2017: Week 20, October 8-14

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #20
Oct. 8-14, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS: round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and medium-tall, red-veined green leaves; keep in mind the greens can be substituted for Swiss chard or spinach in many recipes. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CAULIFLOWER (Amazing): medium-sized, white heads with domed, solid curds.
-How to use: raw for salads and dips, steamed, sauteed, or roasted.
-How to store: sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks or wrap in slightly dampened cloth and store in refrigerator.
You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 4 options:
–Rosemary—pine needle-like leaves used with potatoes, bread doughs, risottos, mixed vegetables, and meat dishes, as well as in sweet dishes such as lemonade, creams, custards, and syrups.
–Marjoram–a small and oval-shaped leaf, which is light green with a grayish tint. When fresh it is spicy, bitter, and slightly pungent with camphor-like notes, so often added to fish sauces, salad dressings, tomato-based sauces; goes well with vegetables including cabbages, potatoes, eggplant, and beans.
–Curly Parsley—curly, dark green leaves, often used as a garnish, but can be used interchangeably with flat-leaf parsley; has a strong parsley/celery flavor; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces.
–Black-stemmed Peppermint–superior fragrance and flavor; forest green leaves with deep purple veins and stems; leaves are good as a hot or iced tea, and adds a delicious flavor when minced and added to cooked peas, carrots, potatoes, and salads.

KALE (Green Curly): well ruffled green leaves; great for kale chips, in a salad, roasted, and in soups. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor. Our red onions have started getting soft spots in the center stem, so they are not storing well; just pop out that segment and chop up the rest of the onion. Very easy to freeze: just chop onion and put in freezer bags) and Cippolini (a traditional Italian onion known for its flat, oval shape and delicately mild, sweet flavor; ranges in size from 1-3 inches; used for pickling and to season a wide variety of dishes and especially good grilled on a skewer). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET PEPPERS: You will receive Green Bell Peppers (large blocky cells with fruity, sweet flavor) and Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe). See Week 13 for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES: You will receive Dakota Red (red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying) and Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is good for baking or frying). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BABY RAPINI: also called “Broccoli Raab” or Rabe or Rape; leafy green with 6- to 9-inch stalks and scattered clusters of tiny broccoli-like buds (most of ours don’t have buds yet, so just the leaf); traditional Italian specialty combining qualities of broccoli and mustard greens.
-How to use: used for salads or light cooking; to cook simply: clean rappini with water, oil pan, add garlic and brown. Add 1 cup of water. Put in rappini, season to taste. (Lemon may be used if desired.) Cover pan and steam for thirty minutes. Pepperoni or sausage may be added to rappini after it is fully cooked.
-How to store: wrap in dampened cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor and can be substituted for spinach in many recipes. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste) and San Marzano (early, large classic Italian Roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH & PIE PUMPKINS: Everyone will receive Sweet Dumpling (small 4-inch diameter, coloring is like the “Delicata”, but round, flat-topped shape; makes a great bowl for stuffing with rice, breading, or soups), Sunshine Kabocha (red-orange, flat-round fruit with dry, sweet, bright orange flesh; excellent for baking, mashing, and pies), and Baby Bear Pie Pumpkin (deep orange, 1 1/2-2 1/2-lb. fruits are about half the size of a normal pie pumpkin.) See Week 16 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. LAST WEEK OF THE SUMMER CSA: That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. BRING BAGS! Please bring bags (cloth for yourself and/or any “grocery-size” plastic and paper to share with others), a cooler, or a box to receive your produce this week, so you can leave the share box behind if we won’t see you again this fall.

3. STILL SPACES FOR THE “EXTENDED FALL CSA” SHARES: This 3-week share runs from Oct. 15 through Nov. 4 for $105 celebrating all the bounty of the fall vegetables! The link for online registration is http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com. Please sign up by this Saturday, Oct. 14, so you won’t miss any of those 3 weeks of produce. Please go to our website for more information. We are prorating these shares as well, so if you need to miss a week of the Extended Fall CSA, just send us an email, and we will register you for the weeks you will receive a share. Hope to share more of this abundant fall harvest with you throughout October! Tell your friends and family!! Due to outside exposure of potentially cold-damaging temperatures in October, we will not have Fall Shares at the Chelsea Farmers Market or at MOVE, since we have no way to protect these shares, so please find alternate pick up locations.

4. THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATION on November 18 is OPEN! You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”. This share is a one time pick up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. This share will be available for pick up on the Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 AM to 12 PM, at Tantré Farm from 2-5 PM, and also in Plymouth at Pure Pastures from 9 AM to 7 PM.

5. INTERESTED IN JOINING OUR CSA IN 2018? All members may renew their registration just like usual with online registration. You will all receive a separate email informing you when registration opens. Summer CSA Shares will be available for $650 for 20 weeks from June through mid October in 2018.

6. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—tomatoes have DISCOUNTED PRICES: Members–$0.75/lb. Non members–$1/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES

FRESH MINT SALSA FOR GRILLED LAMB CHOPS (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC)
3 plum tomatoes, seeded and finely diced
1/2 cup finely diced red onion
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 tsp lemon juice
3-4 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
Salt and pepper, to taste
8 lamb loin chops (or pork tenderloin)
Combine all ingredients except lamb; chill 1 hour. Prepare charcoal or heat outdoor grill. Cook lamb chops to medium rare, 4-6 minutes per side. Top each serving (2 chops) with salsa; serve immediately.

BROCCOLI RABE WITH LEMON AND GARLIC (from cooks.com) Serves 4
1 1/2 lb broccoli rabe (rapini)

2 tsp minced garlic
3 Tbsp butter

2 Tbsp minced fresh parsley

2 tsp fresh grated lemon rind
In a heavy kettle cook the broccoli rabe covered in very little water until stems are tender. Saute garlic in butter over medium heat 3 minutes. Drain the broccoli rabe, toss with garlic mixture, parsley, salt and pepper. Garnish with lemon rind.

GINGER PEANUT SOUP (from How it all Vegan) Serves 4-6
1 1/2 cups broccoli, chopped
1 1/2 cups cauliflower, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1 Tbsp fresh ginger, grated
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
2 Tbsp olive oil
3 cups vegetable stock or water
1 (28 oz) can diced tomatoes or 4 chopped fresh
5 Tbsp natural peanut butter (or nut butter)
In a large soup pot, saute the broccoli, cauliflower, onions, ginger, garlic, cayenne, salt, and pepper in oil on medium heat until vegetables are tender. Add the stock, tomatoes, and nut butter. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

***Thank you for a wonderful Summer Season filled with gratitude, community building, and a bountiful harvest. We would especially like to express our heartfelt appreciation to our farm crew for all their hard work and long hours this past season. If you get a chance to thank them please do. Please feel free to contact us throughout the rest of fall and winter for any fall storage produce at the Farm or come visit us at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market every Wed. (until December) and Sat. (year round), Chelsea Farmers Market (every Sat. through Oct.), Argus Farm Stop on Liberty or on Packard, and the People’s Food Coop throughout the winter. Thank you for being a member of the Tantre Farm Summer CSA!! Hope to share our harvest with you again for our Fall/Winter 2017 CSA’s or the Summer 2018 CSA.
–Deb, Richard, and the Tantre Farm Crew

2017: Week 19, October 1-7

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #19
Oct. 1-7, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL (optional): ALL SHARES will receive basil this week. Some of the leaves have a few brown spots due to a recent frost, but some of you may still want to make pesto with the last of the basil this season. This is an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top.

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible side shoots; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CELERY: tall, crisp, glossy green stalks and leaves with a strong, celery flavor; contains vitamins A, C, B-complex, and E with some other minerals; also high in fiber and sodium. *Organic celery tends to be a darker green, since it’s unblanched like commercial celery. The darker green color indicates more minerals and vitamins, but also is a bit stronger, so you may want to use a little less than you normally would.
-How to use: typically eaten raw and used in salads; ribs and leaves can be added to casseroles, soups, stews, and stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; can be frozen in slices on a cookie sheet and then packed into freezer bags; celery leaves can be dehydrated and added to soups or stews.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

EGGPLANT: You will receive Nadia (slender, purplish-black, glossy-like, bell-shaped fruit), Rosa Biana (an Italian heirloom; round fruit streaked with white and violet), or Orient Express (dark purple Asian type with long, slender, glossy fruits, which are tender, delicately flavored, and quick cooking). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

KALE (Rainbow Lacinato): unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Cipollini (a traditional Italian onion known for its flat, oval shape and delicately mild, sweet flavor; ranges in size from 1-3 inches; used for pickling and to season a wide variety of dishes and especially good grilled on a skewer) and Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh). See Week 13 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES: You will receive Red Dakota (red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying) and Harvest Moon (velvety dark-purple skin and dark, golden-yellow flesh ; infused with creamy nutty flavor; excellent for mashing, baking, and boiling). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste). **Once again you will also receive a few large HEIRLOOM tomato varieties, such as Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) or Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful).
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH/PIE PUMPKIN: You will receive Delicata (small, oblong, creamy colored with long green stripes, only slightly ribbed; pale yellow, sweet flesh; edible skin) and Pie Pumpkin (bright orange skin with dry, sweet flesh).
-How to use: slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; boil or steam chunks for 15-20 minutes, or until tender (peel skins off “before” or “after“ cooked, but “after” is easiest when it’s cooled); mash cooked squash with butter; puree cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store: keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75 percent humidity; will also store at room temperature.
How to freeze: if you notice a squash is getting soft or a spot starts to rot, cook it immediately, scoop out the pulp, and freeze it in freezer bags for future use.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. CORRECTION: SAUERKRAUT WORKSHOP on SUNDAY, OCT. 8 from 12 to 2 PM: Join us for our 2nd annual sauerkraut workshop and get cultured with us at the Washtenaw Food Hub in learning to make your own sauerkraut using locally-grown, organic produce from Tantre Farm! Fermentation Expert, Melissa, will be leading this Farm-to-Fermentation workshop that will cover the basics of wild vegetable fermentation. Participants will take home a jar of fermenting sauerkraut made during the workshop. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

3. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—tomatoes have DISCOUNTED PRICES: Members–$0.75/lb. Non members–$1/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

4. GROCERY BAGS NEEDED!! We could use any extra paper or plastic grocery bags you may have accumulated for market and for CSA distribution sites. Please ONLY grocery bags!

5. EXTENDED FALL CSA SHARE REGISTRATION IS OPEN: This share runs from Oct. 15 through Nov. 4 for $105 celebrating all the bounty of the fall vegetables! There is plenty of room and plenty of produce this fall, so you will get in! The link for online registration is http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com, which will bring you right to the sign up page. Please sign up by Oct. 13, so you won’t miss any of the 3 weeks of produce. We will be sending a separate email notice soon, so that everyone knows more details about this share. You also can go to our website for more information. We are prorating these shares as well, so if you need to miss a week of the Extended Fall CSA, just send us an email, and we will register you for the weeks you will receive a share. Hope to share more of this abundant fall harvest with you throughout October!

6. THANKSGIVING CSA IS OPEN! This CSA is open as well for registration for pick up on Nov. 18. A more detailed email notice about this will come out to you sometime in the next few weeks. You can also read more details about the Thanksgiving Share on our website under “CSA Info”. This share is a one time pick up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. This share will be available for pick up on the Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 AM – 12 PM, Tantré Farm from 2-5 PM, or Pure Pastures from 9 AM – 7 PM.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipe” after it, and many recipe ideas will pop up. Have fun searching! Lots and lots of ideas!

AUTUMN MINESTRONE (Moosewood Restaurant Daily Special by the Moosewood Collective)
2 Tbs. vegetable oil
1 c. chopped onions
2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
2 1/2 c. peeled and cubed winter squash (such as delicata or butternut)
2 celery stalks, diced
1/2 c. peeled and diced carrots
2 1/2 c. cubed potatoes
1 tsp. dried oregano
2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper
6 c. water
4 c. chopped kale
1 1/2 c. cooked (or 15-oz. can) cannellini beans (or any cooked bean)
Warm the oil in a large soup pot on medium heat. Add the onions and garlic, and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the squash, celery, carrots, potatoes, oregano, salt, pepper, and water; cook for 10 minutes or until potatoes are almost done. Add the kale and beans (drained) and simmer for another 5 to 7 minutes, until the kale is tender and the beans are hot. Yields 12 cups. Serves 6 to 8.

CELERY SALAD WITH ROASTED PEPPERS AND MOZZARELLA (from Farmer John’s Cookbook by John Peterson) Serves 4-6
1 bunch celery
2 roasted red peppers, cut into strips
4 oz mozzarella cheese, cut into strips
2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil
6 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 small clove garlic, minced (about 1/2 tsp)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
3 eggs, hard-cooked, sliced
Combine the celery, roasted red peppers, mozzarella, and basil in a large bowl. Whisk together the oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Pour the dressing over the salad; toss to coat. Cover the bowl and chill for at least 2 hours. Toss again before serving. Arrange the egg slices decoratively around the salad.

SIMPLY PUMPKIN, ORANGE AND GINGER NECTAR Makes 2 servings, about 1 1/4 cups each
1/2 cup pureed (already baked) pie pumpkin

2 cups orange juice

1/2 to 1 tsp grated fresh ginger, or more to taste
Combine pumpkin, orange juice and ginger in small pitcher; stir until smooth. If not drinking right away, cover and refrigerate any remaining. This nectar is best when consumed within 2 days.

2017: Week 18, September 24-30

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #18
Sept. 24-30, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.
In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Hercules): sweet, orange, cone-shaped roots; good eating quality and stores well. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: We are letting our smaller patches of herbs recuperate for a week, so everyone will receive just basil this week.
*Genovese Basil—ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top.

KALE (Lacinato): dark green, noncurled, blistered leaves, but heavily savoyed. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

RADISHES: you will receive Pink Beauty (pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor). See Week 17 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf, good source of vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste). **Once again you will also receive a few large HEIRLOOM tomato varieties, such as Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) or Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful).
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive New Orchid (sweet, bright orange flesh with sherbet-like taste and skin has dark green contrast stripes; oval round, medium large “icebox” size; similar to “Sunshine” in appearance, but larger). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. SAUERKRAUT WORKSHOP on SATURDAY, OCT. 8 from 12 to 2 PM: Join us for our 2nd annual sauerkraut workshop and get cultured with us at the Washtenaw Food Hub in learning to make your own sauerkraut using locally-grown, organic produce from Tantre Farm! Fermentation Expert, Melissa, will be leading this Farm-to-Fermentation workshop that will cover the basics of wild vegetable fermentation. Participants will take home a jar of fermenting sauerkraut made during the workshop. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

3. THANKS FOR COMING TO OUR FALL WORK PARTY AND POTLUCK on Sept. 24. We managed to clean about 34 crates of garlic, weeded several herbs beds in the herb garden, and harvested some Roma tomatoes and a pile of pumpkins after our wagon ride. Throughout the day we filled our bellies full of delicious food and enjoyed the trills and jangles of Jen and Eric, our local musicians. All members were able to go home with a squash or a pumpkin, a pint of raspberries, and a flower bouquet if they wanted. We really appreciate getting to know so many of our Tantre Farm community and especially all the ways you all pitched in to help the farm!

4. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.

**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.

**U-PICK Tomatoes—tomatoes have DISCOUNTED PRICES: Members–$0.75/lb. Non members–$1/lb.

**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

5. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!! We still could use the extra hands in getting some major weeding done. Please contact us.

6. EXTENDED FALL CSA AND THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATIONS! In the next few days, Sign Up links will open, so please look up details on our website. You will receive a separate email announcing when registration is open.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES

BROCCOLI, RED PEPPER, AND CHEDDAR CHOWDER (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
1 head broccoli
6 oz sharp Cheddar, coarsely grated (1 1/2 cups)
1 large boiling potato
1 red pepper, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tsp ground cumin
2 Tbsp minced fresh thyme
1 tsp salt 1 large onion, chopped
1/4 tsp black pepper
2 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp dry mustard
3/4 cup heavy cream

Discard tough lower third of broccoli stem. Peel remaining stem and finely chop. Cut remaining broccoli into very small (1-inch) florets. Cook florets in a large pot of boiling salted water until just tender, 2-3 minutes. Transfer with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking, then drain. Reserve 3 cups cooking water for chowder. Peel potato and cut into 1/2-inch cubes. Cook potato, onion, bell pepper, broccoli stems, thyme and garlic in butter in a 3- to 4-quart heavy pot over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until onion is softened, 8-10 minutes. Add cumin, salt, pepper, and mustard and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add flour and cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Add reserved cooking water and simmer (partially covered), stirring occasionally, until potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in cream and cheese and cook, stirring, until cheese is melted, then season with salt and pepper. Puree about 2 cups of chowder in a blender until smooth (use caution when blending hot liquids) and return to pot. Add florets and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 2 minutes.

BASIL PESTO VEGAN (from What Do You Do With This Stuff?)
This is delicious!
2 cup basil leaves
2 cup tomatoes, chopped
2 garlic cloves, pressed
2 Tbsp toasted pine nuts
1 tsp salt
Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.

GARLIC-BASIL CORN ON THE COB
Combine 2 tablespoons butter (softened), 1 tablespoon basil, and 1 garlic clove (minced) in a small bowl. Place 4 ears of corn into a large saucepan of boiling water; cook 4 minutes. Drain. Spoon 1 teaspoon butter mixture over each ear of corn.

KALE GRATIN AND BASMATI RICE (from Mad Mares Cookbook)
2 cups vegetable stock
1 cup diced red pepper
1 cup corn kernels
1 1/4 cups uncooked basmati rice
1 tsp dried thyme
4 lbs kale or other greens (mustard, turnip, collards)
1 1/4 cups skimmed ricotta
2/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 tsp salt
Fresh ground pepper, to taste
1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs
Olive oil spray

Combine stock, pepper, corn, rice, and thyme in saucepan. Bring to boil. Cover and simmer on low until rice is tender, about 15 minutes. Set aside. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wash greens and remove stems. Cover and cook in large pot over medium heat until greens wilt, about 5 minutes. (Water on leaves should be enough.) Drain and coarsely chop. Fluff rice. In large bowl, combine greens, rice mixture, ricotta, half of the Parmesan, salt, and pepper. Place in oiled, 2-quart gratin dish. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan and bread crumbs and spray well with oil. Bake 30 minutes until golden.

BOWTIES WITH BASIL, CILANTRO, SPINACH AND GOAT CHEESE SAUCE (from www.epicurean.com) Serves 4

1 lb bowtie pasta

1 cup lightly packed basil leaves

3/4 cup packed cilantro or mint leaves

1/2 cup steamed fresh spinach, well drained

1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

2 Tbsp butter, softened

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1 1/4 tsp sea salt

1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

6-8 ounces goat cheese

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil and cook the pasta to your liking. While the pasta is cooking, combine the basil, cilantro, spinach, Parmesan, butter, garlic, salt and pepper in a food processor and process until smooth. Add the goat cheese and pulse until well mixed with the other ingredients. When the pasta is cooked, drain, but reserve 1-2 tablespoons of the cooking water. Combine the hot pasta with the processed ingredients and the cooking water in a large bowl. Mix until the pasta is coated well. Serve and make sure you have salt and pepper on the table to season to taste.

2017: Week 17, September 17-23

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #17
Sept. 17-23, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks or wrap in slightly dampened cloth and store in refrigerator.
*Parsley: ALL SHARES will receive either “Italian Flat Leaf” or “Curly” this week. Both varieties are interchangeable in recipes. Dark green leaves with a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces. see other “Parsley” recipes in A to Z Cookbook.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

MUSHROOMS (Oyster): white, golden, or gray oyster-shaped cap with a mild, anise, earthy odor. If you don’t care for mushrooms, then leave them for someone else or gift them to a friend!
-How to use: brush off dirt to clean or wipe with damp cloth, do not wash or submerge in water; good grilled, sauteed, steamed, in soups, and in sandwiches.
-How to store: place in paper bag or wax bag and keep in refrigerator for up to 5-7 days.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried) or Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

RADISHES: you will receive Pink Beauty (pink-colored root with mild, spicy flavor).
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens are delicious in soups or stir-fries; excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s!
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf– best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced.
See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste), Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Nova (beautiful, bright orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent, sweet flavor), or Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor). **Once again you will also receive a few large HEIRLOOM tomato varieties, such as Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) or Rose (deep pink, heirloom, medium-sized tomato, which is meaty and flavorful) or Striped German (very large, meaty, 1-2 lb fruit with red-yellow stripes and dense, juicy, red-yellow streaked flesh; excellent sweet, complex flavors; a Mennonite family heirloom from the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia). Our feature article is about Heirlooms, so you can know how special they are. We pick heirloom tomatoes slightly green sometimes to prevent splitting and damage, while transporting. Heirlooms are softer and more perishable when ripe, but the flavor of each is very memorable. Best to store upside down at room temperature until completely ripe. Very easy to can, freeze, and dehydrate for tomato flavors all season long!
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Dark Belle (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor) or New Orchid (sweet, bright orange flesh with sherbet-like taste and skin has dark green contrast stripes; oval round, medium large “icebox” size; similar to “Sunshine” in appearance, but larger). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be this coming Sunday, Sept. 24, between 1-4 P.M. Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass. Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost. You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home with them, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash and a flower bouquet. Hope to see you join us!

3. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—many tomato varieties are ready for picking. Members–$1.00/lb. Non members–$1.50/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1.25/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

4. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!! We still could use the extra hands in getting some major weeding done. Please contact us.

5. EXTENDED FALL CSA AND THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATION ARE COMING SOON! In the next few weeks, Sign Up links will open, so please look up details on our website. You will receive a separate email announcing when registration is open.

6. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

WHAT’S AN HEIRLOOM?
(by Joel Heeres, “Tantré alumnus“)

It’s not a loom for your heirs, as you might think. Heirloom fruit and vegetable varieties are hundreds and sometimes thousands of years old. Heirlooms differ in shape, color, size, flavor, and storability, but they all share one characteristic– their seeds can be saved one season to plant in the next. Heirloom varieties have been bred by local farmers and gardeners over many generations and have been established as stable varieties that grow “true to seed“. These varieties are special, because they have been adapted to certain climates over a long time.

Heirloom vegetables are often more flavorful than hybrid vegetables. Hybrids are bred for high productivity, disease and pest resistance, drought resistance, and hardiness. While these traits are undeniably helpful, they often come at the cost of flavor. In addition, farmers cannot save seed from hybrid crops, as they are unstable crosses from two different varieties.

In summary, heirloom crops are beneficial to small farmers and home gardeners, because their seeds can be saved to plant again. They have better flavor and are more unique than hybrids, although they can be less hardy and prone to diseases.

At Tantré Farm, we grow both hybrid and heirloom crops. Some of the crops we grow from heirloom seeds are tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, winter squash, potatoes, onions, kale, beans, turnips, and radishes. Sometimes we will have some varieties of heirlooms only on the market tables, since we may not have a lot of them available. We’ll try to let you know when you are getting heirloom produce in your share box.

RECIPES

SWEET ONION AND WATERMELON SALSA (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure)
2 cups chopped watermelon, seeded
3/4 cup sweet onion
3/4 cup black beans, rinsed and drained
1/4 cup chopped seeded jalapeno chilies
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 Tbsp brown sugar
1/2 tsp salt

Mix watermelon, onion, beans, chilies, cilantro, brown sugar, and salt in a bowl. Refrigerate covered for 1 hour to blend flavors. Stir and serve as dip, condiment, or salad.

ITALIAN PARSLEY AND ARUGULA SALAD WITH MUSHROOMS

1 cup parsley leaves, loosely packed, washed, spun dry

1 cup arugula, loosely packed, washed, spun dry

3 firm white cultivated mushrooms; sliced thin

Dash salt

1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1/4 cup thinly-sliced red onions, soaked in ice water 15 minutes, drained

Parmesan cheese, shaved in thin curls

In a large bowl toss the parsley, arugula and mushrooms with the salt. Add the oil and toss well. Add the lemon juice and toss well. Season to taste with the black pepper. Divide the salad among plates and add to each portion some of the onions and Parmesan curls.

BROILED MUSHROOMS (from www.recipes.wikia.com) Serves 2-3
1 lb fresh oyster mushrooms, stems removed
6 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
4 garlic cloves, finely minced
4 Tbsp parsley, coarsely chopped
2 Tbsp olive oil
Salt and black pepper, to taste

Preheat the broiler. Clean the mushroom caps with a damp paper towel. Save the stems for stock or to flavor sauces. In a small bowl, combine 4 tablespoons of the lemon juice, the garlic, 3 tablespoons of the parsley, and the oil and pepper. Mix well. Line a 17×11-inch jelly roll pan with foil. Arrange the mushrooms, top side up, on the foil, and brush generously with the lemon juice mixture. Place the mushrooms 4-inches from the heat and broil until just tender, 5-7 minutes. To serve, sprinkle the mushrooms with the remaining 2 tablespoons lemon juice, 1 tablespoon of parsley, salt and pepper to taste.

2017: Week 16, September 10-16

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #16
Sept. 10-16, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL: ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks or wrap in slightly dampened cloth and store in refrigerator.
You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 4 options:
-French Sorrel–slightly tart, lemon-flavored green; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces; can be used in omelets, breads, or cooked as a side dish; leaves are shaped like spinach, but paler green in color; high in vitamin A and contains some calcium.
-Marjoram–a small and oval-shaped leaf, which is light green with a greyish tint. When fresh it is spicy, bitter, and slightly pungent with camphorlike notes, so often added to fish sauces, salads and dressings, tomato-based sauces, grilled lamb and other meats; goes well with vegetables including cabbages, potatoes, eggplant, and beans. It is usually added at the end of cooking to retain its delicate flavor or as a garnish. Traditionally, it was used in tea to cure headaches, head colds, calm nervous disorders, and to clear sinuses.
-Rosemary– With a spicy, pungent, pine flavor, rosemary is one of the most potent herbs available; good in stews, braises, and roasts of vegetables or meat.
-Curly Parsley—dark green leaves with a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces.

KALE: You will receive Red Russian Kale (the stems are purple, and leaves are deep gray-green, purple-veined, flat, non-curled, and tooth-edged.) See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe) or Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf– best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced.
See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Nova (beautiful orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent sweet flavor; firm and meaty), Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste), Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Nova (beautiful, bright orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent, sweet flavor), or Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor). Very easy to can, freeze, and dehydrate for tomato flavors all season long!
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WINTER SQUASH: Everyone will receive Spaghetti Squash (3-5-pounds, pale yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size, only mildly sweet with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh).
-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet).
-How to store: Keep for several months (depending on the variety) in a dry, moderately warm (50-60 degrees), but not freezing location with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ENDING SUMMER CSA DATES: The end is drawing near. This is just a reminder that our summer shares are ending in just a few weeks. That means Oct. 11 (Wed.), Oct. 13 (Fri.), and Oct. 14 (Sat.) are the last distribution days for our Summer Shares.

2. “FARM TO TABLE” TROLLEY TOUR on SEPT. 17: This coming Sunday there is still room to join the Agrarian Adventure’s Trolley Tour. Each stop will feature a different chef and a different farm and include a short tour. Specialty cocktails (nonalcoholic, as well as, alcoholic options) will be available with our guest bartender Jude Walser from the Alley Bar.
*Cheese or Yogurt Appetizers at Fluffy Bottom Farms’s with Chef Chris Huey (Mediterrano)
*Roasted Pork, Vegetarian Succotash, Mashed Potatoes, Braised Greens, and a Salad at Tantre Farm with Chef Chris Chiapelli (Ross School of Business, Black Pearl)
*Apple Dessert at Albers Orchard with Chef James Raynak (Robin Hills Farm)
**The Agrarian Adventure is a local non profit that provides Farm to School experiences and supports local School Gardens, and Deb has served on the board for the past 7 years. This “progressive dinner” is a fundraiser to help continue to enrich students’ connections to the foods they eat, their personal health, and through the local community around them. For ticketing and more information visit: agrarianadventure.org.

3. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be Sunday, Sept. 24, between 1-4 P.M. Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass. Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost. You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, listen to music, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home with them, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash and a flower bouquet.

4. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-PICK Flowers– You may pick 1 bouquet of up to 15 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Please feel free to bring clippers and a vase to take it home. Optional donations of $1 or $2 will help to pay for some seed and labor costs. Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**U-PICK Tomatoes—many tomato varieties are ready for picking. Members–$1.00/lb. Non members–$1.50/lb.
**ALREADY PICKED Tomatoes – $1.25/lb. Members. Discounted half bushel boxes of Romas at the farm & market for $25.

5. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!! We still could use the extra hands in getting some major weeding done. Please contact us.

6. EXTENDED FALL CSA AND THANKSGIVING CSA REGISTRATION ARE COMING SOON! In the next few weeks, Sign Up links will open, so please look up details on our website. You will receive a separate email announcing when registration is open.

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES
SPICY CORN KERNEL “PAN” CAKE (From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce, MACSAC) Serves 4.
2 Tbs. vegetable oil
3 heaping c. fresh corn kernels (cut from 6-8 ears)
2 Tbs. minced fresh basil, cilantro, or parsley
2 Tbs. minced onion
1-2 Tbs. minced jalapeño pepper
3 Tbs. cornmeal
3 Tbs. flour
salt & freshly ground black pepper to taste
Garnish: fresh basil, cilantro or parsley
freshly made or bottled salsa

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Measure oil into a heavy, ovenproof, medium-sized skillet (cast-iron is best) and heat pan in oven for 30 minutes. Combine remaining ingredients except the last two in a bowl, then press evenly into hot pan. (Don’t stir corn in the pan, or the crust won’t form properly.) Bake 25-30 minutes, until edges are brown and crispy. Run a spatula around the outer rim and underneath the corn cake to loosen it from the pan. Wearing hot pads, place a heat-proof serving plate face down over the pan and invert pan so the cake drops onto plate. Garnish with fresh herbs and serve with salsa. Gluten free!

SPAGHETTI SQUASH CASSEROLE (from Moosewood Cookbook) Serves 4-6
1 spaghetti squash, 8-inches long
2 Tbsp butter
1 cup chopped onion
2 medium cloves garlic, minced
1/2 lb fresh, sliced mushrooms
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp dried basil or 1 tablespoon fresh basil, minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
1 cup cottage or ricotta cheese
1 cup grated mozzarella cheese
1 cup fine bread crumbs
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Halve the squash and scoop out seeds. Bake face-down on oiled sheet until it is easily pierced by a fork, about 30 minutes. Let stand until cool enough to touch, then scoop out pulp and place in large bowl. Meanwhile, heat butter and saute onions, garlic, and mushrooms with herbs, salt and pepper. When onions are soft, add tomatoes and continue to cook until most of the liquid evaporates. Stir this mixture into squash pulp with remaining ingredients except Parmesan. Spread into buttered 2-quart casserole. Top with Parmesan. Bake uncovered for 30-40 minutes.

ROSEMARY LEMONADE (from Farmer John’s Cookbook by John Peterson) Serves 2-4
4 cups water
6 sprigs (each about 5-inches long) fresh rosemary
3/4 cup sugar (or more, to taste)
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 3 large lemons)

Bring the water to a boil in a medium pot, and then reduce the heat so that the water barely simmers. Add the rosemary sprigs; cover and steep the rosemary for 45 minutes. Remove the pot from heat and remove the rosemary sprigs. (If necessary, strain the mixture to remove loose leaves.) Add the sugar; stir until dissolved. Set aside to cool. Put the lemon juice into a large plastic or glass container and add the cooled rosemary syrup; stir until well combined. Taste the lemonade and sweeten it with additional sugar if desired. Refrigerate until cold. For an extra summery kick, garnish each serving with a sprig of fresh basil, lemon balm or mint.

2017: Week 15, September 3-9

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #15
Sept. 3-9, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL: ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NO HERBS this week: Due to a sudden shrinkage of our Tantre crew for various expected and unexpected reasons, we are too short-handed this week to harvest herbs besides Basil. If you would like a fresh herb bunch and you are at the farm and willing to pick it yourself, we could help you find it. IF ANYONE HAS TIME TO LEND A HAND WITH THE HARVEST OR WEEDING, WE SURE COULD USE THE EXTRA HELP FOR ANY AMOUNT OF TIME! Just email us, so we know what day you are coming. Our day starts around 7 AM with lunch at 12:30 PM (you would be fed!) and ends at 5 PM. Come for an hour or all day!

KALE (Green Curly): well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

KOHLRABI: delicious bulbous member of the cabbage family, that grows above ground; green skin and crisp, apple-white flesh tubers are good sources of vitamins C and A, [potassium, and calcium.
-How to use: good steamed and then mashed with potatoes, added to soups or stews, or delicious sliced and eaten raw with dip.
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to a month.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Carmen (6 inch long, tapered fruit that ripens from green to a deep “carmine” red; sweet taste in salads and when roasted and fully red-ripe).
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted!!
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is great for baking or frying). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Nova (beautiful orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent sweet flavor; firm and meaty), Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste) Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), or Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Nova (beautiful, bright orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent, sweet flavor), Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor), or Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads). You will also receive a few large Heirloom tomato varieties. We pick heirloom tomatoes slightly green sometimes to prevent splitting and damage, while transporting. Heirlooms are softer and more perishable when ripe, but the flavor of each is very memorable. Best to store upside down at room temperature until completely ripe. Very easy to can, freeze, and dehydrate for tomato flavors all season long!
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Little Baby Flower (small, 2-4 lb. round fruit; bright green stripe pattern on shell and dark pink flesh that is sweet and crisp with a high sugar count) or Sorbet Swirl (tasty sweet flesh has beautiful pastel swirls of red and yellow; average 10 pound fruits are round to oval with 8-inches diameter). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. TOMATO PRESERVING WORKSHOP at Tantre Farm: This workshop is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 10 from 1 to 4 PM. Former Tantre intern, Noelle Dronen, will teach mostly how to can tomatoes, but also some information will be on dehydrating and freezing them. There will be active participation and “take-home” samples for those attending. Plan on bringing a Quart Size Canning Jar. Please register with your Name, Phone Number, and E-mail Address in the body of the email to us. There will be a small $5 fee for materials. Bulk tomatoes will be available for you to buy. This is a great time for canning, freezing, or dehydrating!

2. FARM TO TABLE TROLLEY TOUR on SEPT. 17 from 4 to 9 PM: The Agrarian Adventure invites you to a trolley tour of three local farms and Tantre Farm is one of them! Each stop will feature a different chef and a different farm and include a short tour. Specialty cocktails will be available with our guest bartender Jude Walser from the Alley Bar.

*Appetizers at Fluffy Bottom Farms with Chef Chris Huey (Mediterrano)

*Entree & Salad at Tantre Farm with Chef Chris Chiapelli (Ross School of Business, Black Pearl)

*Dessert at Albers Orchard (chef to be announced soon)

The Agrarian Adventure is a local non profit that provides Farm to School experiences and supports local School Gardens, and Deb has served on the board for the past 7 years. This “progressive dinner” is a fundraiser to help continue to enrich students’ connections to the foods they eat, their personal health, and through the local community around them. For ticketing and more information visit: agrarianadventure.org.

3. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be Sunday, Sept. 24, between 1-4 P.M. Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass. Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost. You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, listen to music, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. All who come will be able to take something home with them, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash and a flower bouquet.

4. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-pick Flowers– Some of the flowers are ready in the u-pick flower garden. You may pick 1 bouquet up to 10 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Whenever possible if you can donate $1 or $2 that will help to pay for some seed and labor costs, since we don’t charge for “feeding the soul” bouquets! Extra bouquets will cost $4.
**–U-pick Tomatoes—many tomato varieties are ready for picking. Members–$1.00/lb. Non members–$1.50/lb.

5. PLASTIC OR PAPER GROCERY BAGS NEEDED, if you would like to donate some to the farm or at markets. We are running low.

6. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

IS AT AN APPLE? IS IT A JICUMA? NO, IT’S KOHLRABI!!
When is a root vegetable not a root vegetable? When it’s a small bulbous member of the cabbage family called kohlrabi, that’s when. For all intents and purposes, kohlrabi appears to be a root vegetable in the same company as turnips, radishes, and rutabagas. However, the bulbous shape of kohlrabi is caused by a swelling of the plant’s stem near the ground. In that sense, kohlrabi is more of a tightly packed version of its cousin, the cabbage. In fact, the name “kohlrabi” is derived from two German words: “kohl” meaning cabbage and “rabi” meaning turnip. It is not unusual to hear the term “turnip cabbage” to describe kohlrabi.

Despite its connections to cabbage and turnips, steamed or boiled kohlrabi is said to taste more like broccoli or Brussels sprouts. Indeed, kohlrabi is in the same general category, the Brassica oleracea Gongylodes group, as the broccoli it resembles in flavor. It can also be used in lieu of cabbage in many of the sausage and cabbage dishes favored in German cooking.

A raw kohlrabi can also be eaten like an apple, although it contains far less sugar. Some people find the taste of raw kohlrabi to be an acquired one, but many people who were raised in largely German communities in the Midwest grew up eating kohlrabi whenever it was in season. One town in Illinois even held annual festivals in honor of the Kohlrabi, so don’t be surprised if one of our small towns in Michigan decides we are due for a celebration of Kohlrabi.

RECIPES

KOHLRABI VEGETABLE STEW (from The Rolling Prairie Cookbook by Nancy O’Connor)
2-3 medium kohlrabi, bulbs and greens
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, cut in slivers
3 medium carrots, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
2 medium potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
1 cup peeled chopped tomatoes
4 cups vegetable broth
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp salt
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp molasses

Separate leaves from kohlrabi bulbs. Peel bulbs and cut into large chunks. De-rib leaves and cut into thin strips. Set aside. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onions and saute for several minutes. Add kohlrabi bulb chunks, carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, broth, bay leaf, oregano, salt, pepper, molasses and mustard. Turn up heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until veggies are not quite tender. Add kohlrabi leaves and simmer, uncovered for another 10 minutes, or until veggies are just cooked.

KALE AND KOHLRABI SALAD (http://canolaeatwell.com/recipe/kohlrabi-and-kale-slaw)
4 cups kale, chopped
1 kohlrabi bulb, peeled and julienned
1/2 cup shredded carrots
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup toasted pecans

Dressing
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
salt and pepper
Combine kale, kohlrabi, carrots, dried cranberries and pecans in a large bowl. In a small bowl whisk together red wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, honey, minced garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper. Mix dressing with salad until well coated. Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving.

2017: Week 14, August 27 – September 2

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #14
Aug. 27-Sept. 2, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL: ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.
A
CUCUMBERS or ZUCCHINI: You will receive Olympian (considered a slicing cucumber with dark green, straight 8-9 in. fruit; crisp with fresh flavor. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage information for cucumbers) or Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits and some with stripes. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage information for zucchinis).

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: There are about 150 different species of aromatic annual and perennial basils. This week members may choose 1 bunch ONLY from 4 varieties of Specialty Basil below. Each variety has unique flavors and colors to accent any meal. THE FLOWERS ARE EDIBLE and a wonderful garnish for drinks, salads, soups, pasta, and dessert, so be sure to jazz up any meal with a little creative flair:
*Aromatto Basil – sturdy purple stems, dark purple flowers, with purple-green bicolor foliage; scent is similar to Cinnamon Basil with a sweeter flavor than Genovese Basil; use with pasta, pesto, meats, salads, veggies, fruit desserts.
*Cinnamon Basil – small thin serrated green leaves with contrasting purple stems and purple-spiked flowers; savory element to raw dishes, soups, hot drinks, infused oils, and especially suited to fruit dishes. Excellent informational link for cinnamon basil: http://flipsidehip.com/cinnamon-basil-a-must-have-medicinal-herb/
*Lemon Basil—narrow, ovate, light green leaves producing a lemon scent & strong citrus flavor; use fresh or dried in vinegars, fish, chicken, vegetables and soups; common herb found within Thai, Indonesian and several Middle Eastern region cuisines. Excellent informational link for lemon basil: http://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Lemon_Basil_152.php
*Purple Opal Basil – rich, dark purple colored leaves, milder flavor with hints of clove and ginger—more savory than sweet; excellent in vinaigrettes, as a garnish, or in salads, and also used as a purple pesto; best eaten raw as cooking changes its flavor and color. How to use: layer slices of ripe, heirloom tomatoes and fresh mozzarella with purple basil leaves and top with sea salt, black pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. Make “Strawberry-Basil Mojitos” by muddling 1 cup of fresh strawberries, 1/2 cup of purple basil, 1/4 cup of fresh mint, and 8 limes (sliced), then add 1 cup of simple syrup and 2 cups of rum. Serve over ice and top off with club soda. Garnish with more basil.
**How to store: Whether your basil has a root or just stems, it will last longer when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or tabletop. Since basil is a tropical plant, it doesn’t like the cold, so will last longer outside of the refrigerator.

KALE (Red Russian Kale): the stems are purple, and leaves are deep gray-green, purple-veined, flat, non-curled, and tooth-edged. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

HOT PEPPERS: You will receive Shishito (sweet, mild, slender Japanese chiles about 2- to 4-inches with squarish end; often used in stir-fried dishes, salads, or as a pickled condiment) or Padron (heirloom pepper famous in Spain; typically 2 to 3 inch long; smaller peppers are milder, but the larger the pepper, the more it grows in heat; serve sautéed in olive oil with a little sea salt, or chop into many other dishes).
-How to use: Handle hot peppers with gloves, and cut on glass plate. Often roasted, chopped, and used to season corn bread and cheese dishes; good for stuffed appetizers, jams, salsa, and pickles. See newsletter recipes.
-How to store: For fresh peppers, store in refrigerator. For drying peppers, place string through the stems and hang in cool, dry, well-ventilated spot.

POTATOES: You will receive Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf– best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced.
See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Nova (beautiful orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent sweet flavor; firm and meaty), Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste) Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), or Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Nova (beautiful, bright orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent, sweet flavor), Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor), or Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads). You will also receive a few large Heirloom tomato varieties. We pick heirloom tomatoes slightly green sometimes to prevent splitting and damage, while transporting. Heirlooms are softer and more perishable when ripe, but the flavor of each is very memorable. Best to store upside down at room temperature until completely ripe. Very easy to can, freeze, and dehydrate for tomato flavors all season long!
-How to freeze: Core the big ones and cut smaller if you like, but just wash and pop the smaller tomatoes right into freezer bags. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Little Baby Flower (small, 2-4 lb. round fruit; bright green stripe pattern on shell and dark pink flesh that is sweet and crisp with a high sugar count) or Sunshine Yellow (8-10 pounds oval-rounded fruit; green-striped shell with bright yellow flesh, which is brittle, juicy, and very sweet). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
1. FAMILY FARM HIKE on Sept. 1: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm on Friday, the 1st, at 4 PM. We will have a guided tour for about a 45-60 minute hike around the farm for kids and adults. We will meet behind the Main House at the picnic tables in the back yard.

2. FALL WORK PARTY/END-OF SEASON POTLUCK will be Sunday, Sept. 24, between 1-4 P.M. Our end-of-season potluck will also be at this time, so please bring an hors d’oeuvre, snack, or refreshment to pass. Members are invited to bring family and friends to help harvest squash, pumpkins, and potatoes before the first frost. You may also come just to enjoy the farm and walk around to see the produce and the animals, listen to music, or just eat at the potluck anytime between 1 and 4 PM. We also will have sit-down activities, such as onion or garlic cleaning or dried herb stripping. Lots of kid-friendly activities, such as wagon rides, feeding animals, and bubbles. All who come will be able to take something home with them, such as a pumpkin or a winter squash. Please dress appropriately for the weather, since it will be scheduled rain or shine.

3. VACATIONS or OUT OF TOWN: Please remember to contact us at least by Saturday or Sunday (NOT in the middle of the same week of the switch) to make changes in pick up days or locations, especially with Labor Day just around the corner.

4. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
**U-pick Flowers– Some of the flowers are ready in the u-pick flower garden. You may pick 1 bouquet up to 10 stems per household for “free” in the u-pick flower garden on the farm. Extra bouquets $4.
**U-pick Tomatoes—many tomato varieties are ready for picking. Members–$1.00/lb. Non members–$1.50/lb.

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES

EIGHT GREAT WAYS TO SERVE SUMMER TOMATOES (Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
1. Cut tomatoes into wedges. Toss with finely chopped shallots, then splash with lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil.
2. Cut tomatoes in half lengthwise. Remove center of each, and fill with a large basil leaf and a chunk of fresh mozzarella cheese. Drizzle with purchased garlic-infused oil, and wrap in foil. Roast on an outdoor grill for five minutes.
3. Cut tomatoes in wedges. Shower with grated Parmesan cheese. Top with fresh oregano and a drizzle of olive oil.
4. Cut tomatoes into chunks, and place in blender. Add a pinch of sea salt, a few fresh basil leaves and several ice cubes. Blend until smooth and frothy for a refreshing drink.
5. Cube tomatoes and firm ricotta salt or feta cheese. Toss with cooked orzo (rice-shaped pasta), fresh mint and a favorite vinaigrette.
6. For bruschetta, top grilled Italian bread with a mixture of chopped tomatoes, minced garlic, extra- virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
7. Toss arugula with chopped tomatoes, orange segments, basil and toasted pine nuts. Dress with olive oil, orange juice and a splash of wine vinegar.
8. Slather a thick slice of bread with good mayonnaise. Cover with thick slices of juicy tomatoes. Sprinkle with coarse salt and Szechuan pepper or some cracked mixed peppercorns. Add some fresh mozzarella cheese slices. Mmmmmm!!!

SAUTÉED SHISHITO/PADRON PEPPERS
Ingredients:
½ lb. shishito peppers or substitute with padróns, rinsed
1 Tbsp. vegetable or sesame oil
sea salt or coarse salt to taste
Directions: In a large, wide frying pan or sauté pan, heat the oil over high heat for a minute or two. Add the peppers and sauté until the peppers begin to soften and cook around the edges (about 3 to 5 minutes). You want a few “burnt” or darkened spots here and there. Season with salt. Stir the peppers, so that they cook evenly. When the peppers have wilted, remove from heat and serve.

PESTO SAUCE (The Pleasure of Herbs)
2 c. washed fresh basil (Try any variety with this recipe!)
3 cloves garlic
4 Tbs. pine nuts or walnuts (optional)
1/2 c. olive oil
1/2 c. grated Parmesan cheese
Place all ingredients in the blender or food processor, except the cheese, which is added after the first ingredients are pasty; and then blended again briefly. Serve this on hot pasta, boiled potatoes, green beans, sliced tomatoes, corn-on-the-cob, steak, fish, or mix with yogurt as a dipping sauce for vegetables.

GARLIC, BASIL, CORN ON THE COB: Combine 2 tablespoons butter (softened), 1 tablespoon basil (chopped), and 1 garlic clove (minced) in a small bowl. Place 4 ears of corn into a large saucepan of boiling water; cook 4 minutes. Drain. Spoon 1 teaspoon butter mixture over each ear of corn. Delicious!

2017: Week 13, August 20-26

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #13
Aug. 20-26, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GREEN BEANS: You will receive Jade (long, slender, deep green, filet bean).
-How to use: raw in salads, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, etc.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 1 week

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems, which are side shoots this week. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing. See Week 11 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: We are letting our smaller patches of herbs recuperate for a week, so everyone will receive just basil this week.
*Genovese Basil—ALL SHARES will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top.

KALE (Green Curly): well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Ailsa Craig (a huge, sweet, mild, yellow-skinned, heirloom onion that is well known by British gardeners who grow show-size onions). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET RED PEPPERS: You will receive Red Knight Bell (big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red pepper with sweet flesh)
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc. Excellent roasted.
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES: You will receive Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!) and/or Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is good for baking or frying). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Nova (beautiful orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent sweet flavor; firm and meaty), Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste) Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), or Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor), or Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ALINA’s COOKING CLASS on Thurs. Aug. 24 from 6 to 8:30 PM: We are offering another cooking class with CSA members, Alina and Michael Makin, called “Eastern European Seaside Dinner” to show other ways to use up produce from your share box and make a healthy and tasty meal to share. More details to come. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

2. VACATIONS or OUT OF TOWN: Please remember to contact us at least by Saturday or Sunday (NOT in the middle of the same week of the switch) to make changes in pick up days or locations, especially with Labor Day just around the corner.

3. U-PICK BLACKBERRIES AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you $4/pint for members and $5/pint nonmembers.

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

MONARCH MATING SUNSET
by Richard (and Deb)

At the beginning of August the air was calm and still, and the moon shone bright from dusk until dawn easily guiding the deer to the sweet, fragrant melons and sweet corn. We put a little fence around the melon patch, which kept the deer out for awhile. But deer are clever and especially fond of melons, so soon they were jumping over and finding a sweet midnight snack in the still, misty moonlight, chomping at least ten melons every night. How delicious!! By now we have picked most of the ripe melons and distributed them in the CSA shares over the last few weeks. Over that time we brought up more than 600 melons to the cooler in the Packing Shed, all gently packed into 2-bushel boxes. One long afternoon we even had a moment before the evening chores to sit on the porch and eat some extra broken melons. Ah, such sweetness!

Looking through the tree branches over the neighbor’s bean field, I could see a monarch butterfly dipping, fluttering, and gliding among the oak leaves. I was wondering why this particular butterfly was flying up and around the branches. I didn’t see any nectar-filled flowers for her to hover around. Then I saw it! Another monarch butterfly! They fluttered around each other and then fluttered softly together, holding each other in the amber light of the late hours of the day. It looked like maybe they were mating. I wasn’t sure. Maybe they were just having fun. It was rather interesting at this time of year that they were interacting this way. But who knows, August may afford enough time to lay some eggs and make a caterpillar and a chrysalis before the first frost. Maybe eight weeks is enough time for a young caterpillar to grow into an adult butterfly.

The fourth week of August sparks the season of exaltation. Everything is in full swing. It’s the climax of seasonal abundance. All life forms are riding this wave of maximum photosynthesis. The land is in full bloom. It’s full of seeds. It’s full of fruiting. It’s full of insects. It’s full of amphibians. It’s full of reptiles. It’s full of mice. It’s spilling over. Its brimming. Warm days, not too hot. Gentle, cool nights. We start to see the tomatoes, peppers, melons, sweet corn, and many more mushrooms pop. It is the time for everything to be fully alive and awake. Perhaps the monarch has the same idea. You can see the adult monarchs drinking nectar from the orange butterfly-weed flower and the pink milkweed flower where they grow wild in the pasture. You see them drinking, giving them abundance of high energy. Nectar. Carbohydrates. To fly. To float over the land, over the pasture, over the branches with the energy of eternal delight. Through the woods. Through the tall grasses and orchard. Ah, the undeniable fortitude of the flowers! The pollination to set the seeds for life continues. In this world human beings create a lot of disappointment for themselves. Maybe at this time, it would be important for us to celebrate the green fertile earth. Reminding us that life continues. Reminding us to celebrate the beauty of this great intricate web.

RECIPES

GREEN BEANS WITH TOMATOES AND BASIL (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC) Serves 4-6
1 1/2 lbs green beans, cooked
1 garlic clove, diced
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 tomatoes (or several cherry tomatoes), and coarsely chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 Tbsp chopped fresh basil or 1 tsp of dried basil
1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley or 1 tsp of dried parsley

Cut beans into 1-inch lengths; set aside. Saute garlic and onion in oil in skillet until soft. Add tomatoes, salt and pepper and cook 2 minutes. Stir in basil and green beans. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer 3 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in parsley, and serve immediately.

ROASTED RED PEPPER PASTA (from http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2009/03/pasta-with-roasted-red-pepper-sauce-groan)
3 red bell peppers
2 tablespoons pine nuts (optional)
1/2 medium onion, finely diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup heavy cream
Flat leaf parsley, finely minced
Fresh Parmesan cheese, shaved or grated
1/2 to 1 pound pasta: orecchiette, penne, fusilli, etc.

Roast red peppers, then place in a Ziploc bag to allow to sweat. Peel the charred skins from the peppers, then removed seeds. Set aside. Lightly toast pine nuts in a skillet. Set aside. Puree peppers with pine nuts. Set aside. Cook pasta according to package directions. In a skillet or pot over medium heat, drizzle in olive oil. Add diced onions and garlic and cook until soft. Pour in pepper puree and stir together. Add plenty of salt. Pour in cream and stir to combine. Taste and add more salt, if necessary. Add cooked pasta, and then stir together. Place pasta into a bowl, top with chopped parsley and plenty of shaved Parmesan cheese.

BLUE POTATO HASH BROWNS (from www.garden-wiki.org/index.php5?topic=BLUE POTATO)
2 large (or 3 medium) blue potatoes
1 medium sweet onion
1 bell pepper
Your favorite cheese
Salt, to taste
Canola oil

Dice potatoes with a knife into small cubes (or shred for variety). Dice or slice onions and pepper. Place the above onto a hot skillet and add a few tablespoons of oil. Salt to taste. Cook them until they’ve been browning for a few minutes. Slice or shred cheese and toss onto hash browns just before removing them from the skillet to melt it. That’s it. Eat it. Perhaps next time you can try some tomatoes in the mix!

VEGETABLE TEMPURA
For 6 meal or 10 appetizer servings, prepare about 60 pieces of vegetable pieces (onion rings, whole green beans, zucchini, broccoli florets, carrots, beets, turnip slices, mushrooms, etc.)

Tempura Batter
2 1/2 cups sifted flour
3 egg yolks
2 cups cold water
Dash or salt
Oil for frying

Beat the egg yolks with the water and salt. When the mixture is smooth, sift in the pre-sifted flour gradually, stirring as you go. Stir only until the batter is combined. Heat oil in a deep, wide pan. The oil should be at least 325 degrees and not more than 350 degrees. Dip the veggies into the batter and carefully drop them into the oil. Fry until brown and puffy and risen to the surface. Drain on paper towels and either serve immediately, or keep warm in a 300 degree oven on a tray in a single layer.

2017: Week 12, August 13-19

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #12
Aug. 13-19, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL: Everyone will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, florets; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GREEN CABBAGE: a large, sweet, green cabbage; considered a beneficial digestive aid and intestinal cleanser; cabbage has a good amount of vitamins A and C, calcium, potassium, and magnesium. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing;

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

KALE (Rainbow Lacinato): unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LEEKS: green leaves with white to pale green stems.
Cooking tip: slit from top to bottom and wash thoroughly with root facing up to remove all of the dirt trapped between the leaf layers. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Mars Red (purple-red skinned onion with sweet flavor) or Ailsa Craig (a huge, sweet, mild, yellow-skinned, heirloom onion that is well known by British gardeners who grow show-size onions). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

PARSLEY: Everyone will receive Curly Parsley (curly, dark green leaves, often used as a garnish, but can be used the same as flat-leaf parsley) or Flat-leaf Parsley (flat, glossy, dark green leaves have a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh). Parsley is high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces.

PEARS: You will receive Red Clapp’s Pears (one of the first fresh-eating pears on the market; very red fruit; medium to large size, sweet, fine-grained with very white flesh and excellent flavor similar to a Bartlett, but more firm; ripening can occur either at room temperature or in the refrigerator) or Bartlett (bell-shaped fruit with smooth, green skin and sometimes blushed with red) or Anjou (wide, globular-based shape; pale green skin with creamy white, sweet flesh, and slightly gritty texture).
-How to use: can be eaten raw, sliced in salads, hot cereals, yogurts, stuffings, sauces, or butters; can be prepared by juicing, baking, poaching or sauteing; coat slices with lemon juice to keep from darkening.
-How to store: ripening can occur either at room temperature or in the refrigerator; remove from refrigerator several days before eating.

POTATOES: You will receive Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive some of any of the following: Nova (beautiful orangish-yellow grape tomato with excellent sweet flavor; firm and meaty), Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are firm, nice red color and good taste), San Marzano (early, large classic Italian roma tomato; delicious, balanced acidic flavor and meaty flesh makes for good sauce and paste) Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), or Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), or Sakura (early, delicious, bright red medium-sized cherry tomato with sweet flavor). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ZUCCHINI: You will receive some variety of Green or Yellow Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits) See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ALINA’s COOKING CLASS on Thurs. Aug. 24 from 6 to 8:30 PM: We are offering another cooking class with CSA members, Alina and Michael Makin, called “Eastern European Seaside Dinner” to show other ways to use up produce from your share box and make a healthy and tasty meal to share. More details to come. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

2. STILL ROOM FOR KID FARM DAY on Wed., Aug. 23, from 9 AM until 12 PM. This half-day will be for all kids who are 4 years old and older. Activities will include an edible farm walk, a nature craft to take home, and a fun movement activity! Snacks harvested from the farm will be included. Advance registration is required due to limited space. It looks like the t-shirts will arrive on time, so we are asking for a small fee of $10/child. Please register by e-mail to info@tantrefarm.com with names and ages of children, name of adult attending, phone number, and e-mail address.

3. U-PICK BLACKBERRIES AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you $4/pint for members and $5/pint nonmembers.

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RECIPES

LEAFY SALAD WITH PARSLEY-GARLIC VINAIGRETTE Serves 6-8
8-10 cups assorted salad greens
For the vinaigrette:
1 bunch parsley
2 garlic cloves
2 Tbsp stone ground mustard
2 Tbsp tamari or shoyu
1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper, or to taste
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Rinse the salad greens, tear them into bite-size pieces and set aside. Chop the parsley and mince or press the garlic and place in a large salad bowl. Mix in the mustard, tamari, pepper and oil. Add the greens to the bowl just before serving. Toss gently from the bottom to coat evenly with the dressing. Serve immediately.

POTATO, GARLIC AND PARSLEY SOUP (from The Organic Cookbook by Renee J. Elliot and Eric Treuille) Serves 4
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil or butter
1 1/2 lbs potatoes, quartered and finely sliced
1 onion, finely chopped
8 garlic cloves, finely sliced
2 handfuls fresh parsley, chopped
6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1/2 cup milk or heavy cream, optional
Salt and black pepper, to taste

Heat the oil or butter in a heavy-based pot. Add the potato slices, onion and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat until the onions are softened, 10 minutes. Add half the chopped parsley and the stock. Bring to a boil. Adjust the heat, partially cover and simmer gently until the potatoes are tender, 30 minutes. Add the remaining parsley. For a creamy soup, leave to cool slightly and puree until smooth with a hand blender or a food processor. Alternatively, leave the soup chunky. Stir in the milk or cream, if using. Thin with water as needed. Add salt and pepper to taste. Ladle into warm bowls and serve hot.

FRESH APPLE OR PEAR CAKE (from www.cooks.com)
3 cups flour

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp soda

2 apples (or pears)

3 eggs

2 cups sugar

1 1/4 cups oil

1 tsp vanilla

1 cup nuts

Combine dry ingredients. Add chopped nuts. Add apples (or pears), peeled and finely chopped. Add eggs, sugar, oil and vanilla. Fold well. Bake in tube pan at 350 degrees for 1 hour.

BASIL GRAIN SALAD (from Lorna Sass’ Complete Vegetarian Kitchen) Serves 4-6
3 cups cooked grains
1 lb small zucchini, halved and cut into 1/4-inch slices
2 cups cooked corn kernels
3/4 cup tightly packed minced fresh basil
1/4 cup thinly sliced scallion greens or onions
1/4 cup olive oil
3 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice or balsamic vinegar (approximately)
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp sea salt, or to taste

Place the cooked grains in a large serving bowl. Add zucchini, corn, basil, and scallion greens and toss. In a food processor or jar, prepare the dressing by combining the remaining ingredients. Pour the dressing over the grain mixture and toss well. Taste and add more lemon juice and salt, if needed.
Variation: Substitute fresh dill or coriander for the basil.

ZUCCHINI CUCUMBER SOUP (from Gourmet Magazine, August 2006)
1 lb zucchini or summer squash variety, chopped
3/4 lb seedless cucumber (about 2 cups) or scoop seeds out
1/3 cup chopped sweet onion
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 cups water
1 tsp chopped fresh hot green chile
1 1/8 tsp salt
1 tsp ground coriander
1/2 cup (4 oz) creme fraiche or plain yogurt
Garnish with fresh cilantro or parsley, chopped

Puree zucchini, cucumber, onion, vinegar, water, chile, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon coriander in a blender until very smooth. Whisk remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon coriander into creme fraiche or yogurt. Serve topped with dollops of creme fraiche or yogurt and cilantro or parsley.

ZUCCHINI AND TOMATOES WITH PASTA (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure) Serves 4
16 oz medium-sized pasta
6 Tbsp olive oil
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1-2 medium zucchinis, halved lengthwise, 1/4-inch slices
2 fresh tomatoes, diced
1/2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
1 (6 oz) can sliced black olives
Salt and pepper, to taste

Cook pasta, drain and keep hot. Meanwhile, heat oil in skillet over medium heat. Saute garlic and zucchini until tender, about 3-5 minutes. Add tomatoes, pepper flakes, basil, and olives; season with salt and pepper. Simmer 10 minutes. Toss with hot pasta.

2017: Week 11, August 6-12

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #11
Aug. 6-12, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.
In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BLACKBERRIES: plump, purplish-black fruits that grow on brambles–ours is a thornless variety; largest of all berries, the blackberries are tiny fruits clustered together around a core, which are juicy and have a sweet-sour flavor. Freeze by tossing them in a ziplock bag for smoothies, jams, pies, or sauces during the winter. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing; corn is often referred to as maize and is an ancient staple food of the Americas; everything on the corn plant can be used: “husks” for Tamales, the “silk” for medicinal tea, the “kernels” for food, and the “stalks” for fodder; contains a significant amount of vitamin A, B-complex, phosphorous and potassium along with vegetable protein. * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some earworms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.
-How to use: ears of corn can be steamed in 1-2 inches of water for 6-10 minutes, or drop ears into boiling water (enough to cover) for 4-7 minutes; ears of corn can also be roasted unhusked in the oven or outside grill for about 20 minutes.
-How to store: refrigerate with husks on, and use as soon as possible to retain sweetness and flavor.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh. Lots of cucumbers this week, so see “Recipes”. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.

You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 6 options:
1. Anise Hyssop: catnip-like, soft, sweet, anise-scented leaves are used as a seasoning, as a delicious licorice-flavored tea, and in potpourri; the purple flower spike is favored by bees, who make a light fragrant honey from the nectar; it was used medicinally by Native Americans for coughs, fevers, wounds, and diarrhea.
2. Marjoram: a small and oval-shaped leaf, which is light green with a grayish tint. When fresh it is spicy, bitter, and slightly pungent with camphor-like notes, so often added to fish sauces, salads and dressings, tomato-based sauces, grilled lamb and other meats; goes well with vegetables including cabbages, potatoes, eggplant, and beans. It is usually added at the end of cooking to retain its delicate flavor or as a garnish. Traditionally, it was used in tea to cure headaches, head colds, calm nervous disorders, and to clear sinuses.
3. Italian Flat-leaf Parsley: flat, glossy, dark green leaves have a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces to go with meat dishes.
4. Sage–an herb from an evergreen shrub in the mint family with long, narrow, grayish-green leaves; a musky aroma and a warm and spicy taste; used in making sausages, stews, breads, pickles and teas. The flowers are edible and make nice garnishes and can be infused into a delicious vinaigrette!
5. Lemon Balm– these fragrant lemon-minty leaves make a delicate herbal tea, served hot or cold, and helps with depression, tension, or nausea; good addition to lettuce/fruit salads and ice cream; pairs well with fish, lamb, & tossed with steamed vegetables.
6. Winter Savory: is a semi-evergreen, perennial herb; its strong spicy flavor goes well with beans and meat; medicinally it has antiseptic, aromatic, carminative, and digestive benefits, as well as relieves bee stings; fresh savory has a strong spicy-peppery flavor and resinous odor similar to fresh thyme; prior to widespread European use of long pepper and black pepper, savory filled a similar role in European cuisine.

KALE (Green Curly): well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET ONIONS (Walla Walla): sweet, mild, juicy, yellow-skinned; nice as a “green top” onion; not for storage
-How to use: great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, onion rings, and other dishes for flavor.
-How to store: not for long storage; wrap in damp towel or plastic bag in fridge for 2-7 days.

PEACHES or PEARS: Since there are not enough specific varieties of fruit for the whole week, Wednesday CSA members will receive Red Haven Peaches (an early, rosy-orange skinned peach with firm, creamy yellow flesh; some peaches may be a little firm, but will continue to ripen after they are picked. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.) and Friday/Saturday CSA members will receive Red Clapp’s Pears (one of the first fresh-eating pears on the market; very red fruit; medium to large size, sweet, fine-grained with very white flesh and excellent flavor similar to a Bartlett, but more firm; ripening can occur either at room temperature or in the refrigerator).

POTATOES: You will receive Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUMMER SQUASH/ZUCCHINI: You will receive some variety of Green or Yellow Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits) or Yellow Crookneck (long, curved neck with a sometimes bumpy, yellow skin; buttery flavor and firm texture). See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CHERRY TOMATOES: You will receive some of the following kinds of cherry tomatoes depending on your distribution site options: Sakura (bright-red, shiny, medium-large cherry tomato with real sweet tomato flavor and firmness without being hard) or Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), or Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Little Baby Flower (small, 2-4 lb. round fruit; bright green stripe pattern on shell and dark pink flesh that is sweet and crisp with a high sugar count) or Dark Bell (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ALINA’s COOKING CLASS on Thurs. Aug. 24 from 6 to 8:30 PM: We are offering another cooking class with CSA members, Alina and Michael Makin, at the end of August to show other ways to use up produce from your share box and make a healthy and tasty meal to share. More details to come. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

2. KID FARM DAY will be on Wed., Aug. 23, from 9 AM until noon. This half-day will be for all kids who are 4 years old and older. Activities will include an edible farm walk, a nature craft to take home, and a fun movement activity! Snacks harvested from the farm will be included. Advance registration is required due to limited space. We may provide t-shirts, so are asking for a small fee of around $10/child, but will finalize this as the date gets closer. Please register by e-mail to info@tantrefarm.com with names and ages of children, name of adult attending, phone number, and e-mail address. Anyone interested in helping out, please contact Deb.

3. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
-Blackberries–$4/pint for members and $5/pint nonmembers.

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

CORN LOVERS OF ALL SIZES
We are sure you’ve been waiting impatiently as we have for our first bite of corn. This cold weather has kept this high summer crop slow growing, but it is finally ready. As we introduce you to your first ear of Tantre corn, we would be remiss if we forgot about our yearly introductions to two fellow corn lovers: the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) and the Corn Earworm (Heliothis zea), which you may have encountered already.

The European corn borer has been a resident of the U.S. since the early 1900s. The larvae are grayish-pink caterpillars with dark heads and spots on the top of each segment about 1 inch long. They chew on leaves and tassels of corn, but especially favor the tasty insides of stalks and ears. It is not partial to corn though, since it has been recorded on 200 different plants, including beans, celery, beets, and potatoes.

Despite the fact that we hear much about the corn borer, the earworm is probably the worst pest of corn. It is said that American farmers grow two million acres of corn a year just to feed it. The color of the larvae varies from white to green and even red. They have four pairs of prolegs, are spined, and 1-1/2 inches long. These voracious eaters enter corn ears at the tip and work their way to the kernels.

If you are “lucky” enough to encounter one of these guests in your ear of corn this week, don’t throw the ear away, just break off the offensive part and cook the rest. We are “pleased” to introduce you to these smaller relatives who share your taste for corn.

RECIPES

TABBOULI (The World in Your Kitchen)
1/2 c. bulgur
a few lettuce leaves
4 Tbs. chopped fresh parsley, divided
2 Tbs. chopped fresh mint
1 onion, finely sliced
4 tomatoes, chopped
1 cucumber, chopped
4 Tbs. lemon juice
4 Tbs. olive oil
salt & pepper to taste

Soak bulgur 20-30 minutes in cold water to cover. Drain well. Line a salad bowl with lettuce leaves and spoon in bulgur. Mix in 3 tablespoons of the parsley, mint, onion, and tomatoes. Whisk lemon juice with olive oil, salt and pepper; toss with salad. Sprinkle remaining tablespoon of parsley on top. Serves 4-6.

GOLDEN SUMMER SQUASH & CORN SOUP (from Eatingwell.com)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium shallot (or onion), chopped
2 medium summer squash, (about 1 pound), diced
3 teaspoons chopped fresh herbs, divided
2 cups chicken broth, or vegetable broth
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup fresh corn kernels
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add shallot and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add squash and 1 teaspoon herbs and cook, stirring occasionally, until the squash starts to soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Add broth and salt; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook until the squash is soft and mostly translucent, about 5 minutes more. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. (Use caution when pureeing hot liquids.) Return the soup to the pan and stir in corn. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender, 3 to 5 minutes more. Remove from the heat; stir in lemon juice. Serve garnished with the remaining 2 teaspoons herbs and feta.