, steamed, sauteed, or roasted.
-How to store: sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.
-How to freeze: blanch 2-4 minutes, rinse under cold water, drain and dry, pack into freezer bags.

CELERY: tall, crisp, glossy green stalks and leaves with a strong, celery flavor; contains vitamins A, C, B-complex, and E with some other minerals; also high in fiber and sodium.
-How to use: typically eaten raw and used in salads; ribs and leaves can be added to casseroles, soups, stews, and stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; can be frozen in slices on a cookie sheet and then packed into freezer bags; celery leaves can be dehydrated and added to soups or stews.

EGGPLANT: You will receive a few of these last tastes of summer, Nadia (slender, purplish-black, glossy-like, bell-shaped fruit) or Orient Express (dark purple Asian type with long, slender, glossy fruits, which are delicately flavored and quick cooking).
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, fried, grilled, or can be sliced into rounds for grilling or broiling; cut into cubes for stews and stir-fries.
-How to store: best fresh, but can be stored at room temperature or in refrigerator drawer for up to 1 week.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm): A bouquet per household of up to 15 stems will be part of your share, if the frosts don’t get to them first. Extra bouquets cost $4.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, & boosts the immune system.
-How to use: minced raw in salad dressings, sautéed and added to stir-fries, meats, vegetables
-How to store: fresh garlic can be stored in an open, breathable container in a cool, dark place for many months.

KALE: You will receive Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”).
-How to use: for salads, soups, braised, and light cooking
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator

ONIONS: You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color).
-How to use: great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, onion rings, and other dishes for flavor
-How to store: will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

HOT PEPPERS (Joe’s Long Cayenne): long, slender, bright red fruits tapering to a point with medium heat; are excellent for homemade hot sauce; dry well for ristras and delicious, dried hot pepper flakes
How to use: handle hot peppers with gloves, and cut on glass plate; often roasted, chopped, and used to season corn bread and cheese dishes; good for stuffed appetizers, jams, salsa, and pickles.
How to store: for fresh peppers, store in refrigerator; for drying peppers, place string through the stems and hang in cool, dry, well-ventilated spot.

SWEET RED PEPPERS (Carmen): 6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES (Dakota Red): red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying.
-How to store: Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag

RADISHES (Easter Egg): a beautiful mix of red, purple, pink, and white round radishes; crisp and mild flavor.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins A, B, C.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.

TOMATOES (San Marzano): early, large classic Italian Roma tomato; balanced acidic flavor with meaty flesh, so good for sauce and paste
-How to use: sauté, bake, broil, or grill; eat raw in salads or add to soups, stews, or sauces
-How to store: keep at room temperature for up to 1 week

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh; great stuffed with rice, breading, or soups), Buttercup Kabocha (green, blocky, with a gray “button” on the blossom end; thick, dry, deep orange flesh; medium-dry and sweet; very dry at harvest, sweeter after a few weeks), and Carnival (multicolor Sweet Dumpling with colorful patches and flecks of dark/light green, orange, and yellow; sweet flesh and edible skin).
-How to use: bake, roast, mash or puree cooked squash; use in creamy soups, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store: Keeps for several months (depending on the variety) at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. PLEASE RETURN SHARE BOXES & BRING EXTRA BAGS! Please return any forgotten boxes from past weeks. You may bring bags, a cooler or other containers to transfer your produce from the boxes at your distribution site, especially next week, which is your final week of Ex. Fall Shares. We also can use any EXTRA PAPER OR PLASTIC BAGS (Grocery Bags ONLY).

2. THANKSGIVING CSA Registration is OPEN! This share is a one-time pick-up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. It is available for pick up on Nov. 18 (the Saturday before Thanksgiving) at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon, Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M., and Pure Pastures in Plymouth from 9 AM – 7 PM. More details can be found on our website.

3. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
by Richard and Deb

One hundred years ago the small farm down the road started keeping dairy cows behind their little cow shed. Over the many decades new buildings were added and the herd grew behind the cow shed. At one point there were over 60 cows eating grass/hay, making manure, and adding to the soil fertility in the acres of pasture behind the shed. After 80 years of pasturing cows, this fertility was very concentrated, and the cow herd was finally sold. The pasture grew up into lush burdock, nettles, lambs quarters, pigweed, cockleburs, jimson weed, and wild perennial grasses over the next ten years.

Then two years ago we started farming our neighbor’s pasture down the road. The field was plowed, while the deep tap roots of those weeds were broken apart and upturned. Week after week it was raked and raked until the seed load sprouted out. The first year we started growing cabbage and Brussels sprouts. This year when the soil dried out in July we planted 6000 broccoli, 5000 Romanesco cauliflowers, 3000 Brussels sprouts, and 12,000 cabbages. The little seedlings were heeled in with a 2-row transplanter with a little drink of compost tea, and that’s all the water they had for many weeks. We were able to conserve the water by lightly cultivating around the little seedlings with a goosefoot drag, which formed a dust mulch. For much of the season the soil was dry and the plants were not very large. We were thinking, “Maybe we won’t get very much broccoli and cauliflower this year. Maybe the cabbages will be small.” However, that was definitely not the case. By August we had one good rain, almost half an inch, and this was enough to keep the plants going. The brown, dusty soil gave way to large, turgid, green leaves that grew to be waist high.

As a result you may have noticed from last week’s CSA share, we have been harvesting 10 to 12 pound cabbages and 5 to 8 pound cauliflowers. The vegetables have been so big that sometimes only four heads of cauliflower will fit into a 2-bushel box. The obvious conclusion seems to be that all those years of cows grazing the land created a huge level of productivity. These last few weeks we have been trying to deal with what feels like a tidal wave of food pushing us into a slight state of mania. We are definitely seeing the bounties this fall. We have sold these vegetables at market. We have given them to you, our CSA members. We have fed the pigs. We have fed the cows. And yet, there is more and more and more; as if somehow the sorcerer’s apprentice has miscast the master’s spell upon the land, and now there is only the nonstop mania of Romanesco cauliflower with its fractal pattern spinning the infinite Fibonacci sequence into our bodies and minds. A great roaring monster that we are staggering to tame.

These prolific, cruciferous vegetables boost your immune system and are brimming with nutrition–calcium, iron, folic acid, potassium, Vitamins A and C. We hope that these giant vegetables are not too overwhelming for you, so please consider eating them all winter long by freezing them or making them into soups. You even might want to share them with your coworkers, family, or friends. You can send them to school in your kid’s lunches. You might even consider making one of these unique brassicas a centerpiece for your harvest table. We hope that you can celebrate this abundance with us and enjoy the super-size produce in these super-size shares.

RECIPES

GYPSY SOUP (from Moosewood Cookbook by Molly Katzen)
2 medium onions, chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 stalk celery, chopped
2 cups chopped, peeled winter squash
1 Tbs. olive oil
3 cups stock or water
2 tsp. Spanish paprika
1 tsp. turmeric
1 tsp. basil
1 tsp. salt
1 bay leaf
dash of cinnamon
dash of cayenne
15-oz can garbanzo beans
1 cup tomatoes, chopped
1 pepper, chopped
1 Tbs. tamari
In a soup kettle, sauté onions, garlic, celery and winter squash in olive oil for about 5 minutes. Add seasonings (except tamari) and the stock or water. Simmer, covered, about 15 minutes. Add remaining vegetables and beans. Simmer another 10 minutes or so – until the vegetables are tender. Add tamari and serve.
*Tip: This soup freezes well. You can also throw in greens at the end, such as SWISS CHARD, KALE or even CARROT GREENS.

Ext. Week 1: October 15-21, 2017

TANTRE FARM CSA NEWSLETTER
Extended Fall CSA Share
Week 1
Oct. 15-21, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA: an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

BROCCOLI: emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems. You will receive broccoli shoots in your box and 1 head of broccoli outside of the box.
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well.
-How to use: can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

CAULIFLOWER (Amazing): You will receive 2 kinds, Amazing (medium-sized, white heads with domed, solid curds) and Graffitti (brilliant purple heads; attractive served raw with dip or as a cooked vegetable).
-How to use: raw for salads and dips, steamed, sauteed, or roasted.
-How to store: sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.
-How to freeze: blanch 2-4 minutes, rinse under cold water, drain and dry, pack into freezer bags.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm): A bouquet per household of up to 15 stems will be part of your share, if you are able to come and pick it any day. Extra bouquets cost $4.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and the immune system.
-How to use: minced raw in salad dressings, sautéed and added to stir-fries, meats, vegetables
-How to store: fresh garlic can be stored in an open, breathable container in a cool, dark place for many months.

KALE: You will receive Rainbow Lacinato Kale (unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins).
-How to use: for salads, soups, and light cooking
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator

ONIONS: You will receive Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color).
-How to store: will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

SWEET PEPPERS: You will receive Green Bell Peppers (large blocky cells with fruity, sweet flavor) and Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is good for baking or frying) and Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!).
-How to store: Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag

RADISHES (Easter Egg): a beautiful mix of red, purple, pink, and white round radishes; crisp and mild flavor.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins A, B, C.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

BABY RAPINI: also called “Broccoli Raab” or Rabe or Rape; leafy green with 6- to 9-inch stalks and scattered clusters of tiny broccoli-like buds (most of ours don’t have buds yet, so just the leaf); traditional Italian specialty combining qualities of broccoli and mustard greens.
-How to use: used for salads or light cooking; to cook simply: clean rappini with water, oil pan, add garlic and brown. Add 1 cup of water. Put in rappini, season to taste. (Lemon may be used if desired.) Cover pan and steam for thirty minutes. Pepperoni or sausage may be added to rappini after it is fully cooked.
-How to store: wrap in dampened cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

TOMATOES: You will receive San Marzano (early, large classic Italian Roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste).
-How to use: sauté, bake, broil, or grill; eat raw in salads or add to soups, stews, or sauces
-How to store: keep at room temperature for up to 1 week

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: A white salad turnip with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture.
-How to use: white roots good in salads and soups, roasted, steamed, sautéed. Greens can be boiled, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last up to 1-2 weeks in refrigerator.

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash) and Delicata (small, oblong, creamy colored with long green stripes, only slightly ribbed; pale yellow, sweet flesh; edible skin; best eaten within 4 months of harvest).
-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; boil or steam chunks for 15-20 minutes, or until tender (peel skins off “before” or “after“ cooked, but “after” is easiest when it’s cooled); mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store: Keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. VACATION HOLD or PICK UP RESCHEDULE: If you know that you are not able to pick up or need to reschedule pick up days during these coming 3 weeks for any reason, you can make those changes yourself by going into this link http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com and choosing “Schedule vacations or pick up location changes” under the “Member Actions” box on the left. You will need to do this a week ahead of time, if you know that you will not be picking up your share or you want to change your pick up date or location, or email us to make changes. Please make a strong effort to PICK UP ALL OF YOUR SHARES in the next few weeks. If you miss a share pick up, it is available at the farm ONLY for that day and 1 day after, but please let us know ASAP, so we know what to do with your share.

2. PRORATED SHARES: Those of you with prorated shares should know that you will all receive the online newsletter every week and also Pick Up Reminders the night before you are scheduled even though it might not be your week to pick up. This is all just computer automated, and it can’t be undone for individuals. Just FYI!

3. THANKSGIVING CSA Registration is OPEN! A more detailed email notice about this will come out to you soon. You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”, and sign up on our website. This share is a one-time pick-up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. This share will be available for pick up on Nov. 18 (the Saturday before Thanksgiving) at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon, Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M., and Pure Pastures in Plymouth from 9 AM – 7 PM.

4. PLASTIC AND PAPER GROCERY BAGS NEEDED: We encourage you to bring cloth bags, coolers, or totes to take extra produce home that is on the side besides getting the share box, so we ask for donated “grocery” (other sizes are less convenient) bags at Distribution Sites. If anyone has piles and piles of bags, please donate them to any site you pick up.

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.

RECIPES

STEAMED BROCCOLI AND SQUASH WITH TAHINI SAUCE (from http://www.wholeliving.com/151380/steamed-broccoli-and-squash-tahini-dressing)
1/2 head broccoli florets
1 Delicata squash, sliced and seeded
1 cup mixed tender greens (arugula and/or rapini)
1 cup thinly sliced red or green cabbage
2 Tbsp diced red onion
Coarse salt and pepper
1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1/4 cup Tahini Sauce (1/2 cup tahini, grated zest and juice of 1 lemon, 1 Tbsp olive oil, 1 chopped garlic clove, 1/2 tsp cumin, 1/2 tsp paprika, coarse salt)
Steam broccoli florets until bright green and tender, about 4 minutes. Remove and set aside. Steam squash until bright yellow and tender, about 10 minutes. In a bowl, toss greens, cabbage, and red onion. Top with steamed vegetables and season with salt and pepper. Drizzle with tahini sauce and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

BLUE POTATOES MASHED WITH ROASTED GARLIC (from www.foodnetwork.com)
3 lbs (about 6 cups) blue potatoes
2 1/2 oz (about 2-4 cloves, depending on size) roasted garlic
1/4 cup sour cream
1 Tbsp butter
2 Tbsp Parmesan, grated
Salt and pepper to taste
Peel and cut the potatoes into cubes. Boil them in salted water for approximately 15 minutes or fork tender. Once potatoes have cooked, drain the water. In a large bowl add the garlic, sour cream, butter, and Parmesan to the potatoes, and mash until desired consistency. Add salt and pepper to taste.

GINGER PEANUT SOUP (from How it all Vegan) Serves 4-6
1 1/2 cups broccoli, chopped
1 1/2 cups cauliflower, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1 Tbsp fresh ginger, grated
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
2 Tbsp olive oil
3 cups vegetable stock or water
1 (28 oz) can diced tomatoes (or 1 quart Roma tomatoes)
5 Tbsp natural peanut butter (or nut butter)
In a large soup pot, saute the broccoli, cauliflower, onions, ginger, garlic, cayenne, salt, and pepper in oil on medium heat until vegetables are tender. Add the stock, tomatoes, and nut butter. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

COOL and CRUNCHY RADISH AND TURNIP SALAD (from Eggs on Sunday) Serves 2

6 small radishes, thinly sliced

4 small salad turnips, thinly sliced

1/4 tsp toasted sesame oil

1/2 tsp rice vinegar

Juice of half a lime

1 Tbsp chopped chives or parsley

Coarse kosher or sea salt, to taste
Combine all ingredients in a bowl, and stir gently but thoroughly to combine and coat all the slices. Taste and season with salt (start with a little pinch and gradually add it until the flavors “pop” as much as you like).

2017: Week 20, October 8-14

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #20
Oct. 8-14, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS: round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and medium-tall, red-veined green leaves; keep in mind the greens can be substituted for Swiss chard or spinach in many recipes. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CAULIFLOWER (Amazing): medium-sized, white heads with domed, solid curds.
-How to use: raw for salads and dips, steamed, sauteed, or roasted.
-How to store: sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks or wrap in slightly dampened cloth and store in refrigerator.
You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 4 options:
–Rosemary—pine needle-like leaves used with potatoes, bread doughs, risottos, mixed vegetables, and meat dishes, as well as in sweet dishes such as lemonade, creams, custards, and syrups.
–Marjoram–a small and oval-shaped leaf, which is light green with a grayish tint. When fresh it is spicy, bitter, and slightly pungent with camphor-like notes, so often added to fish sauces, salad dressings, tomato-based sauces; goes well with vegetables including cabbages, potatoes, eggplant, and beans.
–Curly Parsley—curly, dark green leaves, often used as a garnish, but can be used interchangeably with flat-leaf parsley; has a strong parsley/celery flavor; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces.
–Black-stemmed Peppermint–superior fragrance and flavor; forest green leaves with deep purple veins and stems; leaves are good as a hot or iced tea, and adds a delicious flavor when minced and added to cooked peas, carrots, potatoes, and salads.

KALE (Green Curly): well ruffled green leaves; great for kale chips, in a salad, roasted, and in soups. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor. Our red onions have started getting soft spots in the center stem, so they are not storing well; just pop out that segment and chop up the rest of the onion. Very easy to freeze: just chop onion and put in freezer bags) and Cippolini (a traditional Italian onion known for its flat, oval shape and delicately mild, sweet flavor; ranges in size from 1-3 inches; used for pickling and to season a wide variety of dishes and especially good grilled on a skewer). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET PEPPERS: You will receive Green Bell Peppers (large blocky cells with fruity, sweet flavor) and Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe). See Week 13 for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES: You will receive Dakota Red (red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying) and Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is good for baking or frying). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BABY RAPINI: also called “Broccoli Raab” or Rabe or Rape; leafy green with 6- to 9-inch stalks and scattered clusters of tiny broccoli-like buds (most of ours don’t have buds yet, so just the leaf); traditional Italian specialty combining qualities of broccoli and mustard greens.
-How to use: used for salads or light cooking; to cook simply: clean rappini with water, oil pan, add garlic and brown. Add 1 cup of water. Put in rappini, season to taste. (Lemon may be used if desired.) Cover pan and steam for thirty minutes. Pepperoni or sausage may be added to rappini after it is fully cooked.
-How to store: wrap in dampened cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor and can be substituted for spinach in many recipes. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste) and San Marzano (early, large classic Italian Roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH & PIE PUMPKINS: Everyone will receive Sweet Dumpling (small 4-inch diameter, coloring is like the “Delicata”, but round, flat-topped shape; makes a great bowl for stuffing with rice, breading, or soups), Sunshine Kabocha (red-orange, flat-round fruit with dry, sweet, bright orange flesh; excellent for baking, mashing, and pies), and Baby Bear Pie Pumpkin (deep orange, 1 1/2-2 1/2-lb. fruits are about half the size of a normal pie pumpkin.) See Week 16 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. LAST WEEK OF THE SUMMER CSA: That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. BRING BAGS! Please bring bags (cloth for yourself and/or any “grocery-size” plastic and paper to share with others), a cooler, or a box to receive your produce this week, so you can leave the share box behind if we won’t see you again this fall.

3. STILL SPACES FOR THE “EXTENDED FALL CSA” SHARES: This 3-week share runs from Oct. 15 through Nov. 4 for $105 celebrating all the bounty of the fall vegetables! The link for online registration is http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com. Please sign up by this Saturday, Oct. 14, so you won’t miss any of those 3 weeks of produce. Please go to our website for more information. We are prorating these shares as well, so if you need to miss a week of the Extended Fall CSA, just send us an email, and we will register you for the weeks you will receive a share. Hope to share more of this abundant fall harvest with you throughout October! Tell your friends and family!! Due to outside exposure of potentially cold-damaging temperatures in October, we will not have Fall Shares at the Chelsea Farmers Market or at MOVE, since we have no way to protect these shares, so please find alternate pick up locations.

4. THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATION on November 18 is OPEN! You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”. This share is a one time pick up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. This share will be available for pick up on the Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 AM to 12 PM, at Tantré Farm from 2-5 PM, and also in Plymouth at Pure Pastures from 9 AM to 7 PM.

5. INTERESTED IN JOINING OUR CSA IN 2018? All members may renew their registration just like usual with online registration. You will all receive a separate email informing you when registration opens. Summer CSA Shares will be available for $650 for 20 weeks from June through mid October in 2018.

6. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—tomatoes have DISCOUNTED PRICES: Members–$0.75/lb. Non members–$1/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES

FRESH MINT SALSA FOR GRILLED LAMB CHOPS (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC)
3 plum tomatoes, seeded and finely diced
1/2 cup finely diced red onion
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 tsp lemon juice
3-4 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
Salt and pepper, to taste
8 lamb loin chops (or pork tenderloin)
Combine all ingredients except lamb; chill 1 hour. Prepare charcoal or heat outdoor grill. Cook lamb chops to medium rare, 4-6 minutes per side. Top each serving (2 chops) with salsa; serve immediately.

BROCCOLI RABE WITH LEMON AND GARLIC (from cooks.com) Serves 4
1 1/2 lb broccoli rabe (rapini)

2 tsp minced garlic
3 Tbsp butter

2 Tbsp minced fresh parsley

2 tsp fresh grated lemon rind
In a heavy kettle cook the broccoli rabe covered in very little water until stems are tender. Saute garlic in butter over medium heat 3 minutes. Drain the broccoli rabe, toss with garlic mixture, parsley, salt and pepper. Garnish with lemon rind.

GINGER PEANUT SOUP (from How it all Vegan) Serves 4-6
1 1/2 cups broccoli, chopped
1 1/2 cups cauliflower, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1 Tbsp fresh ginger, grated
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
2 Tbsp olive oil
3 cups vegetable stock or water
1 (28 oz) can diced tomatoes or 4 chopped fresh
5 Tbsp natural peanut butter (or nut butter)
In a large soup pot, saute the broccoli, cauliflower, onions, ginger, garlic, cayenne, salt, and pepper in oil on medium heat until vegetables are tender. Add the stock, tomatoes, and nut butter. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

***Thank you for a wonderful Summer Season filled with gratitude, community building, and a bountiful harvest. We would especially like to express our heartfelt appreciation to our farm crew for all their hard work and long hours this past season. If you get a chance to thank them please do. Please feel free to contact us throughout the rest of fall and winter for any fall storage produce at the Farm or come visit us at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market every Wed. (until December) and Sat. (year round), Chelsea Farmers Market (every Sat. through Oct.), Argus Farm Stop on Liberty or on Packard, and the People’s Food Coop throughout the winter. Thank you for being a member of the Tantre Farm Summer CSA!! Hope to share our harvest with you again for our Fall/Winter 2017 CSA’s or the Summer 2018 CSA.
–Deb, Richard, and the Tantre Farm Crew

2017: Week 19, October 1-7

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #19
Oct. 1-7, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL (optional): ALL SHARES will receive basil this week. Some of the leaves have a few brown spots due to a recent frost, but some of you may still want to make pesto with the last of the basil this season. This is an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top.

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible side shoots; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CELERY: tall, crisp, glossy green stalks and leaves with a strong, celery flavor; contains vitamins A, C, B-complex, and E with some other minerals; also high in fiber and sodium. *Organic celery tends to be a darker green, since it’s unblanched like commercial celery. The darker green color indicates more minerals and vitamins, but also is a bit stronger, so you may want to use a little less than you normally would.
-How to use: typically eaten raw and used in salads; ribs and leaves can be added to casseroles, soups, stews, and stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; can be frozen in slices on a cookie sheet and then packed into freezer bags; celery leaves can be dehydrated and added to soups or stews.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

EGGPLANT: You will receive Nadia (slender, purplish-black, glossy-like, bell-shaped fruit), Rosa Biana (an Italian heirloom; round fruit streaked with white and violet), or Orient Express (dark purple Asian type with long, slender, glossy fruits, which are tender, delicately flavored, and quick cooking). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

KALE (Rainbow Lacinato): unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Cipollini (a traditional Italian onion known for its flat, oval shape and delicately mild, sweet flavor; ranges in size from 1-3 inches; used for pickling and to season a wide variety of dishes and especially good grilled on a skewer) and Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh). See Week 13 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES: You will receive Red Dakota (red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying) and Harvest Moon (velvety dark-purple skin and dark, golden-yellow flesh ; infused with creamy nutty flavor; excellent for mashing, baking, and boiling). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste). **Once again you will also receive a few large HEIRLOOM tomato varieties, such as Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) or Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful).
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH/PIE PUMPKIN: You will receive Delicata (small, oblong, creamy colored with long green stripes, only slightly ribbed; pale yellow, sweet flesh; edible skin) and Pie Pumpkin (bright orange skin with dry, sweet flesh).
-How to use: slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; boil or steam chunks for 15-20 minutes, or until tender (peel skins off “before” or “after“ cooked, but “after” is easiest when it’s cooled); mash cooked squash with butter; puree cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store: keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75 percent humidity; will also store at room temperature.
How to freeze: if you notice a squash is getting soft or a spot starts to rot, cook it immediately, scoop out the pulp, and freeze it in freezer bags for future use.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. CORRECTION: SAUERKRAUT WORKSHOP on SUNDAY, OCT. 8 from 12 to 2 PM: Join us for our 2nd annual sauerkraut workshop and get cultured with us at the Washtenaw Food Hub in learning to make your own sauerkraut using locally-grown, organic produce from Tantre Farm! Fermentation Expert, Melissa, will be leading this Farm-to-Fermentation workshop that will cover the basics of wild vegetable fermentation. Participants will take home a jar of fermenting sauerkraut made during the workshop. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

3. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—tomatoes have DISCOUNTED PRICES: Members–$0.75/lb. Non members–$1/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

4. GROCERY BAGS NEEDED!! We could use any extra paper or plastic grocery bags you may have accumulated for market and for CSA distribution sites. Please ONLY grocery bags!

5. EXTENDED FALL CSA SHARE REGISTRATION IS OPEN: This share runs from Oct. 15 through Nov. 4 for $105 celebrating all the bounty of the fall vegetables! There is plenty of room and plenty of produce this fall, so you will get in! The link for online registration is http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com, which will bring you right to the sign up page. Please sign up by Oct. 13, so you won’t miss any of the 3 weeks of produce. We will be sending a separate email notice soon, so that everyone knows more details about this share. You also can go to our website for more information. We are prorating these shares as well, so if you need to miss a week of the Extended Fall CSA, just send us an email, and we will register you for the weeks you will receive a share. Hope to share more of this abundant fall harvest with you throughout October!

6. THANKSGIVING CSA IS OPEN! This CSA is open as well for registration for pick up on Nov. 18. A more detailed email notice about this will come out to you sometime in the next few weeks. You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”. This share is a one time pick up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. This share will be available for pick up on the Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 AM – 12 PM, Tantré Farm from 2-5 PM, or Pure Pastures from 9 AM – 7 PM.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipe” after it, and many recipe ideas will pop up. Have fun searching! Lots and lots of ideas!

AUTUMN MINESTRONE (Moosewood Restaurant Daily Special by the Moosewood Collective)
2 Tbs. vegetable oil
1 c. chopped onions
2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
2 1/2 c. peeled and cubed winter squash (such as delicata or butternut)
2 celery stalks, diced
1/2 c. peeled and diced carrots
2 1/2 c. cubed potatoes
1 tsp. dried oregano
2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper
6 c. water
4 c. chopped kale
1 1/2 c. cooked (or 15-oz. can) cannellini beans (or any cooked bean)
Warm the oil in a large soup pot on medium heat. Add the onions and garlic, and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the squash, celery, carrots, potatoes, oregano, salt, pepper, and water; cook for 10 minutes or until potatoes are almost done. Add the kale and beans (drained) and simmer for another 5 to 7 minutes, until the kale is tender and the beans are hot. Yields 12 cups. Serves 6 to 8.

CELERY SALAD WITH ROASTED PEPPERS AND MOZZARELLA (from Farmer John’s Cookbook by John Peterson) Serves 4-6
1 bunch celery
2 roasted red peppers, cut into strips
4 oz mozzarella cheese, cut into strips
2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil
6 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 small clove garlic, minced (about 1/2 tsp)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
3 eggs, hard-cooked, sliced
Combine the celery, roasted red peppers, mozzarella, and basil in a large bowl. Whisk together the oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Pour the dressing over the salad; toss to coat. Cover the bowl and chill for at least 2 hours. Toss again before serving. Arrange the egg slices decoratively around the salad.

SIMPLY PUMPKIN, ORANGE AND GINGER NECTAR Makes 2 servings, about 1 1/4 cups each
1/2 cup pureed (already baked) pie pumpkin

2 cups orange juice

1/2 to 1 tsp grated fresh ginger, or more to taste
Combine pumpkin, orange juice and ginger in small pitcher; stir until smooth. If not drinking right away, cover and refrigerate any remaining. This nectar is best when consumed within 2 days.

2017: Week 18, September 24-30

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #18
Sept. 24-30, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.
In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: We are letting our smaller patches of herbs recuperate for a week, so everyone will receive just basil this week.
*Genovese Basil—ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top.

KALE (Lacinato): dark green, noncurled, blistered leaves, but heavily savoyed. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

RADISHES: you will receive Pink Beauty (pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor). See Week 17 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf, good source of vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste). **Once again you will also receive a few large HEIRLOOM tomato varieties, such as Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) or Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful).
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive New Orchid (sweet, bright orange flesh with sherbet-like taste and skin has dark green contrast stripes; oval round, medium large “icebox” size; similar to “Sunshine” in appearance, but larger). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. SAUERKRAUT WORKSHOP on SATURDAY, OCT. 8 from 12 to 2 PM: Join us for our 2nd annual sauerkraut workshop and get cultured with us at the Washtenaw Food Hub in learning to make your own sauerkraut using locally-grown, organic produce from Tantre Farm! Fermentation Expert, Melissa, will be leading this Farm-to-Fermentation workshop that will cover the basics of wild vegetable fermentation. Participants will take home a jar of fermenting sauerkraut made during the workshop. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

3. THANKS FOR COMING TO OUR FALL WORK PARTY AND POTLUCK on Sept. 24. We managed to clean about 34 crates of garlic, weeded several herbs beds in the herb garden, and harvested some Roma tomatoes and a pile of pumpkins after our wagon ride. Throughout the day we filled our bellies full of delicious food and enjoyed the trills and jangles of Jen and Eric, our local musicians. All members were able to go home with a squash or a pumpkin, a pint of raspberries, and a flower bouquet if they wanted. We really appreciate getting to know so many of our Tantre Farm community and especially all the ways you all pitched in to help the farm!

4. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.

**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.

**U-PICK Tomatoes—tomatoes have DISCOUNTED PRICES: Members–$0.75/lb. Non members–$1/lb.

**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

5. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!! We still could use the extra hands in getting some major weeding done. Please contact us.

6. EXTENDED FALL CSA AND THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATIONS! In the next few days, Sign Up links will open, so please look up details on our website. You will receive a separate email announcing when registration is open.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES

BROCCOLI, RED PEPPER, AND CHEDDAR CHOWDER (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
1 head broccoli
6 oz sharp Cheddar, coarsely grated (1 1/2 cups)
1 large boiling potato
1 red pepper, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tsp ground cumin
2 Tbsp minced fresh thyme
1 tsp salt 1 large onion, chopped
1/4 tsp black pepper
2 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp dry mustard
3/4 cup heavy cream

Discard tough lower third of broccoli stem. Peel remaining stem and finely chop. Cut remaining broccoli into very small (1-inch) florets. Cook florets in a large pot of boiling salted water until just tender, 2-3 minutes. Transfer with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking, then drain. Reserve 3 cups cooking water for chowder. Peel potato and cut into 1/2-inch cubes. Cook potato, onion, bell pepper, broccoli stems, thyme and garlic in butter in a 3- to 4-quart heavy pot over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until onion is softened, 8-10 minutes. Add cumin, salt, pepper, and mustard and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add flour and cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Add reserved cooking water and simmer (partially covered), stirring occasionally, until potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in cream and cheese and cook, stirring, until cheese is melted, then season with salt and pepper. Puree about 2 cups of chowder in a blender until smooth (use caution when blending hot liquids) and return to pot. Add florets and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 2 minutes.

BASIL PESTO VEGAN (from What Do You Do With This Stuff?)
This is delicious!
2 cup basil leaves
2 cup tomatoes, chopped
2 garlic cloves, pressed
2 Tbsp toasted pine nuts
1 tsp salt
Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

GARLIC-BASIL CORN ON THE COB
Combine 2 tablespoons butter (softened), 1 tablespoon basil, and 1 garlic clove (minced) in a small bowl. Place 4 ears of corn into a large saucepan of boiling water; cook 4 minutes. Drain. Spoon 1 teaspoon butter mixture over each ear of corn.

KALE GRATIN AND BASMATI RICE (from Mad Mares Cookbook)
2 cups vegetable stock
1 cup diced red pepper
1 cup corn kernels
1 1/4 cups uncooked basmati rice
1 tsp dried thyme
4 lbs kale or other greens (mustard, turnip, collards)
1 1/4 cups skimmed ricotta
2/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 tsp salt
Fresh ground pepper, to taste
1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs
Olive oil spray

Combine stock, pepper, corn, rice, and thyme in saucepan. Bring to boil. Cover and simmer on low until rice is tender, about 15 minutes. Set aside. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wash greens and remove stems. Cover and cook in large pot over medium heat until greens wilt, about 5 minutes. (Water on leaves should be enough.) Drain and coarsely chop. Fluff rice. In large bowl, combine greens, rice mixture, ricotta, half of the Parmesan, salt, and pepper. Place in oiled, 2-quart gratin dish. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan and bread crumbs and spray well with oil. Bake 30 minutes until golden.

BOWTIES WITH BASIL, CILANTRO, SPINACH AND GOAT CHEESE SAUCE (from www.epicurean.com) Serves 4

1 lb bowtie pasta

1 cup lightly packed basil leaves

3/4 cup packed cilantro or mint leaves

1/2 cup steamed fresh spinach, well drained

1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

2 Tbsp butter, softened

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1 1/4 tsp sea salt

1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

6-8 ounces goat cheese

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil and cook the pasta to your liking. While the pasta is cooking, combine the basil, cilantro, spinach, Parmesan, butter, garlic, salt and pepper in a food processor and process until smooth. Add the goat cheese and pulse until well mixed with the other ingredients. When the pasta is cooked, drain, but reserve 1-2 tablespoons of the cooking water. Combine the hot pasta with the processed ingredients and the cooking water in a large bowl. Mix until the pasta is coated well. Serve and make sure you have salt and pepper on the table to season to taste.

2017: Week 17, September 17-23

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #17
Sept. 17-23, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks or wrap in slightly dampened cloth and store in refrigerator.
*Parsley: ALL SHARES will receive either “Italian Flat Leaf” or “Curly” this week. Both varieties are interchangeable in recipes. Dark green leaves with a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces. see other “Parsley” recipes in A to Z Cookbook.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

MUSHROOMS (Oyster): white, golden, or gray oyster-shaped cap with a mild, anise, earthy odor. If you don’t care for mushrooms, then leave them for someone else or gift them to a friend!
-How to use: brush off dirt to clean or wipe with damp cloth, do not wash or submerge in water; good grilled, sauteed, steamed, in soups, and in sandwiches.
-How to store: place in paper bag or wax bag and keep in refrigerator for up to 5-7 days.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried) or Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

RADISHES: you will receive Pink Beauty (pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor).
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries; excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s!
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf– best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced.
See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste), Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Nova (beautiful, bright orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent, sweet flavor), or Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor). **Once again you will also receive a few large HEIRLOOM tomato varieties, such as Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) or Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful) or Striped German (very large, meaty, 1-2 lb fruit with red-yellow stripes and dense, juicy, red-yellow streaked flesh; excellent sweet, complex flavors; a Mennonite family heirloom from the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia). Our feature article is about Heirlooms, so you can know how special they are. We pick heirloom tomatoes slightly green sometimes to prevent splitting and damage, while transporting. Heirlooms are softer and more perishable when ripe, but the flavor of each is very memorable. Best to store upside down at room temperature until completely ripe. Very easy to can, freeze, and dehydrate for tomato flavors all season long!
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Dark Belle (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor) or New Orchid (sweet, bright orange flesh with sherbet-like taste and skin has dark green contrast stripes; oval round, medium large “icebox” size; similar to “Sunshine” in appearance, but larger). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be this coming Sunday, Sept. 24, between 1-4 P.M. Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass. Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost. You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home with them, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash and a flower bouquet. Hope to see you join us!

3. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—many tomato varieties are ready for picking. Members–$1.00/lb. Non members–$1.50/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1.25/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

4. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!! We still could use the extra hands in getting some major weeding done. Please contact us.

5. EXTENDED FALL CSA AND THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATION ARE COMING SOON! In the next few weeks, Sign Up links will open, so please look up details on our website. You will receive a separate email announcing when registration is open.

6. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

WHAT’S AN HEIRLOOM?
(by Joel Heeres, “Tantré alumnus“)

It’s not a loom for your heirs, as you might think. Heirloom fruit and vegetable varieties are hundreds and sometimes thousands of years old. Heirlooms differ in shape, color, size, flavor, and storability, but they all share one characteristic– their seeds can be saved one season to plant in the next. Heirloom varieties have been bred by local farmers and gardeners over many generations and have been established as stable varieties that grow “true to seed“. These varieties are special, because they have been adapted to certain climates over a long time.

Heirloom vegetables are often more flavorful than hybrid vegetables. Hybrids are bred for high productivity, disease and pest resistance, drought resistance, and hardiness. While these traits are undeniably helpful, they often come at the cost of flavor. In addition, farmers cannot save seed from hybrid crops, as they are unstable crosses from two different varieties.

In summary, heirloom crops are beneficial to small farmers and home gardeners, because their seeds can be saved to plant again. They have better flavor and are more unique than hybrids, although they can be less hardy and prone to diseases.

At Tantré Farm, we grow both hybrid and heirloom crops. Some of the crops we grow from heirloom seeds are tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, winter squash, potatoes, onions, kale, beans, turnips, and radishes. Sometimes we will have some varieties of heirlooms only on the market tables, since we may not have a lot of them available. We’ll try to let you know when you are getting heirloom produce in your share box.

RECIPES

SWEET ONION AND WATERMELON SALSA (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure)
2 cups chopped watermelon, seeded
3/4 cup sweet onion
3/4 cup black beans, rinsed and drained
1/4 cup chopped seeded jalapeno chilies
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 Tbsp brown sugar
1/2 tsp salt

Mix watermelon, onion, beans, chilies, cilantro, brown sugar, and salt in a bowl. Refrigerate covered for 1 hour to blend flavors. Stir and serve as dip, condiment, or salad.

ITALIAN PARSLEY AND ARUGULA SALAD WITH MUSHROOMS

1 cup parsley leaves, loosely packed, washed, spun dry

1 cup arugula, loosely packed, washed, spun dry

3 firm white cultivated mushrooms; sliced thin

Dash salt

1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1/4 cup thinly-sliced red onions, soaked in ice water 15 minutes, drained

Parmesan cheese, shaved in thin curls

In a large bowl toss the parsley, arugula and mushrooms with the salt. Add the oil and toss well. Add the lemon juice and toss well. Season to taste with the black pepper. Divide the salad among plates and add to each portion some of the onions and Parmesan curls.

BROILED MUSHROOMS (from www.recipes.wikia.com) Serves 2-3
1 lb fresh oyster mushrooms, stems removed
6 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
4 garlic cloves, finely minced
4 Tbsp parsley, coarsely chopped
2 Tbsp olive oil
Salt and black pepper, to taste

Preheat the broiler. Clean the mushroom caps with a damp paper towel. Save the stems for stock or to flavor sauces. In a small bowl, combine 4 tablespoons of the lemon juice, the garlic, 3 tablespoons of the parsley, and the oil and pepper. Mix well. Line a 17×11-inch jelly roll pan with foil. Arrange the mushrooms, top side up, on the foil, and brush generously with the lemon juice mixture. Place the mushrooms 4-inches from the heat and broil until just tender, 5-7 minutes. To serve, sprinkle the mushrooms with the remaining 2 tablespoons lemon juice, 1 tablespoon of parsley, salt and pepper to taste.

2017: Week 16, September 10-16

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #16
Sept. 10-16, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL: ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks or wrap in slightly dampened cloth and store in refrigerator.
You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 4 options:
-French Sorrel–slightly tart, lemon-flavored green; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces; can be used in omelets, breads, or cooked as a side dish; leaves are shaped like spinach, but paler green in color; high in vitamin A and contains some calcium.
-Marjoram–a small and oval-shaped leaf, which is light green with a greyish tint. When fresh it is spicy, bitter, and slightly pungent with camphorlike notes, so often added to fish sauces, salads and dressings, tomato-based sauces, grilled lamb and other meats; goes well with vegetables including cabbages, potatoes, eggplant, and beans. It is usually added at the end of cooking to retain its delicate flavor or as a garnish. Traditionally, it was used in tea to cure headaches, head colds, calm nervous disorders, and to clear sinuses.
-Rosemary– With a spicy, pungent, pine flavor, rosemary is one of the most potent herbs available; good in stews, braises, and roasts of vegetables or meat.
-Curly Parsley—dark green leaves with a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces.

KALE: You will receive Red Russian Kale (the stems are purple, and leaves are deep gray-green, purple-veined, flat, non-curled, and tooth-edged.) See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf– best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced.
See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Nova (beautiful orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent sweet flavor; firm and meaty), Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste), Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Nova (beautiful, bright orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent, sweet flavor), or Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor). Very easy to can, freeze, and dehydrate for tomato flavors all season long!
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH: Everyone will receive Spaghetti Squash (3-5-pounds, pale yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size, only mildly sweet with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh).
-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet).
-How to store: Keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. “FARM TO TABLE” TROLLEY TOUR on SEPT. 17: This coming Sunday there is still room to join the Agrarian Adventure’s Trolley Tour. Each stop will feature a different chef and a different farm and include a short tour. Specialty cocktails (nonalcoholic, as well as, alcoholic options) will be available with our guest bartender Jude Walser from the Alley Bar.
*Cheese or Yogurt Appetizers at Fluffy Bottom Farms’s with Chef Chris Huey (Mediterrano)
*Roasted Pork, Vegetarian Succotash, Mashed Potatoes, Braised Greens, and a Salad at Tantre Farm with Chef Chris Chiapelli (Ross School of Business, Black Pearl)
*Apple Dessert at Albers Orchard with Chef James Raynak (Robin Hills Farm)
**The Agrarian Adventure is a local non profit that provides Farm to School experiences and supports local School Gardens, and Deb has served on the board for the past 7 years. This “progressive dinner” is a fundraiser to help continue to enrich students’ connections to the foods they eat, their personal health, and through the local community around them. For ticketing and more information visit: agrarianadventure.org.

3. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be Sunday, Sept. 24, between 1-4 P.M. Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass. Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost. You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, listen to music, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home with them, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash and a flower bouquet.

4. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—many tomato varieties are ready for picking. Members–$1.00/lb. Non members–$1.50/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1.25/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

5. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!! We still could use the extra hands in getting some major weeding done. Please contact us.

6. EXTENDED FALL CSA AND THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATION ARE COMING SOON! In the next few weeks, Sign Up links will open, so please look up details on our website. You will receive a separate email announcing when registration is open.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES
SPICY CORN KERNEL “PAN” CAKE (From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce, MACSAC) Serves 4.
2 Tbs. vegetable oil
3 heaping c. fresh corn kernels (cut from 6-8 ears)
2 Tbs. minced fresh basil, cilantro, or parsley
2 Tbs. minced onion
1-2 Tbs. minced jalapeño pepper
3 Tbs. cornmeal
3 Tbs. flour
salt & freshly ground black pepper to taste
Garnish: fresh basil, cilantro or parsley
freshly made or bottled salsa

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Measure oil into a heavy, ovenproof, medium-sized skillet (cast-iron is best) and heat pan in oven for 30 minutes. Combine remaining ingredients except the last two in a bowl, then press evenly into hot pan. (Don’t stir corn in the pan, or the crust won’t form properly.) Bake 25-30 minutes, until edges are brown and crispy. Run a spatula around the outer rim and underneath the corn cake to loosen it from the pan. Wearing hot pads, place a heat-proof serving plate face down over the pan and invert pan so the cake drops onto plate. Garnish with fresh herbs and serve with salsa. Gluten free!

SPAGHETTI SQUASH CASSEROLE (from Moosewood Cookbook) Serves 4-6
1 spaghetti squash, 8-inches long
2 Tbsp butter
1 cup chopped onion
2 medium cloves garlic, minced
1/2 lb fresh, sliced mushrooms
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp dried basil or 1 tablespoon fresh basil, minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
1 cup cottage or ricotta cheese
1 cup grated mozzarella cheese
1 cup fine bread crumbs
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Halve the squash and scoop out seeds. Bake face-down on oiled sheet until it is easily pierced by a fork, about 30 minutes. Let stand until cool enough to touch, then scoop out pulp and place in large bowl. Meanwhile, heat butter and saute onions, garlic, and mushrooms with herbs, salt and pepper. When onions are soft, add tomatoes and continue to cook until most of the liquid evaporates. Stir this mixture into squash pulp with remaining ingredients except Parmesan. Spread into buttered 2-quart casserole. Top with Parmesan. Bake uncovered for 30-40 minutes.

ROSEMARY LEMONADE (from Farmer John’s Cookbook by John Peterson) Serves 2-4
4 cups water
6 sprigs (each about 5-inches long) fresh rosemary
3/4 cup sugar (or more, to taste)
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 3 large lemons)

Bring the water to a boil in a medium pot, and then reduce the heat so that the water barely simmers. Add the rosemary sprigs; cover and steep the rosemary for 45 minutes. Remove the pot from heat and remove the rosemary sprigs. (If necessary, strain the mixture to remove loose leaves.) Add the sugar; stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool. Put the lemon juice into a large plastic or glass container and add the cooled rosemary syrup; stir until well combined. Taste the lemonade and sweeten it with additional sugar if desired. Refrigerate until cold. For an extra summery kick, garnish each serving with a sprig of fresh basil, lemon balm or mint.

2017: Week 15, September 3-9

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #15
Sept. 3-9, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL: ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NO HERBS this week: Due to a sudden shrinkage of our Tantre crew for various expected and unexpected reasons, we are too short-handed this week to harvest herbs besides Basil. If you would like a fresh herb bunch and you are at the farm and willing to pick it yourself, we could help you find it. IF ANYONE HAS TIME TO LEND A HAND WITH THE HARVEST OR WEEDING, WE SURE COULD USE THE EXTRA HELP FOR ANY AMOUNT OF TIME! Just email us, so we know what day you are coming. Our day starts around 7 AM with lunch at 12:30 PM (you would be fed!) and ends at 5 PM. Come for an hour or all day!

KALE (Green Curly): well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

KOHLRABI: delicious bulbous member of the cabbage family, that grows above ground; green skin and crisp, apple-white flesh tubers are good sources of vitamins C and A, [potassium, and calcium.
-How to use: good steamed and then mashed with potatoes, added to soups or stews, or delicious sliced and eaten raw with dip.
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to a month.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is great for baking or frying). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Nova (beautiful orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent sweet flavor; firm and meaty), Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste) Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), or Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Nova (beautiful, bright orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent, sweet flavor), Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor), or Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads). You will also receive a few large Heirloom tomato varieties. We pick heirloom tomatoes slightly green sometimes to prevent splitting and damage, while transporting. Heirlooms are softer and more perishable when ripe, but the flavor of each is very memorable. Best to store upside down at room temperature until completely ripe. Very easy to can, freeze, and dehydrate for tomato flavors all season long!
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Little Baby Flower (small, 2-4 lb. round fruit; bright green stripe pattern on shell and dark pink flesh that is sweet and crisp with a high sugar count) or Sorbet Swirl (tasty sweet flesh has beautiful pastel swirls of red and yellow; average 10 pound fruits are round to oval with 8-inches diameter). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. TOMATO PRESERVING WORKSHOP at Tantre Farm: This workshop is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 10 from 1 to 4 PM. Former Tantre intern, Noelle Dronen, will teach mostly how to can tomatoes, but also some information will be on dehydrating and freezing them. There will be active participation and “take-home” samples for those attending. Plan on bringing a Quart Size Canning Jar. Please register with your Name, Phone Number, and E-mail Address in the body of the email to us. There will be a small $5 fee for materials. Bulk tomatoes will be available for you to buy. This is a great time for canning, freezing, or dehydrating!

2. FARM TO TABLE TROLLEY TOUR on SEPT. 17 from 4 to 9 PM: The Agrarian Adventure invites you to a trolley tour of three local farms and Tantre Farm is one of them! Each stop will feature a different chef and a different farm and include a short tour. Specialty cocktails will be available with our guest bartender Jude Walser from the Alley Bar.

*Appetizers at Fluffy Bottom Farms with Chef Chris Huey (Mediterrano)

*Entree & Salad at Tantre Farm with Chef Chris Chiapelli (Ross School of Business, Black Pearl)

*Dessert at Albers Orchard (chef to be announced soon)

The Agrarian Adventure is a local non profit that provides Farm to School experiences and supports local School Gardens, and Deb has served on the board for the past 7 years. This “progressive dinner” is a fundraiser to help continue to enrich students’ connections to the foods they eat, their personal health, and through the local community around them. For ticketing and more information visit: agrarianadventure.org.

3. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be Sunday, Sept. 24, between 1-4 P.M. Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass. Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost. You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, listen to music, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home with them, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash and a flower bouquet.

4. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-pick Flowers– Some of the flowers are ready in the u-pick flower garden. You may pick 1 bouquet up to 10 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Whenever possible if you can donate $1 or $2 that will help to pay for some seed and labor costs, since we don’t charge for “feeding the soul” bouquets! Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**–U-pick Tomatoes—many tomato varieties are ready for picking. Members–$1.00/lb. Non members–$1.50/lb.

5. PLASTIC OR PAPER GROCERY BAGS NEEDED, if you would like to donate some to the farm or at markets. We are running low.

6. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

IS AT AN APPLE? IS IT A JICUMA? NO, IT’S KOHLRABI!!
When is a root vegetable not a root vegetable? When it’s a small bulbous member of the cabbage family called kohlrabi, that’s when. For all intents and purposes, kohlrabi appears to be a root vegetable in the same company as turnips, radishes, and rutabagas. However, the bulbous shape of kohlrabi is caused by a swelling of the plant’s stem near the ground. In that sense, kohlrabi is more of a tightly packed version of its cousin, the cabbage. In fact, the name “kohlrabi” is derived from two German words: “kohl” meaning cabbage and “rabi” meaning turnip. It is not unusual to hear the term “turnip cabbage” to describe kohlrabi.

Despite its connections to cabbage and turnips, steamed or boiled kohlrabi is said to taste more like broccoli or Brussels sprouts. Indeed, kohlrabi is in the same general category, the Brassica oleracea Gongylodes group, as the broccoli it resembles in flavor. It can also be used in lieu of cabbage in many of the sausage and cabbage dishes favored in German cooking.

A raw kohlrabi can also be eaten like an apple, although it contains far less sugar. Some people find the taste of raw kohlrabi to be an acquired one, but many people who were raised in largely German communities in the Midwest grew up eating kohlrabi whenever it was in season. One town in Illinois even held annual festivals in honor of the Kohlrabi, so don’t be surprised if one of our small towns in Michigan decides we are due for a celebration of Kohlrabi.

RECIPES

KOHLRABI VEGETABLE STEW (from The Rolling Prairie Cookbook by Nancy O’Connor)
2-3 medium kohlrabi, bulbs and greens
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, cut in slivers
3 medium carrots, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
2 medium potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
1 cup peeled chopped tomatoes
4 cups vegetable broth
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp salt
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp molasses

Separate leaves from kohlrabi bulbs. Peel bulbs and cut into large chunks. De-rib leaves and cut into thin strips. Set aside. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onions and saute for several minutes. Add kohlrabi bulb chunks, carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, broth, bay leaf, oregano, salt, pepper, molasses and mustard. Turn up heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until veggies are not quite tender. Add kohlrabi leaves and simmer, uncovered for another 10 minutes, or until veggies are just cooked.

KALE AND KOHLRABI SALAD (http://canolaeatwell.com/recipe/kohlrabi-and-kale-slaw)
4 cups kale, chopped
1 kohlrabi bulb, peeled and julienned
1/2 cup shredded carrots
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup toasted pecans

Dressing
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
salt and pepper
Combine kale, kohlrabi, carrots, dried cranberries and pecans in a large bowl. In a small bowl whisk together red wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, honey, minced garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper. Mix dressing with salad until well coated. Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving.