2020: Week 9, July 19-25

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #9
July 19-25, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.   You can always find past newsletters on our website at http://www.tantrefarm.com/newsletters/!

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

AMARANTH (RED LEAF): known as “Callaloo” in the Caribbean; medium-green, oval to heart-shaped leaves with splashes of burgundy-red; tastes like spinach and can be prepared like spinach. See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CABBAGE: You will receive one of the following:   Caraflex (pointed mini cabbage, extremely uniform, small heads with good wrapper leaves. Inner leaves are tender, crunchy, and have an excellent, sweet and mild cabbage flavor. Perfect for summer salads, slaws, or cooked dishes) or Baby Red Express (mini, solid, round, red heads with good appearance and flavor).  See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Mokum):  sweet, slender, “pencil carrot” with edible green leaves.  Greens are delicious in soups and also salads. See  Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh; the thin skin doesn’t need peeling, unless waxed for longer shelf life in stores.  See Week 8 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NO HERB BUNCH THIS WEEK!  Most of our herbs are taking longer to grow back, so  we are letting our smaller  patches of herbs recuperate.

LEEKS: green leaves with white to pale green stems.
Cooking tip: slit from top to bottom and wash thoroughly with root facing up to remove all of the dirt trapped between the leaf layers. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: rich in calcium and vitamins A and C; you will receive Red or Green Leaf or Romaine.  See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NEW POTATOES (Red Norland): smooth, red skin and white flesh; great baked, boiled, or roasted.  
-How to use: new potatoes are just young potatoes that haven’t had time to convert their sugar fully into starch and often have a crisp, waxy texture and thin, underdeveloped wispy skins, so are good boiled or pan-roasted, but particularly suited for potato salad, since they hold their shape well after being cut and cooked.  
-How to store: refrigerate new potatoes if not used within 2-3 days, but use up sometime during the 1st or 2nd week of receiving them; these potatoes have not been cured, so will not last as long as “cured” potatoes, which should not be refrigerated, since low temps convert the starch to sugars and may turn dark when cooked.

SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor; good source of vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron and calcium.  See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUMMER SQUASH: you will receive some variety of Yellow or Green Zucchini (gourmet zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits) or Yellow Crookneck (long, curved neck with a sometimes bumpy, yellow skin; buttery flavor and firm texture) or Patty Pan (tender, rounded scallop, bright yellow squash with a green tip; nutty flavor).
-How to use: use in salads, dips, grilled, casseroles, stuffed, or mashed with butter and seasonings.
-How to store: store in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ZOOM WALKS: During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day.  All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The next one is  July 30: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88426788010?pwd=UEZOa0FyWnBtMUpHYmkwaUlQbHlpdz09 PW: 802190. More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

2. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at most sites as well.  

3. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED, especially in the HERB Garden & FLOWER GARDEN these coming 2 weeks:  Our daughter, Ari, is having a small graduation party at the farm on Aug. 2, and there are many things to do to prepare!  If you are interested in helping out with weeding to make things look just a little tidier, please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark.   Thanks so much to all those, who have helped out so far!

4. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER: **Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time)
*Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —9 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 9 AM – 11 PM)
*Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON & FRAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
*RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

COOL AS A CUCUMBER
The cucumber, a member of the gourd family, is a distant relative to pumpkins, squash, and melons.  It is said to have originated in the Middle East.  It has been eaten as an unripe fruit, since Biblical times.  As a relative of melons, cucumbers are very high in water and so very refreshing, especially during these hot days of summer.  They are 94% water and also contain small amounts of vitamins A, C, and a few minerals.  For some, however, cucumbers are hard to digest, so seedless and “burpless” cucumbers have been bred to prevent this problem.  

Our cucumbers are not waxed (to keep them from rotting for a longer shelf life) like ordinary cucumbers found in the store, so skin and all can be eaten.  The skins are rich in vitamin E, so they are also known as an effective skin conditioner.  Also, some of the nutrients, such as vitamin A, iron, and potassium are lost when the skin is removed.  The cucumber skins, besides being good for human skin, also contain silicon and chlorophyll, making them well worth eating.  If you do wish to remove the skins, you may try making “cukesicles” for the kids.   At Tantré Farm, sometimes we peel the skins off and slice the cucumbers in half lengthwise making a long, slender, cooling treat we call “cukesicles”.

The cucumber is a non-starchy, alkaline “cooling” vegetable.  It is an excellent diuretic, helping the kidneys in waste elimination.  Cucumbers contain the enzyme, erepsin, which helps digest proteins and destroys worms.  The cucumber’s potassium content makes it useful for high and low blood pressure.  

Cucumbers deteriorate very quickly, because of their high water content, so it is important to store them in a sealed plastic bag in refrigerator crisper drawer.  Keep them away from tomatoes, apples, or citrus, which give off ethylene gas, and can speed up their deterioration.  

Most people enjoy cucumbers raw or pickled in salads or sandwiches, but sometimes a cuke can be julienned, sauteed, or baked. Try cucumber rounds topped with egg or tuna salad, or simply with salt.  Make refrigerator pickles, which are very simple and delicious.  They are featured in a number of ethnic dishes.

Although not as nutritious as most of the garden vegetables, cucumbers are very satisfying and help us replenish fluids and minerals lost in perspiration, leaving us as “cool as a cucumber”.   They are very reviving on a hot summer’s day!

RECIPES

COLD CUCUMBER LEEK SOUP
This is a creamy soup made without cream, using potatoes instead for body.  For a lighter soup, you can leave out the potatoes.  There are a number of different vegetable variations that are also good!  

2 leeks (white and light green part), cut in half, cleaned, thinly sliced (or 3/4 cup chopped onions, shallots or scallions)
1 large clove garlic, coarsely chopped
1 Tbsp oil
1-2 cups potato, chopped into 1-inch pieces
2 cups thinly sliced cucumber
2 Tbsp dill, chopped fine and divided
2 cups broth (should just cover vegetables, may need a little more)
1-2 cups cold buttermilk or plain yogurt

Saute leeks and garlic in the oil, just until wilted and not yet browned.  Add potato and cucumber.  Stir a bit.  Add 1 tablespoon chopped dill.  Just barely cover vegetables with broth and bring to a simmer.  Let simmer until potatoes are very tender, but not falling apart, about 20 minutes or so.  When the vegetables are very soft, let the mixture cool.  Once it’s cool, puree vegetables and broth together with an immersion blender, regular blender, food processor, etc., adding the remaining 1 tablespoon dill.  Check the seasoning; add salt and pepper if you like.  Chill the vegetable puree.  Before serving stir in the amount of buttermilk that you like.  I find that 2/3 vegetable puree to 1/3 buttermilk is about right at our house.  Garnish with more dill.

Variations:
*Summer squash soup: Substitute zucchini or yellow squash or any summer squash for the cucumber and potato combo.  We eat this a lot and love it on hot days.  With some bread and cheese, it makes a great meal.
*Summer borscht: For the main vegetables, use a combination of 1/3 potatoes, 1/3 beets, and 1/3 cabbage (or kohlrabi or chard stems).  Can also throw in a couple of carrots or turnips. I often use leftover beets that I’ve already roasted for this–just adding them at the end of the simmering time. 
*Vichyssoise: You can use just potatoes and leeks as the vegetables to make  French vichyssoise.  Don’t use a food processor to puree it though as it will become gluey.  You may want to use chives instead of the dill and replace the buttermilk with milk.

SAUTEED SWISS CHARD
2-3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 Tbsp olive oil
1/3 cup pine nuts
1/3 cup golden raisins
1 bunch Swiss chard (or Red Amaranth)
Salt to taste

Saute garlic with olive oil in skillet, until soft and fragrant.  Toast pine nuts in dry skillet, until lightly brown.  Cover golden raisins with boiling water until they expand or plump up (about 15 minutes); then drain.  Slice chard leaves into 2-inch-wide ribbons (just pile all of the washed leaves on top of one another and slice through the bunch every 2 inches across).  Add chard leaves to garlic and oil.  Cover and steam (stir once in a while) about 5 minutes.  Stir in raisins, pine nuts, and salt to taste.  Most kids (even most adults…) love the sweetness of the raisins with these slightly bitter greens.

2020: Week 8, July 12-18

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #8
July 12-18, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.   You can always find past newsletters on our website at http://www.tantrefarm.com/newsletters/!

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

AMARANTH (RED LEAF): known as “Callaloo” in the Caribbean; medium-green, oval to heart-shaped leaves with splashes of burgundy-red; tastes like spinach and can be prepared like spinach.
-How to use: use in soups or as a cooked green like spinach
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

CARROTS (Mokum):  sweet, slender, “pencil carrot” with edible green leaves.  Greens are delicious in soups and also salads. See  Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh; the thin skin doesn’t need peeling, unless waxed for longer shelf life in stores.  
-How to use: raw or pickled in salads or sandwiches, can also be julienned, sauteed, or baked.  
-How to store: store them in a sealed plastic bag in refrigerator crisper drawer for up to a week; use up leftovers as soon as possible.

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes.  See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH GARLIC:  a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system.  See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS:  Everyone will receive either of the following randomly placed in your box:  Genovese Basil (an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves; traditionally used in pesto, and originally from India where it was traded in ancient times via the spice routes.  This herb does not store well in a refrigerator, since it does not like cold temperatures. It will last longer when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top) or  Parsley (you may receive “Curly” or “Flat Leaf”, dark green leaves with a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces).

KALE: these have a sweet, mild, cabbage flavor and are interchangeable with broccoli, mustard greens, and other hearty greens in recipes; high in vitamins A and C and has the highest protein content of all cultivated vegetables.  You will receive Rainbow Lacinato Kale (unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins)
-How to use: for salads, soups, smoothies, and light cooking.
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

LETTUCE: rich in calcium and vitamins A and C; you will receive Red or Green Leaf or Romaine.  See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SHELLING PEAS: small, round green seeds in easy to shell pod with delicious flavor for fresh eating and freezing.
-How to use: add shelled peas to soups, stews, sautes, or stir-fries; blanch or steam for 2-4 minutes only until color is bright green.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 4-5 days; if kept too long, their sweet flavor and crisp texture diminishes.  

NEW POTATOES (Red Norland): smooth, red skin and white flesh; great baked, boiled, or roasted.  
-How to use: new potatoes are just young potatoes that haven’t had time to convert their sugar fully into starch and often have a crisp, waxy texture and thin, underdeveloped wispy skins, so are good boiled or pan-roasted, but particularly suited for potato salad, since they hold their shape well after being cut and cooked.  
-How to store: refrigerate new potatoes if not used within 2-3 days, but use up sometime during the 1st or 2nd week of receiving them; these potatoes have not been cured, so will not last as long as “cured” potatoes, which should not be refrigerated, since low temps convert the starch to sugars and may turn dark when cooked.

GREEN or GOLDEN ZUCCHINI:  You will receive Green Zucchini (uniform cylindrical, green fruits with mild flavor) or Golden Zucchini (gourmet golden zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits).
-How to use: use in salads, dips, grilled, casseroles, stuffed, or mashed with butter and seasonings.
-How to store: store in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ZOOM WALKS: During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day.  All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The next one is  July 20: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84454017487?pwd=YmhZSDAyQ1lwRnhBOFgvaU5TUmxXZz09 PW: 121689. More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

2. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at most sites as well.  

3. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED, especially in the HERB Garden & FLOWER GARDEN:  If you are interested in helping out, please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark.   Thanks so much to all those, who have helped out so far!

4. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER: **Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time)
*Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —9 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 9 AM – 11 PM)
*Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON & FRAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
*RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

SIGNS OF SUMMER
by Richard and Deb

The green hillsides seem no longer completely covered with a blanket of spring green, but rather splattered with quilted patches of mottled brown due to this extended dry weather.  The cows stand together as one large, massive, social organism swishing their tails to beat off the biting flies.  The grapevines are full of green clusters weighting down the delicate trellis waving their vine tendrils in all directions looking for something to grow upon.  The green paw paws hang small and fat under their ovoid foliage.  The small, fuzzy peaches, hard and green, slowly develop light pink, cream-colored blushes as the branches sag down with the weight.  The cabbages, fat and round, nest on top of the warm earth.  Potatoes as ruby and gold treasures, are loaded in every mound of soil dug.   Peas and beans hang fat upon the vines.  The carrots deep green feather tops draw the sun energy into the golden orange roots.  Sunchoke stems thrust from their distended, twisted tubers, taller than a human as they enclose the kids’ Sunchoke House.  Basil and parsley fill their bushy stems with tender green leaves.  

The farm crew work all day from the cool morning stringing tomatoes and cutting lettuce to the warm-hot, roasting, afternoon heat, toasting faces and arms to various shades of brown as they weed row upon row of vegetables in the fading light.  As the wind blows the dust, dirt, and pollen in our eyes and mouths, they look forward to an upcoming dip in the neighbor’s pond.  

When this season is over, what will our reward have been?  Is it for the tired backs? The fatigued fingers?  The sun or plant rashes on our arms and legs? Or rather is it for a walk on a starry evening, while we listen to the bull frogs near and far in the swamps, and feel the soft, warm air tenderly enveloping our body and mind, carrying us away in the clouds through the night to hold this moment of sweet delight?  To taste the cold water from the irrigation hose after a hot, dusty afternoon in the sun?  To lay in the grass under the shade of the ripening fruit trees and relax the bent back and knees from a long morning’s harvest? To eat the crispy, sweet, green leaves of lettuce, of amaranth, of chard, of kale fresh in the field? To enjoy the long hours of light that dance upon the green, glowing leaves of the trees?  To fully embrace and to be part of this summer wonder?

Perhaps this is our greatest reward, the pleasant and pleasing beauty of the land basking in the moonlight or dazzled by the sunlight.  To observe all life, growing, eating, reproducing, diseasing, dying, decaying, and beginning anew.  Appreciating and knowing that life will continue.  These are the signs of summer.

RECIPES

HERB ROASTED POTATOES & PEARL ONIONS (from http://www.thecomfortofcooking.com/2010/02/herb-roasted-potatoes-pearl-onions.html)  Serves 4
2 pounds red potatoes, well-scrubbed and cut into quarters
1 bunch scallions or 1 small onion
2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp fresh basil or parsley, minced
2 tsp. dried thyme
1 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. dried rosemary
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Spray a cookie sheet with nonstick cooking spray.  Boil a pot of water (fill about 2 inches deep). Once boiling, add onions and parboil for 5-6 minutes, or until skins begin to loosen. Drain water, fill pot with cold water and peel skins until you have a tender, translucent onion. In a large mixing bowl, combine olive oil, basil, thyme, paprika, salt, rosemary and pepper. Add potatoes and onions. Toss with your hands to coat lightly with oil and seasonings. Transfer to the cookie sheet. Bake 20 minutes, or until potatoes are browned and tender. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and serve.

ZUCCHINI CUCUMBER SOUP (from Gourmet, August 2006)
1 lb zucchini or summer squash variety, chopped
3/4 lb cucumber (about 2 cups) or scoop seeds out
1/3 cup chopped green onion or sweet onion
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 cup water
1 tsp chopped fresh hot green chile
1 1/8 tsp salt
1 tsp ground coriander
1/2 cup creme fraiche (4 oz) or plain yogurt

Garnish with fresh basil, dill, or parsley, chopped
Puree zucchini, cucumber, onion, vinegar, water, chile, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon coriander in a blender until very smooth.  Whisk remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon coriander into creme fraiche or yogurt.  Serve topped with dollops of creme fraiche or yogurt and basil or parsley. 

2020: Week 7, July 5 – 11

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #7
July 5-11, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.   You can always find past newsletters on our website at http://www.tantrefarm.com/newsletters/!

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA or SPICY GREENS: You will receive either Arugula (known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor) OR Spicy Greens (gourmet-quality, peppery greens for quick cooking or a salad; includes Kale, Tatsoi, Hon Tsai Tai, Green and Red Mustard).
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS: round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and medium-tall, red-veined green leaves.
-How to use: greens can be substituted for spinach and chard in recipes; roots good in soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store: separate roots from leaves and store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks;

BROCCOLI (Amadeus):  medium-sized, fancy heads that are deep emerald green with tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CABBAGE: You will receive one of the following:  Farao (delicious early cabbage; attractive deep green, 3-lb. heads are filled with tender, thin, crisp, peppery-sweet leaves) or Caraflex (pointed mini cabbage, extremely uniform, small heads with good wrapper leaves. Inner leaves are tender, crunchy, and have an excellent, sweet and mild cabbage flavor. Perfect for summer salads, slaws, or cooked dishes) or Red Express (solid, round, 2-4 lb. red heads with good appearance and flavor).  See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Mokum):  sweet, slender, “pencil carrot” with edible green leaves.  Greens are delicious in soups and also salads. See feature article.  See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes.  Use this link for garlic scape recipes:  http://sfc.smallfarmcentral.com/dynamic_content/uploadfiles/3774/GARLIC%20SCAPES%207%20Great%20Ideas.doc).  See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH GARLIC:  a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, bolstering the immune system, lowering blood pressure and preventing heart disease, used as an expectorant or decongestant, and at least some people believe that it can ward off vampires and insects.
-Cooking tips:  To mellow garlic’s strong flavors opt for longer cooking; to enjoy its more pungent flavors and increased medicinal benefit, use it raw or with minimal cooking.
-How to use:  minced raw in salad dressings, sautéed and added to stir-fries, meats, vegetables; make garlic butter with 1/2 cup of softened butter mashed with four minced cloves of garlic; try roasting garlic by cutting off tops of garlic bulb, so cloves are exposed, brush with olive oil and bake for 1 hour at 350 degrees, squeeze garlic out of skins and spread on a good, crusty bread.
-How to store: fresh garlic can be stored in an open, breathable basket in a cool, dark place for many months.

NO HERB BUNCH THIS WEEK!  Most of our herbs are taking longer to grow back with this heat and lack of rain, so  we are letting our smaller  patches of herbs recuperate.

LETTUCE: rich in calcium and vitamins A and C; you will receive Red or Green Leaf.  See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUGAR SNAP PEAS: flat-round pod of edible-pod pea; often lighter green than the shelling pea pod.  See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor; good source of vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron and calcium.
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.  

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. FAMILY FARM HIKE on FRIDAY, July 10, at 4 PM: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm with CSA member, Alisse Portnoy, who teaches at the University of Michigan. She and her daughter are in their eleventh year of once-a-week, long visits to the farm. They look forward to sharing some of its treasures and treasure spots with you. We’ll use all our senses and appropriate social distancing as we take an approx. 45-60 minute hike. Please bring your own mask for use indoors in case you need to use the restroom.  Meet at the picnic tables behind the Main House at 4 pm.

2. ZOOM WALKS: During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day.  All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The next one is July 10 at 2 PM: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89437079313?pwd=Ti8yQVU3dU9yOTVDS2J1YWZEbmxmZz09 PW: 539457More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

3. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at most sites as well.  

4. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER: *Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.

*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time)
*Farm (Wed)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
*Pure Pastures (Wed) (limited site) —9 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 9 AM – 11 PM)
*Farm (Fri)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
*Community High School (Sat) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON & FRAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
*RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)-9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

EAT YOUR CARROT GREEN TOPS (THE LEAVES) (from www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/recipes.html#tops)
There is some debate about whether you can eat the green leaves.  Despite the presence of celery and carrots in the carrot family of Apiaceae (“umbellifers”), many other members of the family are highly poisonous, but not carrot.  They ARE edible and are highly nutritive, rich in protein, minerals and vitamins.  The tops of the carrots are loaded with potassium which can make them bitter, so the use of them in food is limited.  However, it is edible, so you may mix some in with a mixed lettuce salad.  You may also use it for garnish.  Combine your common sense and your creative skills, and invent something!  That’s what makes cooking fun.  It is a form of art.  Carrot greens are high in vitamin K, which is lacking in the carrot itself.

The leaves do contain furocoumarins that may cause allergic contact dermatitis from the leaves, especially when wet.  Later exposure to the sun may cause mild photodermatitis.  (This is NOT the same as ‘poisonous’ – it will only affect susceptible people with allergies to the plant. Some people have the same reaction to yarrow, ragwort, chamomile etc.).  There is a distinct difference between toxins and allergens.  Carrots (Daucus carota), whether wild or domesticated, are not toxic, they are allergenic.  This is like peanuts, which are not toxic but can kill those who are allergic to them.  It is however important that any wild plant be positively identified before it is used for food.

Carrot greens have antiseptic qualities, so they have been added to mouthwashes and, mixed with honey, to disinfect sores.  They are also diuretic (increase urine flow), and can help treat kidney disease and edema.

Here are some cooking suggestions.  The carrot leaves are pretty, but bitter, so what about using it on something that is robust in flavor, but boring in appearance?  Decorate a pate with it, and glace it with aspic. What about “carrot top pesto vinaigrette”?  You can hide the bitterness under the tangy vinegar, and sweeten it slightly with some honey.  Try sauteing the chopped carrot tops lightly in olive oil with garlic and onion.  Then add other garden-grown veggies (the carrots themselves, zucchini, tomato, peppers, fresh herbs), sauté some more, then fold the entire garden mish-mash inside a whole wheat tortilla, brown it, and call it a quesadilla.  Truly a great vegan treat, and the carrot tops gave a nice crunchy texture. It is a delightful garden feast.  I recommend adding your carrot tops to other things you may already have simmering on the stove.  

**Carrot Top Soup is a favorite at the farm. Please try it below!!

RECIPES

SAUTEED GARLIC SCAPES WITH BROCCOLI  (from http://www.chatfieldcsa.org/recipe/sauteed-garlic-scapes-with-broccoli)
5-10  garlic scapes
1 head broccoli
Olive Oil
Salt and Pepper (just a sprinkle of each)
Fresh parmesan cheese
Cut the scapes into 2 to 3 inch pieces so they almost look like green beans. Cut the broccoli up into small florets as you would do for a stir fry. Heat oil in a skillet and add broccoli and cut scapes. Add salt and pepper to taste and cook until the broccoli turns a bright green (about 3 minutes). Remove from heat and serve right away. Sprinkle with fresh parmesan if you so desire.

CARROT TOP SOUP (Local Flavors by Deborah Madison) Serves 4.
1 bunch (6 small to medium) carrots, tops and bottoms
2 Tbs. butter
3 Tbs. white rice
2 large leeks (or 2 summer onions)
2 thyme sprigs
2 Tbs. chopped dill or parsley
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
6 c. vegetable or chicken stock or water
Pull the lacy leaves of the carrot greens off their stems (2 to 3 cups, loosely packed).  Wash, then chop finely.  Grate the carrots, or finely chop them.  Melt the butter in a soup pot.  Add the carrot tops and carrots, rice, leeks, thyme, and dill.  Cook for several minutes, turning everything a few times, then season with 1-1/2 teaspoons salt and add the stock.  Bring to a boil and simmer until the rice is cooked, 16 to 18 minutes.  Season with salt, pepper and serve.

2020: Week 6, June 28 – July 4

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #6
June 28 – July 4, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.   You can always find past newsletters on our website at http://www.tantrefarm.com/newsletters/!

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA (Sylvetta): also known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor.  See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BROCCOLI:  You will receive either Amadeus (standard, medium-sized, fancy heads that are deep emerald green with tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems) or the bunched Mini Broccoli (tender, flavorful, and colorful green florets and shoots that are excellent for bunching; delicious steamed, sauteed, grilled, stir-fried, and eaten fresh).
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week.

CARROTS (Mokum):  a very sweet, slender, “pencil carrot” with edible green leaves.  Greens are delicious in soups and also salads.
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:  Remove greens from roots and refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; greens may last up to a week refrigerated in plastic bag.

COLLARD GREENS: dark-green, flat, large leaf; may be substituted for kale or other hearty greens recipes; use large leaf rolled up as a wrap and stuff with vegetables or hummus.  
-How to use: for salads, soups, and light cooking.
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes.  Use this link for garlic scape recipes:  http://sfc.smallfarmcentral.com/dynamic_content/uploadfiles/3774/GARLIC%20SCAPES%207%20Great%20Ideas.doc).  See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS:  In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.  
You will randomly receive one the following 5 options in your box:
1. Lemon Balm: these fragrant lemon-minty leaves make a delicate herbal tea, served hot or cold; good addition to lettuce or fruit salads and ice cream; nicely paired with grilled fish or lamb and tossed with steamed vegetables; also aids in depression, tension, or nausea.

2. Black-Stemmed Peppermint: superior fragrance and flavor; forest green leaves with deep purple veins and stems, purple flowers; leaves are good as a hot or iced tea, and adds a delicious flavor when minced and added to cooked peas, carrots, potatoes, salads, and fresh strawberries.

3. Mojito Mint: this mint has a green stem with large green, crinkly leaves and has a much milder flavor with hints of citrus, which make it good in salads, desserts, smoothies, and even your water bottle; great for muddling in cocktails.

4. French Sorrel: slightly tart, lemon-flavored green; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces; can be used in omelets, pesto, breads, or cooked as a side dish; leaves are shaped like spinach, but paler green in color; refrigerate in bag for up to 3 days

5. Winter Savory: a semi-evergreen herb; its strong spicy flavor goes well with beans and meat; medicinally it has antiseptic, aromatic, carminative, and digestive benefits, as well as relieves bee stings; fresh savory has a strong spicy-peppery flavor and resinous odor similar to fresh thyme

LETTUCE: rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C; you will receive 2 heads of either Romaine, Red, or Green Leaf.  See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUGAR SNAP PEAS: flat-round pod of edible-pod pea; often lighter green than the shelling pea pod.
-How to use: add peas to soups, stews, sautes, or stir-fries; blanch or steam for 2-4 minutes only until color is bright green; snap or snow peas can be eaten raw in salads or cooked quickly as in stir-fries or deep fry in tempura batter.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 4-5 days; if kept too long, their sweet flavor and crisp texture diminishes.  

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: a bunch of white salad turnips with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture.  Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium, and delicious raw!) and greens are edible! See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GREEN or GOLDEN ZUCCHINI:  You will receive Green Zucchini (uniform cylindrical, green fruits with mild flavor) or Golden Zucchini (gourmet golden zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits).
-How to use: use in salads, dips, grilled, casseroles, stuffed, or mashed with butter and seasonings.
-How to store: store in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED:  We have plenty of weeds to pull.  If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm, come join us.  Please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark. Thanks for volunteering!

2. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at most sites as well.  Please let our volunteers know if you need help.

3. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

4. FAMILY FARM HIKE on FRIDAY, July 10, at 4 PM: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm with CSA member, Alisse Portnoy, who teaches at the University of Michigan. She and her daughter are in their eleventh year of once-a-week, long visits to the farm. They look forward to sharing some of its treasures and treasure spots with you.   We’ll use all our senses and appropriate social distancing as we take an approx. 45-60 minute hike. Please bring your own mask for use indoors in case you need to use the restroom.  Meet at the picnic tables behind the Main House at 4 pm.

5. ZOOM WALKS: These walks take place in a variety of locations in central and southern Michigan. During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day.  All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The next one is July 10: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89437079313?pwd=Ti8yQVU3dU9yOTVDS2J1YWZEbmxmZz09 PW: 539457More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

6. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.
-Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
-MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time)
-Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
-Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
-Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —9 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 9 AM – 11 PM)
-Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
-Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON & FRAN for check-in for the whole time)
-Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in for the whole time)
-Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
-Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
-RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

RECIPES
**Keep in mind typing any combination of share items with the word “recipe” after it on the internet, and many recipe ideas will appear.  

BROCCOLI WITH SAVORY
1 broccoli head
1/4 cup chicken stock
1 Tbsp plain flour
1/2 cup sour cream
Salt 3/4 cup fine dry breadcrumbs and pepper
3 Tbsp chives, finely snipped OR garlic scapes
1 Tbsp savory, chopped
1-2 Tbsp butter
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  In a saucepan, over low heat, combine the stock and flour.  Add the broccoli and stir to combine.  Remove from heat and add the sour cream, salt and pepper.  Pour into an ovenproof casserole dish.  Combine the breadcrumbs, chives and savory.  Sprinkle on top of broccoli and dot with 1-2 tablespoons butter.  Bake for 25-30 minutes or until broccoli is tender.

INDIAN STYLE TURNIPS OR RADISH (contributed by CSA member, Anu Whitelocke)
Serve as side dish or main meal for one person.
1 bunch turnips and greens or 1 bunch radishes and greens (well washed and chopped)
1 tsp turmeric
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
1-2 Tbsp oil
Chili powder, to taste
Salt, to taste
1 tsp coriander powder
2-3 garlic scapes chopped
In saute pan, heat oil on high heat.  Add turmeric, mustard seeds, chili powder, coriander powder, salt.  Stir over med-high heat for 2-3 min.  Add turnips (root) and coat well with oil/spice mixture.  Cook over med-high heat for a couple of minutes.  Add garlic scapes and greens.  Continue to cook on med-high heat for a couple of minutes.  Turn heat down to low and cover for 5 minutes.  Cook until desired consistency for turnips is achieved.

MINTED PEAS AND RICE WITH FETA (from Eatingwell.com)
1 1/4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
3/4 cup instant brown rice
1 1/2 cups snap peas
3/4 cup sliced scallions OR garlic scapes
1/4 cup finely crumbled feta cheese
1/4 cup sliced fresh mint
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
Bring broth to a boil in a large saucepan over high heat.  Add rice and bring to a simmer; cover, reduce heat to medium-low and cook for 4 minutes.  Stir in peas and return to a simmer over high heat.  Cover, reduce heat to medium-low and continue to cook until the peas are hot and the rice has absorbed most of the liquid, about 6 minutes.  Remove from heat and stir in scallions, feta, mint and pepper.  Cover and let stand until the liquid is absorbed, 3-5 minutes.

2020: Week 5, June 21 – 27

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #5
June 21-27, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We  try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.   You can always find past newsletters on our website at http://www.tantrefarm.com/newsletters/!

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable.
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week.

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes.  Use this link for garlic scape recipes:  http://sfc.smallfarmcentral.com/dynamic_content/uploadfiles/3774/GARLIC%20SCAPES%207%20Great%20Ideas.doc).
-How to use: mild garlic flavor, so delicious chopped in salads, roasted, and sauteed.  
-How to store: put in refrigerator in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

NO HERB BUNCH THIS WEEK!  Most of our herbs are taking longer to grow back due to the early freeze in May and the dry stretches over the past few months, so  we are letting our smaller  patches of herbs recuperate.

KALE (Lacinato):  dark green, noncurled, blistered leaves, but heavily savoyed; very high in calcium, iron, vitamins A and C, and good source of fiber and folic acid.  
-How to use: for salads, soups, and light cooking.
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

KOHLRABI: delicious  bulbous member of the cabbage family about the size of a golf ball to tennis ball size with greens attached; greenish white or purple  skin and crisp, apple-white flesh tubers.  Most people enjoy taking the skin off and eating them raw, like an apple with a taste and texture somewhere between cabbage and broccoli stems. See feature article in this newsletter and recipes on the Tantre Farm website.
-How to use: good steamed and then mashed with potatoes, added to soups or stews, or delicious sliced and eaten raw with dip.
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to a month.

LETTUCE: rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C; you will receive 2 heads of either Romaine, Red, or Green Leaf.  See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LEEKS or SCALLIONS: You will receive either Scallions  (see below) or Leeks  (young plants with green leaves and white to pale green stems varying in size. The leaves and stems are full of mild-tasting onion flavor, so tender and flavorful from salads to cooking.
Cooking tip: slit from top to bottom and wash thoroughly with root facing up to remove all of the dirt trapped between the leaf layers.
See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

RADISHES: You will receive either  Pink Beauty (pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor) OR Bacchus (stunning purple, round radish with white inner flesh. Very good flavor and not too hot).  See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SCALLIONS “Green Onions” or LEEKS:  You will either receive Leeks  (see above) or Scallions (young shoots of red or green onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants, high in potassium and source of vitamins C and B-6).
-How to use: the bulb, flowers, and green leaves are edible; can be cooked, grilled, roasted whole as a vegetable; chopped in salads, soups, and other dishes for flavor.
-How to store: refrigerate in damp towel/plastic bag for 5-7 days.

SPINACH (Red Kitten):  You will receive a bunch of this crisp, medium green leaf with red veins; high in beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C.
– How to use:  juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, sauté, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
– How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: a bunch of white salad turnips with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture.  Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium, and delicious raw!) and greens are edible! See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. 4th of July VACATIONS or OUT OF TOWN: Yes, we will have distribution as usual on July 4. Please let us know of changes in pick up days or locations this week and next week. Also keep in mind that Pick Up Rescheduling needs to be made within the same week (Sun.-Sat.). All changes can be made yourself on our website on the registration page under Membership Actions box  or you can email us with your request using specific dates and locations.  Here is a link to our website on what to do if you can’t pick up your share on your usual day: http://www.tantrefarm.com/faq/#oot

2. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED:  We have plenty of weeds to pull.  If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm, come join us.  Please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark. Thanks for volunteering!

3. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at most sites as well.  Please let our volunteers know if you need help.

4. FAMILY FARM HIKE on FRIDAY, June 26, at 4 PM: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm with CSA member, Alisse Portnoy, who teaches at the University of Michigan. She and her daughter are in their eleventh year of once-a-week, long visits to the farm. They look forward to sharing some of its treasures and treasure spots with you.   We’ll use all our senses and appropriate social distancing as we take an approx. 45-60 minute hike. Please bring your own mask for use indoors in case you need to use the restroom.  Meet at the picnic tables behind the Main House at 4 pm.

5. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

6. TANTRE FARM PLANT WALK ON SUNDAY, JUNE 28, from 1:00 – 3:00 pm:  We are offering a leisurely plant walk at Tantre Farm with the guidance of our local foraging expert, Rachel Mifsud. Plant walks are excellent learning opportunities for those with beginning to intermediate foraging skills, and for anyone wishing to increase their knowledge of the local flora. Class is limited to 8 participants so that social distance can be maintained while still allowing everyone to see and hear clearly. The cost is $25 with limited spaces, and you must register ahead of time at https://willforageforfood.square.site/

7. ZOOM WALKS: These walks take place in a variety of locations in central and southern Michigan. During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day.  All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The next one is June 30: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84804722068?pwd=VjJFaU1vWFdkUW9nSHVUbDdqYlZXdz09 PW: 124970 More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

8. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER: **Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.
-Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
-MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time)
-Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
-Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
-Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —9 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 9 AM – 11 PM)
-Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
-Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON & FRAN for check-in for the whole time)
-Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in for the whole time)
-Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
-Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
-RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

IS AT AN APPLE? IS IT A JICUMA? NO, IT’S KOHLRABI!
When is a root vegetable not a root vegetable?  When it’s a small bulbous member of the cabbage family called kohlrabi, that’s when.  For all intents and purposes, kohlrabi appears to be a root vegetable in the same company as turnips, radishes and rutabagas.  However, the bulbous shape of kohlrabi is caused by a swelling of the plant’s stem near the ground.  In that sense, kohlrabi is more of a tightly packed version of its cousin, the cabbage.  In fact, the name “kohlrabi” is derived from two German words: “kohl” meaning cabbage and “rabi” meaning turnip.  It is not unusual to hear the term “turnip cabbage” to describe kohlrabi.
Despite its connections to cabbage and turnips, steamed or boiled kohlrabi is said to taste more like broccoli or Brussels sprouts.  Indeed, kohlrabi is in the same general category, the Brassica oleracea Gongylodes group, as the broccoli it resembles in flavor.  It can also be used in lieu of cabbage in many of the sausage and cabbage dishes favored in German cooking.
A raw kohlrabi can also be eaten like an apple, although it contains far less sugar.  Some people find the taste of raw kohlrabi to be an acquired one, but many people who were raised in largely German communities in the Midwest grew up eating kohlrabi whenever it was in season.  One town in Illinois even held annual festivals in honor of the Kohlrabi, so don’t be surprised if one of our small towns in Michigan decides we are due for a celebration of Kohlrabi.

RECIPES

KALE AND KOHLRABI SALAD (http://canolaeatwell.com/recipe/kohlrabi-and-kale-slaw)
4 cups kale, chopped
1 kohlrabi bulb, peeled and julienned
1/2 cup shredded carrots
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup toasted pecans

Dressing
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon minced garlic or garlic scapes
1/4 cup olive oil
salt and pepper
Combine kale, kohlrabi, carrots, dried cranberries and pecans in a large bowl. In a small bowl whisk together red wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, honey, minced garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper.  Mix dressing with salad until well coated.  Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving.

SAUTEED GARLIC SCAPES WITH BROCCOLI  (from http://www.chatfieldcsa.org/recipe/sauteed-garlic-scapes-with-broccoli)
5-10  garlic scapes
1 head broccoli
Olive Oil
Salt and Pepper (just a sprinkle of each)
Fresh parmesan cheese
Cut the scapes into 2 to 3 inch pieces so they almost look like green beans. Cut the broccoli up into small florets as you would do for a stir fry. Heat oil in a skillet and add broccoli and cut scapes. Add salt and pepper to taste and cook until the broccoli turns a bright green (about 3 minutes). Remove from heat and serve right away. Sprinkle with fresh parmesan if you so desire.

2020: Week 4, June 14 – 20

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #4
June 14-20, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BOK CHOY (Joi Choi) or NAPA CABBAGE:  You will receive Napa Cabbage (described below) or Bok Choy (also called “joi choi” or written as “bok choi” sometimes;  a traditional stir-fry vegetable from China with a sweet and mild flavor; looks like white Swiss chard with the stems all attached at the bottom; considered a cool weather crop; part of the cabbage or turnip family).
-How to use: two vegetables in one–the leaves can be cooked like spinach, and the crisp stem can be eaten like celery or asparagus; excellent in stir-fries, soups, sauteed or eaten raw.
-How to store: store as you would any green–in a loose plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator.

NAPA CABBAGE or BOK CHOY: You will receive Bok Choy (described above) or Napa Cabbage (crinkly, thickly veined leaves, which are cream-colored with celadon green tips; unlike the strong-flavored waxy leaves on round cabbage heads, these are thin, crisp, and delicately mild; good source of vitamin A, folic acid, and potassium).
-How to use: use raw, saute, bake, or braised; common in stir-fries and main ingredient in traditional kimchi; also eaten raw as a wrap for pork or oysters; the outer, tougher leaves are used in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate, tightly wrapped, up to 5 days.  

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes.  Use this link for garlic scape recipes:  http://sfc.smallfarmcentral.com/dynamic_content/uploadfiles/3774/GARLIC%20SCAPES%207%20Great%20Ideas.doc.
-How to use: mild garlic flavor, so delicious chopped in salads, roasted, and sauteed.  
-How to store: put in refrigerator in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

FRESH HERBS:  You will be receiving fresh herbs off and on throughout the summer, since harvesting them often means they need a few weeks to recover before we harvest again.  We will be giving you a surprise herb treat in your box this week.  Please let us know if yours was missed, since we had some left over, and we are not sure if our new interns missed a few boxes.  We apologize but we do have them at the farm or at the market tables if it matters to you.  Here are a couple of links to help you know more about how to use fresh herbs: https://www.urbancultivator.net/cooking-with-fresh-herbs/.  The following is a good link to help you identify your herb with images and descriptions:  http://theherbexchange.com/25-best-herbs-to-grow-in-your-kitchen-garden/.  Lovage is the only herb missing from these images, and it has a very distinctive celery flavor (see below).  In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.  Enjoy!
*Chamomile— These small, daisy-like flowers are best known for making a soothing tea; also the flowers make a pretty garnish and a flavorful addition to salads.  The whole bundle can be used fresh or dried upside down for a week or two, and then the flowers plucked and put into a jar for a restful, calming, sleepy time tea for the winter.
*Chives: mild, onion-flavored herb with long, slender, hollow leaves; often used as a garnish or chopped into any foods that call for onion; good in soups, egg dishes, and meat.
 *Bronze-leaf Fennel – anise-flavored, feathered foliage; can be used as garnish or flavor enhancer for salads, soups, and eggs
*Lovage— celery flavored herb, good in vegetarian soups and stews, especially potato or tomato dishes; use sparingly, since it does have a strong flavor.
*Oregano—This member of the mint family is similar to marjoram, but not as sweet and more pungent, spicy flavor and no mint aroma; good in soups and tomato-based dishes.  
*Thyme– tiny green leaves used in meat and vegetable dishes and most casseroles, soups, stews, and medicinal teas, which soothe sore throats.  Some of the thyme has gone to flower, so the leaves are small, but the flowers are dainty and delicious and can be chopped up along with the leaves.

KALE/COLLARDS: these have a sweet, mild, cabbage flavor and are interchangeable with broccoli, mustard greens, and other hearty greens in recipes; rich source of phytochemicals, which studies have shown can ward off various forms of cancer; highest protein content of all the cultivated vegetables; very high in calcium, iron, vitamins A and C, and good source of fiber and folic acid.  
-How to use: for salads, soups, and light cooking.
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

LETTUCE: rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C; you will receive either Romaine, Red, or Green Leaf.
-How to use: raw in salads or (believe it or not!) use in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

SUGAR SNAP PEAS: flat-round pod of edible-pod pea; often lighter green than the shelling pea pod.
-How to use: add peas to soups, stews, sautes, or stir-fries; blanch or steam for 2-4 minutes only until color is bright green; snap or snow peas can be eaten raw in salads or cooked quickly as in stir-fries or deep fry in tempura batter.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 4-5 days; if kept too long, their sweet flavor and crisp texture diminishes.  

RADISHES (Pink Beauty): pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

STRAWBERRIES: red, conical fruit with tiny white flowers.  This week each share will receive some fruits of the rose family.  
-How to use: excellent raw, juicing, jam, pie, sorbet, in desserts
-How to store:  Do not wash until you are ready to consume them. Place them on a paper towel in a tightly-covered container in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days.

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: a bunch of white salad turnips with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture.  Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium, and delicious raw!) and greens are edible!  
-How to use: greens good in salads and soups and can be steamed or sauteed with leeks; roots can be roasted, steamed, or sauteed.
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last up to 1-2 weeks in refrigerator.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. 4th of July VACATIONS or OUT OF TOWN: Yes, we will have distribution as usual on July 4. Please let us know of changes in pick up days or locations this week and next week. Also keep in mind that Pick Up Rescheduling needs to be made within the same week (Sun.-Sat.). All changes can be made yourself on our website on the registration page under the Membership Actions box, or you can email us with your request using specific dates and locations.  Here is a link to our website on what to do if you can’t pick up your share on your usual day: http://www.tantrefarm.com/faq/#oot

2. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at most sites as well.  Please let our volunteers know if you need help.

3. FAMILY FARM HIKE on FRIDAY, June 26, at 4 PM: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm with CSA member, Alisse Portnoy, who teaches at the University of Michigan. She and her daughter are in their eleventh year of once-a-week, long visits to the farm. They look forward to sharing some of its treasures and treasure spots with you.   We’ll use all our senses and appropriate social distancing as we take an approx. 45-60 minute hike. Please bring your own mask for use indoors in case you need to use the restroom.  Meet at the picnic tables behind the Main House at 4 pm.

4. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

5. TANTRE FARM PLANT WALK ON SUNDAY, JUNE 28, from 1:00 – 3:00 pm:  We are offering a leisurely plant walk at Tantre Farm with the guidance of our local foraging expert, Rachel Mifsud. Plant walks are excellent learning opportunities for those with beginning to intermediate foraging skills, and for anyone wishing to increase their knowledge of the local flora. Class is limited to 8 participants so that social distance can be maintained while still allowing everyone to see and hear clearly. The cost is $25 with limited spaces, and you must register ahead of time at https://willforageforfood.square.site/

6. ZOOM WALKS: These walks take place in a variety of locations in central and southern Michigan. During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day.  All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The next one is June 20: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87389602881?pwd=OStSRkRFNVhlTFZNQXVndmR3YmtVUT09 PW: 192353 More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER: *Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time)
*Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —9 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 9 AM – 11 PM)
*Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON & FRAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
*RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

RECIPES

STRAWBERRY NAPA SALAD (from https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/strawberry-napa-salad-303013)
1 head Napa cabbage
1 quart strawberries, coarsely diced
1/4 cup slivered almonds
3 tablespoons green onions, finely diced
1 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup milk or coconut milk

Cut Napa cabbage into bite-sized pieces and place into a large bowl.  Add onion, almonds, and strawberries.  Mix mayo, red wine vinegar, and sugar in a medium bowl.  Stir until sugar is dissolved.  Stir and add milk, a little at a time, until milk is incorporated.  Add dressing to the salad mixture and chill.

2020: Week 3, June 7-13

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #3
June 7-13, 2020

    If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.                                             

    In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

    If you are new to our CSA, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA: an aromatic, bright green, salad green with a peppery mustard flavor; rich in iron and vitamins A and C.
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes.
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

ASPARAGUS:  You will receive green or purple spears; each contains vitamins A, B, and C, as well as iron.
– How to use: serve raw, chopped in salads, or with dips. You can also steam, roast, grill.
– How to store: wrap in damp cloth and plastic bag, then refrigerate. Alternatively, bundle spears with rubber band and place upright in container with an inch of water.

NAPA CABBAGE: crinkly, thickly veined leaves, which are cream-colored with celadon green tips; unlike the strong-flavored waxy leaves on round cabbage heads, these are thin, crisp, and delicately mild; good source of vitamin A, folic acid, and potassium.
-How to use: use raw, saute, bake, or braised; common in stir-fries and main ingredient in traditional kimchi; also eaten raw as a wrap for pork or oysters; the outer, tougher leaves are used in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate, tightly wrapped, up to 5 days.

LEEKS: These are young plants with green leaves and white to pale green stems varying in size. The leaves and stems are full of mild-tasting onion flavor, so tender and flavorful from salads to cooking.
Cooking tip: slit from top to bottom and wash thoroughly with root facing up to remove all of the dirt trapped between the leaf layers.
-How to use: white and lower part of greens can be cooked whole, chopped in slices and substituted for onions; delicious raw in salads or cooked in soups, quiches, casseroles, stews, stocks, or stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed for 2 weeks in plastic bag.

LETTUCE: rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C; you will receive at least 2 varieties: Red and/or Green Leaf.
-How to use: raw in salads or (believe it or not!) use in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

MUSHROOMS (Oyster): **These bags of mushrooms are only for WEDNESDAY CSA members this week, since FRI/SAT CSA MEMBERS received a surprise bag 2 weeks ago, when we had a sudden, unexpected flush of mushrooms with Week 1 share. These white, golden, or gray oyster-shaped caps have a mild, anise, earthy odor.
-How to use: brush off dirt to clean or wipe with damp cloth, do not wash or submerge in water; good grilled, sauteed, steamed, in soups, and in sandwiches.
-How to store: place in paper bag or wax bag and keep in refrigerator for up to 5-7 days.

PEA SHOOTS:  You will receive pea shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market year round or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

RADISHES: You will receive 2 of the following radishes –  Pink Beauty (pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor) or Cherriette (smooth, bright red roots with short green, edible tops and a sweet/mildly hot taste) or Bacchus (stunning, purple, round radish with white inner flesh. Very good flavor and not too hot).
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries and are an excellent source of vitamins.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SPINACH:  crisp, dark green leaf; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron and a plethora of other nutrients and antioxidants.  
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: a bunch of white salad turnips with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture.  Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium, and delicious raw!) and greens are edible!  
-How to use: greens good in salads and soups and can be steamed or sauteed with leeks; roots can be roasted, steamed, or sauteed.
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last up to 1-2 weeks in refrigerator.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at most sites as well.  Please let our volunteers know if you need help.

2. FAMILY FARM HIKE on FRIDAY, June 26, at 4 PM: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm with CSA member, Alisse Portnoy, who teaches at the University of Michigan. She and her daughter are in their eleventh year of once-a-week, long visits to the farm. They look forward to sharing some of its treasures and treasure spots with you.   We’ll use all our senses and appropriate social distancing as we take an approx. 45-60 minute hike. Please bring your own mask for use indoors in case you need to use the restroom.  Meet at the picnic tables behind the Main House at 4 pm.

3. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

4. TANTRE FARM PLANT WALK ON SUNDAY, JUNE 28, from 1:00 – 3:00 pm:  We are offering a leisurely plant walk at Tantre Farm with the guidance of our local foraging expert, Rachel Mifsud. Plant walks are excellent learning opportunities for those with beginning to intermediate foraging skills, and for anyone wishing to increase their knowledge of the local flora. Class is limited to 8 participants so that social distance can be maintained while still allowing everyone to see and hear clearly. The cost is $25 with limited spaces, and you must register ahead of time at https://willforageforfood.square.site/

5. ZOOM WALKS: These walks take place in a variety of locations in central and southern Michigan. During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day. Please mute your microphone when you come on so that background noise is not distracting to other students. All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The first one is June 10: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86926811587?pwd=TFhUTWVsMjJlYnZxWWZCRGltc2RiQT09 PW: 968077. More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

6. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED:  We have plenty of weeds to pull.  If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm or any other time, please come join us.  Please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark. Thanks for volunteering!

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER: **Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time)
*Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —10 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 10 AM – 12 PM)
*Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON & FRAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in for the whole time)
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
*RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

THE FORCE OF THE FLEA BEETLE
by Andy and Richard    

    The flea beetle is a highly skilled jumper, but equally adept at targeting the tender leaves of many vegetables such as arugula, cabbage, radishes, and turnips in your CSA box this week, the bok choy in last week’s share, and the kale in next week’s share.  Sometimes we are able to prevent the flea beetles’ voracious appetite with row cover or fleece covering the crop, but every so often they outwit us and get to the plants before we can protect them. Although these pests leave pepper shot-like holes after feasting, they do not destroy the flavor, texture, or nutritional value of these delicious greens. So, please enjoy your food, especially after sharing it with our tiny flea beetle friends!!

RECIPES

RADISH TOP PESTO (adapted www.Fromachefskitchen.com)
4 cups radish tops (can be mixed with turnip greens, arugula), washed and dried
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
Juice of 1/2 a lemon
1/2 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted in a cast iron pan
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil plus more as needed
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

    Put first 6 ingredients in a food processor and puree until whipped and smooth, adding more oil, if needed. (If you don’t have a food processor, an immersion blender, a blender, or even a mortar & pestle will do the trick.).  Add salt/pepper to your own taste. Put this pesto on pasta, bread, sandwiches, etc.  Great way to store excess greens in frozen patties or ice cube trays for the winter!!

NAPA CABBAGE SALAD (by Carol from www.allrecipes.com)  Serves 6
1 head Napa cabbage
1 bunch minced green onions (or 1 bunch leeks)
1/3 cup butter
1 (3 oz) package ramen noodles, broken
2 Tbsp sesame seeds
1 cup slivered almonds
1/4 cup cider vinegar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup white sugar
2 Tbsp soy sauce

    Finely shred the head of cabbage; do not chop.  Combine the green onions and cabbage in a large bowl, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Make the crunchies: melt the butter in a pot.  Mix the ramen noodles, sesame seeds and almonds into the pot with the melted butter.  Spoon the mixture onto a baking sheet and bake the crunchies in the preheated 350 degrees oven, turning often to make sure they do not burn.  When they are browned remove them from the oven.  Make the dressing: in a small saucepan, heat vinegar, oil, sugar, and soy sauce.  Bring the mixture to a boil, let boil for 1 minute.  Remove the pan from heat and let cool.  Combine dressing, crunchies, and cabbage immediately before serving.  Serve right away or the crunchies will get soggy.

2020: Week 2, May 31 – June 6

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #2
May 31-June 6, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

If you are new to our CSA, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ASPARAGUS:  You will receive green or purple spears; each contains vitamins A, B, and C, as well as iron.
– How to use: serve raw, chopped in salads, or with dips. You can also steam, roast, grill.
– How to store: wrap in damp cloth and plastic bag, then refrigerate. Alternatively, bundle spears with rubber band and place upright in container with an inch of water.

BOK CHOY (Joi Choi): written as bok choi, a traditional stir-fry vegetable from China with a sweet and mild flavor; looks like white Swiss chard with the stems all attached at the bottom; considered a cool weather crop; part of the cabbage or turnip family.
-How to use: two vegetables in one–the leaves can be cooked like spinach, and the crisp stem can be eaten like celery or asparagus; excellent in stir-fries, soups, sauteed or eaten raw.
-How to store: store as you would any green–in a loose plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator.

LEEKS: These are young plants with green leaves and white to pale green stems varying in size. The leaves and stems are full of mild-tasting onion flavor, so tender and flavorful from salads to cooking.
Cooking tip: slit from top to bottom and wash thoroughly with root facing up to remove all of the dirt trapped between the leaf layers.
-How to use: white and lower part of greens can be cooked whole, chopped in slices and substituted for onions; delicious raw in salads or cooked in soups, quiches, casseroles, stews, stocks, or stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed for 2 weeks in plastic bag.

PEA or SUNFLOWER SHOOTS:  You will receive pea shoots OR sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market year round or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

RADISHES (Cherriette): smooth, bright red roots with short green, edible tops and a sweet/mildly hot taste.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens. (excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s) delicious in soups or stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SPINACH:  crisp, dark green leaf; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron and a plethora of other nutrients and antioxidants.  
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: You will receive a bunch of white salad turnips with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture.  Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium) and greens are edible!  
-How to use: greens good in salads and soups and can be steamed or sauteed with leeks; roots can be roasted, steamed, or sauteed.
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last up to 1-2 weeks in refrigerator.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. MASKS & GLOVES: We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at some sites as well.  Please let our volunteers know if you need help.

2. PAYMENTS DUE:  If you still owe money, you will see it in the Balance Due column on the Pick up Sheet.  Please let us know if you think there is a mistake.   Please finalize payments soon.

3. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

4. CHELSEA AND ANN ARBOR FARMERS MARKETS ARE OPEN:  We will have market tables set up at the Ann Arbor Market for onsite sales on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 7 AM – 12 PM, so please feel free to purchase other items to supplement your share.  The Chelsea Farmers Market will continue to have online sales and curbside pick up at this time, but starting Saturday we are allowed to set up our market tables for onsite purchase as well from 8 AM – 1 PM, so hope to see you there!!

5. TANTRE FARM PLANT WALK ON JUNE 26 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm:  
We are offering a leisurely plant walk at Tantre Farm with the guidance of our local foraging expert, Rachel Mifsud. Plant walks are excellent learning opportunities for those with beginning to intermediate foraging skills, and for anyone wishing to increase their knowledge of the local flora. Our discussion will include information about identification, methods of harvest, preparation, and use. We will explore the area and choose around 15 edible, medicinal, or otherwise useful plants and mushrooms to focus on. Class is limited to 8 participants so that social distance can be maintained while still allowing everyone to see and hear clearly. The cost is $25 with limited spaces, and you must register ahead of time at https://willforageforfood.square.site/

6. ZOOM WALKS: These walks take place in a variety of locations in central and southern Michigan. During the walk, Rachel will show you around 15 plants and talk about ID, harvest, use, and preservation of those plants. To participate, you must have Zoom installed on your device. Then you simply copy/paste the link and password shown below for the date you want to attend, and log on at 2 pm that day. Please mute your microphone when you come on so that background noise is not distracting to other students. All walks will be live from 2-3 pm and are donation-based.  You are not required to pay to participate, but it is appreciated when you can.  The first one is June 10: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86926811587?pwd=TFhUTWVsMjJlYnZxWWZCRGltc2RiQT09 PW: 968077. More dates will be shared in upcoming newsletters or you can visit the website: https://willforageforfood.square.site/

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:  If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season, try using the Membership Actions section on the registration page to schedule Vacations or Pick up Location Changes a week ahead of time.  Some sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited” (see below). Please always email ahead to see if the limited sites are at capacity before making any switches on your own to those spaces.

**Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.

*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 7-9 AM)
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—CHANGE IN TIME: 8 AM to 10 AM (SARA for check-in the whole time
*Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)* (Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE for check-in the whole time)
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —10 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA for check-in from 11 AM – 1 PM)
*Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF for check-in from 2 to  4 PM)
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON for check-in from 7 -10 AM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN for check-in the whole time)
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—8 AM to 12 PM (DEB for check-in the whole time)
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF for check-in the whole time)
*RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON for check-in the whole time)

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
by Richard and Deb

With care and attention tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants are nested into their raised growing beds.  Now that the earth is warm with the hope and expectation that these baby plants will grow tall in between trellis poles woven from post to post so that the fruit can dangle above the ground and ripen in abundance.  With this same care all the beds are prepared.  The other spring and summer plants are nestled into the soft, brown, moist soil and then weeded with many hands and hand hoes working together.  

It is in this working together outside in all weather with all the unexpected elements of nature (the morning cool, the afternoon sun, the pelting rain, the cold frost) that we find ourselves getting to know a whole new garden of wonderful personalities.  They sprout from Illinois, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, California, New York,  Maryland, Texas, Ohio, Michigan (of course), and even the Philippines. They come from many walks of life and are rich with diversity.  Each person on the farm has an opportunity to get to know each other and themselves a little better, to have extended conversations for hours sometimes from lunch to supper, sometimes days later.  Then again sometimes they may work quietly side by side with few words spoken between them, just doing the dance of the garden together.  

As we go about our day, there can be a simple amiability between our farm crew members.  We witness an aspiration to create priority in seeing what the most important thing to do for each moment is, and to work effectively as a team to make delicious food for our community.  This involves the weeding, the planting, the spreading of compost, the watering, the harvesting of each type of vegetable in its own special and unique way, and then finally preparing the food to share with each other.  

Most importantly it is in the relationship with one another as individuals, as fellow human beings, that we learn and agree to treat each other with kindness and respect, to honor each other, to listen to one another, to think and talk together, and to relate to each other, despite and because of our differences.  This is the best kind of relationship, where we honor each other for our differences and develop a deeper understanding for each other and ourselves.  With care and attention perhaps, we could consider and hope that all people on this earth would discover this most important thing to do.  

RECIPES

 ROASTED ASPARAGUS-CARROT-SPINACH SOUP (https://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asprecipe=1865971)
1 bunch of Asparagus 
3-4 carrots (peeled & sliced length-wise)
2 cups of Spinach (or Bok Choy)
2 cloves of Garlic
Water – to make vegetable stock
Milk (or alternative milk)- about 2 cups 
Salt & Pepper to taste
Other spices you wish to add
Begin by cutting bottom ends off asparagus (don’t throw away).  Peel the carrots (reserve the peels).  Place asparagus & carrots on tray to roast in oven – set @ 450 for appx. 20 minutes, carrots cooked about 5 minutes longer.  Place the asparagus ends, carrot peels, and garlic in pot. Cover with water and season to taste. Bring to boil, then simmer appx. 20 minutes. This will make your stock.   Combine veggies & splash of stock in blender and begin blending. Add more stock & milk as needed to your taste and continue to blend to the consistency you desire.    Return to pot & keep it warm on the stove & add seasoning here. 

2020: Week 1, May 24 – 30

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #1
May 24-30, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others.  The information provided here is also published each week on our website.  **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

If you are new to our CSA, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA (Sylvetta): also known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: great in salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

ASPARAGUS:  You will receive green or purple spears; each contains vitamins A, B, and C, as well as iron.
– How to use: serve raw, chopped in salads, or with dips. You can also steam, roast, grill.
– How to store: wrap in damp cloth and plastic bag, then refrigerate. Alternatively, bundle spears with rubber band and place upright in container with an inch of water.

GREEN CABBAGE:  This certified organic, late-season cabbage comes from Wayward Seed Farm (http://waywardseed.com). It is excellent for a wide variety of dishes and stores well into late winter.
-How to use:  steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store:  It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.  When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

BABY LEEKS: These are young plants with green leaves and white to pale green stems. The leaves and stems are full of mild-tasting onion flavor, so tender and flavorful from salads to cooking.
Cooking tip: slit from top to bottom and wash thoroughly with root facing up to remove all of the dirt trapped between the leaf layers.
-How to use: white and lower part of greens can be cooked whole, chopped in slices and substituted for onions; delicious raw in salads or cooked in soups, quiches, casseroles, stews, stocks, or stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed for 2 weeks in plastic bag.

PEA SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive ¼ pound of pea shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market year round or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

POTATOES:  You will receive Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).  You will receive these “old buddies” potatoes that have been over-wintered in our timber frame root cellar; possibly slightly less firm than a new potato, but good for cooking in any way suggested below.  
-How to use: good baked, boiled, roasted or in potato salads
-How to store: keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag; ideal temperature is 38-40 degrees with 80-90 percent humidity; a basement or very cool closet will work. 

SPINACH:  crisp, dark green leaf; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron and a plethora of other nutrients and antioxidants. The appearance of spinach also marks the beginning of spring for many of us farmers/gardeners!
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. MASKS & GLOVES- We recommend that all come to each distribution site with a mask and gloves to pick up your shares.  We will have hand sanitizer at some sites as well.  Please let our volunteers know if you need help.

2. ANY CHANGES in your address, phone, e-mail, or of misspelled names on any mailings or Pick Up Lists at Distribution Sites?  Are we missing your share partner’s name? Please let us know as soon as possible.

3. PAYMENTS DUE:  If you still owe money, you will see it in the Balance Due column on the Pick up Sheet.  Please let us know if you think there is a mistake.   Please finalize payments as soon as possible during the month of June.

4. IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA:  As some of you know we started a collaborative CSA with several local farms and food businesses about 11 weeks ago that you can opt in or out of each week called the Immune Booster.  If you are interested in supplementing your share with more veggies and other locally produced and sourced value-added products, please go to our website to sign up every Sunday night – Wednesday night.  Pick up is from 9 AM to 12 PM every Saturday at the Washtenaw Food Hub:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/how-does-our-immune-booster-csa-work/.  Still time to sign up this week!

5. FARMERS MARKETS:  We will have market tables set up at the Ann Arbor Market for onsite sales on Wednesdays and Saturdays, so please feel free to purchase other items to supplement your share.  The Chelsea Farmers Market is only curbside pick up at this time, so no onsite market sales for several weeks.  Notice the shortened window for Chelsea Market members to pick up their CSA boxes below.

6. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:  If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season, try using the Membership Actions section on the registration page to schedule Vacations or Pick up Location Changes.  Some sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited” (see below). Please always email ahead to see if the limited sites are at capacity before making any switches on your own to those spaces.

**Volunteers will be at each site during designated times below, so if you need to come at a different time, please feel free to bring gloves and your own pen to check off your name.
*Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)—7 AM to 12 PM (TANTRE STAFF there from 7-9 AM)
*MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM (SARA there the whole time)
*Farm (Wed.)—10 AM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF checking off names from 10 AM-12 PM and from 2-4 PM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 PM to 8 PM (LIZZIE there the whole time)
*Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) —10 AM to 5 PM (JESSICA there from 11 AM – 1 PM)
*Farm (Fri.)—2 PM to 7 PM (TANTRE STAFF there from 2 to  4 PM)
*Community High School (Sat.) —7 AM to 12 PM (SHANNON there from 7 -10 AM)
*Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 AM to 12 PM (PETER & RYAN there the whole time)
*Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)—10:30 AM to 12:30 PM (DEB there the whole time)
*Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)—12 PM to 3 PM (ARGUS STAFF there the whole time)
*RoosRoast-Rosewood (Sat)–9 AM  to 11 AM (JONATHON there the whole time)

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
by Richard and Deb
The climate really influences what comes out of the ground.  We had record cold the beginning of May with eight hours of severe freezing temperatures on the tender fruit blossoms and  baby kale and broccoli during a critical growing time for our early spring plants. The hardy perennial herb garden got hit as well, and though the oregano, fennel, and lemon balm pulled through, many burnt brush marks covered their first spring leaves. The peas survived and sprouted and now their lacy rows spread across the little hills and valleys alongside the asparagus that is sprouting quickly in the now near 90 degree heat these days.  Then several large storms of fresh water washed through, super-saturating the earth bringing forth the abundant buds and flowers on the trees, vines, and bramble canes into full bloom.  The strawberries, which many hands have weeded for many days and weeks, are being made ready for our early June celebration of vegetative diversity. The fungi and mushrooms of the woods emerge out of the dormant and reposing tree trunks that are stacked in layers on the forest floor.  
From this we are feeling hopeful for life to begin again, both in the realm of the farm and the realm of the wild things that continue their wild ways of the earth, the air, and the water.  Unfolding from the cold fly the many pollinators, the bees, the birds, the sandhill cranes, followed by foraging deer and nibbling bunnies of the buds and grasses in the early morning dew bringing back a belly full of greens to their burrows to feed their new babies.  In other words we have had a very dynamic spring.  
The dead and dying give rebirth to the new annual cycle.  The dead and diseased canes of the raspberries are snipped away every year to make room for the new sprouts that come from the roots that produce the fruits for this year’s sweet and eternal delight.  We can look to our roots to find our own renewal.  We can look to the passing away and decomposition of the previous season’s growth to the enrichment and renewal of this season. As farmers we try to promote and allow that process to continue unhindered.  
And so, we are really looking forward to coming unhindered to this season’s markets to share the abundant harvest with you.  Thank you for joining the CSA and for the overwhelming support and the amazing response to the CSA share this season.  We also appreciate our farm crew for weathering every storm and temperature fluctuation from 20 degree mornings to 80 degree days during these past few months.  They have been steadily plucking weeds, harvesting vegetables, and packing your shares. It is this time like no other that we may realize the strength and sustainability of supporting our local farmers and our local community.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipe” after it, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!  Lots and lots of ideas!

POTATO, LEEK, AND CABBAGE SOUP (https://www.food.com/recipe/potato-leek-cabbage-soup-507019)  Serves 6.
4 cups  chicken broth
3 potatoes, peeled & diced 
1 1/2 cups chopped cabbage
1 leek, diced, can include the green part for color 
1 onion, chopped 
2 carrots, peeled & chopped 
1 teaspoon  salt
1 teaspoon  black pepper
1/2 teaspoon  caraway seed
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup  sour cream
1 lb  bacon, cooked & crumbled or 1 lb Polish sausage, diced 
Combine chicken broth, potatoes, cabbage, leek, onion & carrots in a 4 qt slow cooker. If you are using polish sausage, also add at this time.  Stir in salt, pepper, caraway seeds & bay leaf.  Cover & cook on low 8-10 hours or 4-5 hours on high. Remove & discard bay leaf.  Combine some liquid from slow cooker with sour cream in a small bowl.  Add mixture to slow cooker; stir.  If using bacon instead of polish sausage, stir in bacon.

BASIC ASPARAGUS RECIPE:
Simple preparation: place in a tall, covered pot with an inch of water.  Stand asparagus upright and steam for 5 minutes.  This cooks the tougher stalks, while lightly steaming the thinner tops.  Feel free to add the following toppings:  brushed with lemon juice, brushed with olive oil or butter and tossed with sesame seeds.

Immune Booster Week 14, June 20, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 14) SHARE
June 20, 2020  

If needed, please contact Ryan Poe or Peter Ways at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: immuneboosterbytantre@gmail.com phone: Ryan: 949-232-2800 or Peter: 734-216-1795 website: www.tantrefarm.com

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” SHARE!

Hello fellow Locavores,

This Friday we close out spring for 2020 in the Northern Hemisphere and gladly welcome our Summer Solstice.  As the sun reaches its highest arc across our northern skies here in Michigan this Saturday, the crops are feeling the energy as we celebrate the light, life and potential for an exceptional harvest. This is a fantastic time of the year when bushel upon bushel of produce weighs down the vines, crates of strawberries get stacked high, potatoes and tomatoes are on the horizon and the garlic will be pulled from the earth and begin drying in the barn rafters. Tubers of every shape and color begin to bulb up and peas by the bucketful fill our walk-in refrigerators. The acceleration of all crops racing towards maturity is a very exciting and sometimes frantic time of the year for us farmers. The abundance of crops during these longest days of the year are magical to those of us who share this labor of love called farming. It’s a time when we go from steady picking to full on supersonic speed harvesting! We hope you get out and enjoy the longest day of the year too. Soak up the goodness of the sun, marvel in our planet’s beauty and reflect on how this all became.

****Pick up is 9am to 12pm this Saturday, June 20th at the Washtenaw Food Hub – 4175 Whitmore Lake Road, Ann Arbor MI 48105***

Without further ado, let’s get this week’s Immune Booster share laid out before you…

Leading the Tantre produce line-up, we have Kale. High in vitamins A and C, kale has the highest protein content of all cultivated vegetables. It has a sweet, mild, cabbage flavor and is interchangeable with broccoli, mustard greens and other hearty greens in any recipe. It can be used in salads, soups and stir-fries. Maybe get creative and try your hand at making kale chips! 

Second in line, Kohlrabi is making an appearance. A delicious purple or white bulbous globe that typically ranges from golf ball to tennis ball size, kohlrabi is a member of the cabbage family. An excellent source of vitamin C, potassium and fiber, kohlrabi is great for your digestive health. To consume this beauty, peel off the skin with a paring knife to reveal the crisp, apple-white flesh beneath. Some people enjoy eating them raw, like an apple. My favorite way to eat kohlrabi is similar to a fried potato; peel and cut the bulb into quarter inch thick slices, pan fry in olive oil and garlic cloves and serve with a side of whole grain mustard, soooo tasty!!!

Next on the menu, delicious and tender Garlic Scapes! Aside from the well-known garlic bulb, we can also eat the garlic’s flower – a.k.a. the scape. Slender green stems, often curled, with a slight bulge at the bottom where the flower would blossom, garlic scapes have a milder flavor than mature garlic. Delicious chopped into salads, roasted, sautéed, incorporated into soups and my personal favorite, quiche! Garlic scapes boast many of the nutritional benefits of garlic cloves, including high antioxidants to boost immunity, decrease inflammation and protect against heart disease.

Moving on, nothing beats the heat like a fresh, crisp and refreshing summer salad courtesy of Tantre’s head of Lettuce. This week’s box has an assortment of other veggies to complement these beautiful lettuce greens, so load up your plate and give your body a healthy dose of wholesome plants to energize and rejuvenate.

Red Radish globes feature next, and are the perfect match for the above-mentioned crispy lettuce salad. Extremely popular in the U.S., we Americans consume 400 million pounds of radishes every year! They are also tasty seasoned and roasted in a pan with other roasting veggies, steamed or – my personal favorite – pickled in a sweet vinaigrette. A pickled radish thinly sliced on a sandwich adds a little crunch and a little kick that shifts the culinary experience from ordinary to extraordinary! 

Rounding out Tantre’s produce list for this week, we have delectable Snap Peas. Super green pods lined with sweet peas that are sure to please, my kids can eat these by the bushel with ease! Notice how the edible pods’ shape resembles the smile on your face when you crack it open and devour the tasty little morsels inside. Snack away – they are amazingly nutritious, full of vitamins, iron, fiber, antioxidants and protein. If they make it past snack time, they can also be eaten briefly cooked – steamed, blanched, stir-fried or sautéed. Only 5 percent of the peas grown are sold fresh, which means our Tantre peas picked off the vine and immediately placed into your share box are an absolute rarity. Enjoy!
http://www.tantrefarm.com/

Not quite a micro green, not quite a macro green, but somewhere in-between, the Pea Shoots from Garden Works Organic Farm are nutrient dense with chemoprotective agents such as folate, carotene and antioxidants that help the body fight free radical and DNA damage. They are crisp and full of flavor, perfect for topping a salad, sprinkled on an omelet or tossed on top of any pasta dish. 
https://www.localharvest.org/garden-works-M5602

With tastes of Italy permeating our prepared dishes this week, we decided the rustic simplicity of Raterman Bread’s Original Sourdough Loaf would fit the bill nicely. Infused with the toasty flavor of white sesame seeds, especially after it has had two full days to ferment and rise in wild collected yeast.  Marrying the flavors through this process delivers a top-notch loaf that goes hand-in-hand with the food that follows.
https://www.facebook.com/RatermanBread/

Traditionally an Italian meat dish, Magdiale and his dedicated team at Harvest Kitchen have put their plant-based stamp on this Vegetable Carpaccio, Oregano Oil & Collard ‘Linguini’ with Sun-dried Tomato Pesto. The carpaccio is composed of thinly sliced hakurei turnips and heirloom radishes. This dish offers a fusion of layered flavors and is a perfect cool and crisp dish to beat the summer heat. It is also vegan, gluten-free and nut-free.
https://harvest-kitchen.com/

No need for words this week to describe Ginger Deli’s Grilled Tantre Vegetables & Savory Marinara dish. This sketch from owner and head chef, Te Phan, says it all. (NOTE: If the sketch does not appear here or as an attachment, here are the ingredients: MARINARA SAUCE – crushed tomatoes, red onion, garlic, black pepper, sea salt, basil, white wine, maple syrup, olive oil. GRILLED VEGETABLES: broccolini, swiss chard, spinach, cherry tomatoes.)
http://www.gingerdeli.com/

In keeping with our Italian spin this week, we decided that nothing speaks Italian like Mozzarella Cheese This beautiful mozzarella is freshly crafted from cow’s milk curd and expertly hand-stretched into balls by the cheesemakers at Zingerman’s Creamery. Mozzarella is perfect with a ripe, juicy tomato, in a caprese salad, on sandwiches or pizza, and perhaps served with this week’s prepared dishes by Harvest Kitchen and Ginger Deli… Delizioso!
https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/

Nothing celebrates the beginning of summer like fresh-picked, sun-drenched strawberries that are loaded with natural sugars from the sun’s heat. When witnessing the abundance of fruit at the u-pick farms, we all feel a hankering to make jams, jellies, strawberry shortcake, smoothies, tarts and pastries. This week Keegan and crew at the Lakehouse Bakery have whipped up a Strawberry Ginger Sour Cream Cake that pairs perfectly with a cup of tea or coffee to finish off your tour of Italy. 
https://www.thelakehousebakery.com/

A final bonus sweet treat originally absent from our preview email – Strawberries. With our fields blooming full of red juicy summer hearts at Tantre Farm, we just had to share the delight with you. Enjoy!

Here’s a link to Tantre’s treasure trove of recipes, where you can get some additional ideas for using this week’s share:http://tantrerecipes.blogspot.com

We look forward to seeing you all on Saturday, June 20th from 9am to 12pm at the Washtenaw Food Hub, 4175 Whitmore Lake Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48105.

Don’t forget to keep an eye out for Sunday night’s email regarding Tantre Farm’s Immune Booster CSA Share, Week 15.

All the best,

Ryan Poe and the Tantre Farm Team