Immune Booster Week 9, May 16, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 9) SHARE
May 16, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 9) SHARE!

As many of you know we did not have an exact idea of what would happen when the coronavirus hit our community and how we ourselves would be directly affected.  Now more than ever, Americans are waking up to the critical importance of having small and mid-scale diversified farmers to feed them. Resilience of any ecological or economic system is based on diversity as well as a community of support.  One aspect of this is the message that we are strongest when we work together. Through the Immune Booster CSA, local farmers and food businesses have been banding together for the good of the local community and to keep each other economically afloat.  
After a successful launching of the Immune Booster CSA during the first few months of the pandemic, we have found that this weekly multi food business CSA share has been extremely appreciated and is still very needed right now. On the other hand our 18-week Summer CSA season is about to begin in just 2 weeks and is sold out (as are most other CSA’s in the area). It grew rapidly with over 100 sign ups during the month of March due to an overwhelming onslaught of support that we did not expect. The summer season is what we look forward to all winter, and it becomes extremely busy for us working in the fields, going to markets, and attending to the needs of our summer members.  We have been continuously brainstorming about how we can fulfill the need for more food for our community in safe ways, but with very little extra time, and we have come up with a possible solution.  
We have decided to offer the continuation of the weekly Immune Booster CSA, but under the leadership of two dedicated and excited Tantre Farm crew, Ryan Poe and Peter Ways, who are taking it over, but with Tantre support.  Ryan, manager, grew up on a self-sustaining farm, earning his pennies for the first 15 years of his life growing and selling fruits and vegetables on his family’s roadside stand. He is an avid world traveler and appreciates good, clean food.  He also worked his way up from Farmer to Produce Director at a local organic farm just outside of Ann Arbor.  Peter Ways is a retired educator and volunteer business consultant to Tantre Farm. He’ll be involved and supporting Ryan until the new Immune Booster Share is fully launched.
Many things will remain the same with this new Immune Booster CSA, such as registrations will still take place every Monday until Wednesday and distribution will continue to be on Saturdays from 9 AM until 12 PM.  One difference in order to streamline the logistics of organizing and distributing your share, is that all pickups will be at the Washtenaw Food Hub in Ann Arbor, and all payments will be done online with PayPal to eliminate the hours spent recording checks and Venmo and the delay of payments being deposited on a weekly basis.
The new Immune Booster share will always contain a consistent and delicious variety of local salad greens, mixed vegetables, ready-made goodies, sweet treats with the occasional bonus item mixed in. We will wear masks and gloves and follow national and international food handling guidelines regarding the pandemic. Vegan and gluten-free shares are available upon request.  Ryan and Peter will be there to greet you with a smile and hand you your carefully packed box with a curbside flourish.  Stay posted for their  Sunday evening email broadcasts that will highlight items lined up for each new week’s Immune Booster Share, or find our updated posts on the Tantre Farm website.  
Next week is the launch of our first “new and improved” Immune Booster share and it will  contain several surprises in it.  Here are a few hints that maybe in next week’s box, so see if you can guess what they may be:  What is thick, brown, and syrupy that comes from a tree?  What can be cold, velvety, and vegan all at the same time?  What brings to mind the fresh aroma of the Mediterranean and summer in a pot?  What is a spear that only is available in the spring?
Ryan and Peter look forward to hearing your weekly feedback on the shares and hope that you will continue to be involved.  They also welcome suggestions on how to improve or offer new ideas of other local businesses, who are local sourcing.  Some folks might also be interested in supplementing their Summer CSA with this weekly share, and truly rarely will need to enter a grocery store during this pandemic time if they join both CSA’s. Please contact Ryan and Peter with questions or comments at immuneboosterbytantre@gmail.com.
It is with our dedicated mission of “Stronger Farmers, Stronger Community, and Stronger Earth” that we bring you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Second Spring Farm, Goetz Family Farm, Harvest Kitchen and Raterman Bread.  As always thank you to our hardworking crew of Donn, John, Peter, Annie, Andy, Geoff, Jbird, Ryan, Chizo, Karis, Shaunna,  and new interns Hannah, Leo, Andrew, Jacob, and Ro, who continue to pull these shares together for you!  Also, if by some chance you notice that you are missing items from your share at any time, please let us know, since sometimes we make mistakes, because of the long day.  We can usually substitute something else or sometimes the same thing the following week if needed, so just let us know.
**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now, except for those of you willing to drop your boxes off at the Food Hub or the Farm.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for assistance, if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time soon.  If you paid with PayPal or Venmo, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in our labeled Payment Bag.  
Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so that we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.
THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  Also, if you have time to support or thank the businesses that helped provide us with so many convenient Pick Up Locations during these past 9 weeks, please express your gratitude to ROOSROAST and the WASHTENAW FOOD HUB in Ann Arbor, PURE PASTURES in Plymouth, and AGRICOLE FARM STOP in Chelsea.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy with so many wonderful partners in our community.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for a happy spring!              
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s” AURA SOLANALES HOT SAUCE:  A Louisiana style naturally fermented hot sauce capturing the warmth and flavor of sun-ripened hot peppers. Medium hot and will not overpower, but enhance any meal!  Ingredients include: red hot peppers (jalapeño, cayenne, cherry bomb, serrano, fresno) distilled vinegar, filtered water, sea salt, garlic powder. The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: used on just about anything: eggs, chili, tacos, meats, veggie dishes, bread, etc.
-How to store: Keep this fermented product REFRIGERATED for up to 3 months or longer.  The flavor becomes more complex and rich the longer it ferments.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA OR SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: You will receive 1 /4 pound of pea or sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, top on egg dish, or sandwiches,  excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Ginger Deli’s” SPINACH CARIBBEAN SPICES RICE:   You will receive a pint of this dish with the following ingredients:  sauteed fresh Tantre’s Spinach, steamed Second Spring Farm’s Rainbow Carrots, crushed tomaotes, fragrant West African and Caribbean spices mixed with Jollof rice and topped with green beans, cherry tomatoes, and sauteed zucchini.  This vegan and gluten-free rice dish was created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea.
-How to use:  serve as a main dish or as a side dish with any meal
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to 7 days.

“Ginger Deli’s” KOHLRABI SALAD: This salad is 100% vegan and gluten free.  It can also be nut-free, if you choose not to add the crushed peanuts and dried shallot cup.   This salad is featuring shredded kohlrabi, carrot, daikon radish, and a pickled watermelon-radish rose or carrot, along with shredded green papaya and a dash of cilantro, mint, chives, and mango with a dressing in a separate cup of water, lime, minced garlic, chili flakes, vinegar, and Northern Michigan maple  syrup.  This salad is created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea.
-How to use: when ready to use, take dressing out of cup and toss with shredded vegetables and top with cup of nuts and shallots
-How to store: keep in refrigerator for 5 days

“Goetz Family Farm’s” MIXED GREENS:   This bag of greens will be mixed with savory mizuna, mustard greens, tatsoi, and Red Russian kale.  Goetz Farm is a 3-generation family farm in Riga, MI.  You can find their produce at both Argus Farm Stops, Ann Arbor Farmer’s  Market, Downtown Farmington Farmer’s Market and Chelsea Farmer’s Market.  See https://www.localharvest.org/goetz-family-farm-M56215 for more information.
-How to use:  used for salads and sauteing–cooks up quickly
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 2-4 days.

“Goetz Family Farm’s LETTUCE: a leafy, herbaceous annual grown mostly for salad, but especially delicious at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C.
How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups.
How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Harvest Kitchen’s”   THE WOLVERINE GRANOLA:  A savory anti-granola that makes an excellent condiment for seasonal salads or a light crunchy snack.  The Wolverine Granola is seasoned with toasted fennel, coriander, and cumin seeds and balanced with a bit of local honey then  tossed with organic sunflower, flax, pumpkin seeds, and sesame oil infused with chili peppers.  It’s bite is worse than it’s bark!  Harvest Kitchen (https://harvest-kitchen.com) produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale  at info@harvest-kitchen.com .
-How to use: mix with yogurt, salad topping, bake in bread or muffins, roll in bananas and freeze, toss it with oatmeal
-How to store:  Store for many days in an airtight container at room temperature.

“Raterman Bread’s “ WHOLE WHEAT SOURDOUGH BREAD: This Whole Wheat Sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives by fermentation of dough with naturally occurring lactobacilli and yeast making it more nutritious and easier to digest. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.
-How to use: roast it with chicken, good as toast or sandwiches, use as a bread bowl for soup, make homemade croutons or stuffing
-How to store: lasts for 4 to 5 days at room temperature

“Second Spring Farm’s” RAINBOW CARROTS:   **If you were expecting cabbage this week, we apologize, since we didn’t realize how low our supply was.  We bring you Rainbow Carrots instead!  A carrot is a root, whose skin color can be white, red, purple, or yellow, but more commonly know for their bright orange color; high in all kinds of various nutrients based on their color.  Thanks to our former intern (2003)-turned-farmer, Reid Johnston, of Second Spring Farm (www.secondspringfarm.net). He is providing you with his certified organic carrots from Cedar, MI.
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

“Tantre Farm’s” GREEN GARLIC:  young, baby garlic with tender leaves that is harvested early in the season before the bulb is fully formed; long, green top that looks a bit like scallions with usually a tiny white or red (depending on the variety) bulb at the end; more mellow and less spicy in flavor then regular garlic
-How to use: can be used raw or cooked like scallions; use as a pesto or subbed in for garlic in a plethora of pasta dishes to get just the right amount of spring on your menu.
-How to store: keep in the refrigerator in a plastic bag or wrapped in a damp cloth for 1 week

“Tantre Farm’s” POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container

“Tantre Farm’s” SPINACH:  You will receive a bag of crisp, dark green leaf; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

“Zingerman’s Creamery” BRIDGEWATER CHEESE:  This robust, creamy, soft-ripened cheese is made from fresh cow’s milk and spiked with hand-cracked Tellicherry Peppercorns. The full-flavored peppery zing perfectly complements slight citrus and gentle mushroom notes of the paste. Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use:  Perfect with blueberry jam and a crisp Michigan hard cider; delicious spread on Raterman’s wholewheat sourdough.
-How to store: Store for several weeks

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. TANTRE FARM’S SUMMER CSA IS SOLD OUT FOR 2020!!  If you were interested in our 18-week Summer CSA (which will start the week of May 24-30), we have had an overwhelming response and had to close early, since we had no more room.  If you are interested, please email us at info@tantrefarm.com to be put on a Waiting List, in case someone cancels and since we are figuring out the logistics of creating an alternate CSA.  More details will be coming soon about the Summer CSA.

2. SHARE PARTNERS NEEDED:  Many former members did not get into the Summer CSA, because it sold out very early.  If any of you who are already registered for the Summer CSA were considering alternating weeks or splitting a share with a share partner, please let us know, because someone who couldn’t get in would probably be very grateful to be your share partner.   Please let us know by letting us know your current pick up location.

3. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

4. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order with your phone number.   Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

5. FARMERS MARKETS OPENING: Several local farmers markets, including the Ann Arbor and Chelsea Farmers Markets are opening  finally with limited hours, online stores, and curbside pickup, but no table displays as of yet.  Please support our friends by ordering and buying from them and of course wearing masks and gloves.  We will not be participating at the markets with this method for right now, so please support us at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops, or Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea, and also by supporting our weekly shares.  We appreciate you!

6.  SEEDLINGS FOR SALE:  Our good friends at Frog Holler Organic Farm (Brooklyn, MI) have certified organic plant starts available for online ordering through froghollerorganic.com with home delivery options and Ann Arbor pick up locations, such as at the Ann Arbor Farmers Farmers Market.  Also our community partner, Goetz Greenhouse and Family Farm (Riga, MI) also has vegetable and flower seedlings for sale through their online store at https://www.sites.google.com/site/goetzgreenhouse with pick up options at the Ann Arbor and Chelsea Farmers Markets, so please contact them soon if you want to get your fingers in the dirt.  Happy gardening!

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!  Lots and lots of ideas!

CURRIED GREENS AND POTATOES (from Eating Well is the Best Revenge by Marian Burros)  Serves 2
1 lb (16 oz) potatoes, cut into bite size pieces
1 bag mixed greens (mustard, collard, kale, turnip, beet, dandelion)
1 or more clove(s) of garlic (1 or 2 stems of green garlic)
1 tsp olive oil
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp turmeric
1/4 (or less) teaspoon hot pepper flakes or the Brinery’s Hot Sauce
2 cups canned, crushed, no salt tomatoes

Scrub, but do not peel potatoes.  Boil or steam for 17-20 minutes until tender.  Trim tough stems from greens, wash well, tear or slice into small pieces.  Mince garlic: use a 1/2 teaspoon of salt to help mincing.  Heat oil in pan, add greens and garlic.  When greens begin to soften, add spices and tomatoes, reduce heat and continue to cook.  Drain potatoes and cut into bite size pieces.  Add to the greens and continue to cook over low heat to blend flavors.  
Note: Choose any combination of greens and serve with Raterman’s sourdough bread.  

MUSTARD GREENS WITH GINGER AND HOT PEPPER (from Mad Mares Cookbook)
2 Tbsp sesame oil
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 lb Goetz’s mixed greens, washed, drained, and cut into strips
3 cloves garlic, minced (1 bunch green garlic, chopped)
1 Tbsp fresh hot pepper, finely minced or the Brinery’s Hot Sauce
1 Tbsp fresh ginger, minced
2 Tbsp vinegar
1 Tbsp honey
Salt and pepper, to taste

In wok or large pan, combine oils over high heat, but do not allow to smoke.  Add greens and stir briskly for 1 minute or until color changes to bright green.  Add garlic, pepper, and ginger; stir and cook another 30 seconds.  Add vinegar and honey.  Remove from heat and combine well.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

SPINACH MASHED POTATOES (https://feedmephoebe.com/spinach-mashed-potatoes/)
2 pounds potatoes, peeled and diced
10 ounces spinach
1/2 cup vegetable or chicken stock
Sea salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Place the potatoes in a large pot and cover with cold water by 1 inch. Bring to a boil and cook until the potatoes are fork tender, about 15 minutes. Fold in the spinach and cook for an additional minute. Drain the potato mixture and return to the pot along with ¼ cup stock, 1 teaspoon salt, and the oil. With a fork or masher, smash the potatoes until semi-smooth. Add more liquid if the potatoes seem too thick and dry. Fold in the butter and taste for seasoning.

WARM SPINACH SALAD WITH ARUGULA (from Mad Mares Cookbook)
1  bag spinach  
4 Tbsp vinegar      
2 cup arugula leaves (or Goetz’s Mixed Greens)
2 tsp sugar
4 Tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste
3/4 lb mushrooms, sliced
1/3 cup toasted nuts
4 scallions or green garlic
1/3 cup feta cheese (or try Zingerman’s Bridgewater Cheese)
Prepare arugula and spinach.  Heat oil and saute mushrooms and scallions until scallions have softened.  Add vinegar, sugar, salt, pepper, stirring until heated through.  Pour the mixture immediately over the arugula and spinach.  Sprinkle with nuts and crumbled feta cheese.

ANGEL HAIR PASTA WITH GREEN GARLIC CREAM SAUCE (from www.chow.com)
2 Tbsp unsalted butter (1/4 stick)
1/2 medium yellow onion, small dice
1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp minced green garlic (white and light green parts only)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 lb angel hair pasta
1 lb asparagus (about 1 bunch), woody ends removed and thinly sliced on the bias
12 oz sugar snap peas, strings removed and thinly sliced on the bias (about 3 1/2 cups)

Bring a large pot of heavily salted water to a boil over high heat.  Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat until foaming.  Add the onion and 1/4 cup of the garlic.  Season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is tender but not browned, about 5 minutes.  Add the cream and bring to a boil.  Immediately reduce the heat to low and simmer until the onion is completely tender and the flavors have infused the cream, about 5 minutes.  Taste and season with more salt and pepper as needed. Remove the sauce from the heat and set aside.  Add the pasta and vegetables to the boiling water.  Boil, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender and the pasta is cooked all the way through, about 4-5 minutes.  Reserve 3/4 cup of the pasta water.  Drain the pasta and vegetables and return them to the pot.  Add the reserved cream sauce, remaining 2 tablespoons garlic, and 1/2 cup of the pasta water.  Toss to coat the pasta and vegetables, adding more pasta water by the tablespoonful as needed to reach the desired consistency.  Taste and season with more salt and pepper as needed; serve immediately or add some Brinery Hot Sauce for an added zing!

CARROT SOUP WITH NORTH AFRICAN SPICES (from Fields of Greens)  Makes 9-10 cups
5 cups light vegetable stock
10 thin coins of ginger
1 Tbsp light olive oil
1 medium size yellow onion, thinly sliced, about 1 ½ cups
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped (or 2 -4 green garlic)
1 1/2 tsp cumin seed, toasted and ground
1 tsp coriander seed, toasted and ground
2 tsp grated fresh ginger
Cayenne pepper, to taste
2 lbs carrots, thinly sliced, about 1 cup
1 medium size sweet potato, peeled and thinly sliced, about 1 cup
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1/2 cup creme fraiche
2 Tbsp coarsely chopped cilantro

Make the stock and keep it warm over low heat.  Heat the olive oil in a soup pot and add the onion and 1/2 teaspoon salt.  Saute over medium heat until it begins to release its juices, about 5 minutes.  Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, ginger and a few pinches of cayenne.  Cook until the onion is very soft, about 10 minutes, adding a little stock if it sticks to the pan.  Add the carrots, the potato or sweet potato, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1 quart stock.  Bring to a gentle boil, then reduce the heat, cover and simmer until carrots are very tender, about 15 minutes.  Puree the soup in a blender or food processor until smooth, using a little extra stock if needed.  Return to the pot, add the orange juice and thin with stock to the desired consistency.  Season with salt to taste; for additional heat a pinch or two of cayenne.   Garnish each serving with a swirl of creme fraiche and sprinkle with cilantro.  This dish may pair nicely with Ginger Deli’s Spinach Rice dish.

Immune Booster Week 8, May 9, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 8) SHARE
May 9, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 8) SHARE!
“By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d…”   Almost all the cherry blossoms have been opening among the sour cherry trees along the roads and along the fence lines.  These earliest fruits of the year lure many of the birds and the raccoons to their sweet, tart flavors.  It is the birds and raccoons that spread the seeds around the hedge rows from their full bellies.  However this year, at least this weekend, it looks like we will loose most of the blossoms to an unseasonably cold freeze.   We are expecting an 8-hour window of below freezing temperatures with an extreme low for two hours of 23 degrees.  This polar freeze could take out most of the peach and sweet cherry blossoms as well.  

“By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d…”  The trees, so beautifully trimmed, ornament the green hills and fields with their pink and white blossoms.  Are the record lows due to some unforeseen result of lack of solar flares? Maybe lack of earth’s magnetism? Could it be the passage of this earth’s solar system through the Milky Way nebula?  What is the most likely cause for this unusual freeze?  Perhaps some careless force beyond our control or our collective wrong doing of burning too much fossil fuel.  Perhaps it is likely to be our collective sins of overconsumption and waste.  Nonetheless we may suffer the loss of all these delicate blooms by the end of today; not just us, but the raccoons and the birds that forage heartily, these wild creatures who replant the fruit for future generations to come.  When we think about these special planters of cherry pits, it is a wonder that they create such benefit with no intention, and yet the delight is so sweet and delicious.  Perhaps because there is no intention to do so.   If only we could learn this important lesson as civilized creatures.  “By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d…”

It is with a bit of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 verse that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Wayward Seed Farm, Second Spring Farm, Goetz Family Farm, and the return of Harvest Kitchen and Raterman Bread.  As always thank you to our hardworking crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Annie, Andy, Geoff, Jbird, Ryan, Chizo, and new interns Karis and Shaunna,  who continue to pull these shares together for you!  Also, if by some chance you notice that you are missing items from your share at any time, please let us know, since some of our crew are volunteering to work 12-14 hours on Fridays to make up these share boxes for you, and sometimes we make mistakes, because of the long day.  We can usually substitute something else or sometimes the same thing the following week if needed, so just let us know.

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now, except for those of you willing to drop your boxes off at the Food Hub or the Farm.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for assistance, if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we may delay in entering check payments. We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time in the next few weeks.  If you paid with PayPal or Venmo, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in our labeled Payment Bag.  

****WE ARE STILL MISSING THE NAME OF SOMEONE WHO PAID $85 CASH IN AN UNLABELED ENVELOPE FOR WEEK 4!!!  

We have also recently acquired VENMO, so if you have that app, please feel free to send money that way to @Deb-Lentz, with 6748 as the last four numbers of the phone number. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so that we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  Also, if you have time to support or thank the businesses that are helping us provide you with convenient Pick Up Locations, please express your gratitude to ROOSROAST and the WASHTENAW FOOD HUB in Ann Arbor, PURE PASTURES in Plymouth, and AGRICOLE FARM STOP in Chelsea.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy with so many wonderful partners in our community.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for a happy spring!              
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s” BEET KVASS:   This gluten-free, fermented beet drink is a dark, rich burgundy with a tart, tangy flavor using the very simple ingredients of beets, water, and salt. Beet kvass is high in vitamin C,  helps boost your immune system and can help stave off the cold virus. It’s unusually high in manganese, a mineral that is needed for the health of your bones, liver, kidneys and pancreas; cleanses the liver and is a good treatment for kidney stones and other ailments. The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: can be drank as a tonic, straight up, it can be used in place of vinegar in cooking or in salad dressings, it’s also a great addition to soup and you can even use it in cocktail, the way you would a vinegar shrub.
-How to store: Keep this fermented product REFRIGERATED for 7 to 10 days.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA OR SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive 1 /4 pound of pea or sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, top on egg dish, or sandwiches,  excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Ginger Deli’s” SPINACH CHICKEN SOUP or SPINACH VEGETABLE SOUP:   You will receive either a gluten-free, aromatic Spinach Chicken Soup (organic chicken broth, Tantre spinach, ginger, roasted onion, sea salt, house-made chicken patties, cinnamon, cardamom, star anise, clove, bay leaves, and Jasmine rice)  OR a vegan, gluten-free Spinach Vegetable Soup (King mushroom, Tantre carrots and spinach, chayote, roasted onion, roasted ginger, daikon radishes, cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, sea salt, star anise, bay leaves and Jasmine rice).  Please check the ingredient labels and let us know if you received an incorrect soup, and we will try to fix it.  These soups are created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea.
-How to use:  reheat with Raterman bread and top with a garnish of Garden Works pea or sunflower shoots
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to 7 days or freeze

“Goetz Family Farm’s” ASPARAGUS:   You will receive a half pound bunch of these green spears; good amount of vitamin A and fair source of vitamin B and C and iron.  Goetz Farm is a 3-generation family farm in Riga, MI.  You can find their produce at both Argus Farm Stops, Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market, Downtown Farmington Farmer’s Market and Chelsea Farmer’s Market.  See https://www.localharvest.org/goetz-family-farm-M56215 for more information.
-How to use: serve raw chopped in salads or with dips; steam, roasted, grilled, serve “cold” with vinaigrette or with a bit of olive oil and dash of salt and lemon juice.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth and plastic bag and refrigerate or bundle spears with rubber band and place upright in container with inch of water.

“Goetz Family Farm’s LETTUCE: a leafy, herbaceous annual grown mostly for salad, but especially delicious at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C.
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Harvest Kitchen’s”   PURE MICHIGAN GRANOLA:  A granola style celebration of the diversity of the Michigan Bounty. Ferris Farms organic rolled oats, organic flax seeds and organic sunflower seeds with Traverse Bay Farms organic dried wild blueberries, and Lesser Farms Honey.  Harvest Kitchen (https://harvest-kitchen.com) produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale  at info@harvest-kitchen.com .
-How to use: mix with yogurt, salad topping, bake in bread or muffins, roll in bananas and freeze, toss it with oatmeal
-How to store:  Store for many days in an airtight container at room temperature.

“Raterman Bread’s “ SOURDOUGH BREAD: This Original Sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives by fermentation of dough with naturally occurring lactobacilli and yeast making it more nutritious and easier to digest. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.
-How to use: roast it with chicken, good as toast or sandwiches, use as a bread bowl for soup, make homemade croutons or stuffing
-How to store: lasts for 4 to 5 days at room temperature

“Second Spring Farm’s” RAINBOW CARROTS:   A carrot is a root, whose skin color can be white, red, purple, or yellow, but more commonly know for their bright orange color; high in all kinds of various nutrients based on their color.  Thanks to our former intern (2003)-turned-farmer, Reid Johnston, of Second Spring Farm (www.secondspringfarm.net). He is providing you with his certified organic carrots from Cedar, MI.
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

“Tantre Farm’s” GREEN ONIONS (also called “Scallions”): young shoots of bulb onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants, high in potassium and source of vitamins C and B-6.
-How to use: the bulb, flowers, and green leaves are edible; can be cooked, grilled, roasted whole as a vegetable; chopped in salads, soups, and other dishes for flavor.
-How to store: refrigerate in damp towel/plastic bag for 5-7 days.

“Tantre Farm’s” POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 2 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!) and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container

“Tantre Farm’s” SPINACH:  crisp, dark green leaf; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron and a plethora of other nutrients and antioxidants. The appearance of spinach also marks the official beginning of spring!
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

“Wayward Seed Farm’s” GREEN CABBAGE:  This certified organic, late-season cabbage comes from Wayward Seed Farm (http://waywardseed.com). It is excellent for a wide variety of dishes and stores well into late winter.
-How to use:  steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store:  It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.  When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

“Zingerman’s Creamery” CREAM CHEESE:  a fresh, soft mild-tasting cheese with a slightly grassy tartness and smooth, soft texture made using old-world techniques with local milk.  Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use: good on bagels, crepe fillings, dips, frostings, soups, etc
-How to store: refrigerate for up to 1 or 2 weeks

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. TANTRE FARM’S SUMMER CSA IS SOLD OUT FOR 2020!!  If you were interested in our 18-week Summer CSA (which will start the week of May 24-30), we have had an overwhelming response and had to close early, since we had no more room.  If you are interested, please email us at info@tantrefarm.com to be put on a Waiting List, in case someone cancels and since we are figuring out the logistics of creating an alternate CSA.  More details will be coming soon about the Summer CSA and the possibility of a new CSA.  The hours of our days are very full indeed with farming and lots of computer work!

2. SHARE PARTNERS NEEDED:  Many former members did not get into the Summer CSA, because it sold out very early.  If any of you who are already registered for the Summer CSA were considering alternating weeks or splitting a share with a share partner, please let us know, because someone who couldn’t get in would probably be very grateful to be your share partner.   Please let us know by letting us know your current pick up location.

3. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

4. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order with your phone number.   Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

5. WEEKLY “IMMUNE BOOSTER” #9 NEXT WEEK: If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please register for a new weekly share every Monday evening, since our community partners change or their contributions may change weekly.  Watch for slight changes to the Immune Booster CSA in the coming weeks!

6. FARMERS MARKETS OPENING: Several local farmers markets, including the Ann Arbor and Chelsea Farmers Markets are opening  finally with limited hours, online stores, and curbside pickup this Mother’s Day weekend, but no table displays for the first few weeks.  Please support our friends by ordering and buying from them and of course wear masks and gloves.  We will not be participating at the markets with this method for right now, so please support us at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops, or Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea, and also by supporting our weekly shares.  We appreciate you!

7.  SEEDLINGS FOR SALE:  Our good friends at Frog Holler Organic Farm (Brooklyn, MI) have certified organic plant starts available for online ordering through froghollerorganic.com with home delivery options and Ann Arbor pick up locations, such as at the Ann Arbor Farmers Farmers Market.  Also our community partner, Goetz Greenhouse and Family Farm (Riga, MI) also has vegetable and flower seedlings for sale through their online store at https://www.sites.google.com/site/goetzgreenhouse.  They have pick up options at the Washtenaw Food Hub and Tantre Farm and the Ann Arbor and Chelsea Farmers Markets, so please contact them soon if you want to get your fingers in the dirt.  Happy gardening!

8.  FOR ANYONE INTERESTED IN A REAL TREAT:  If you want to see Tantre farmers in our younger days, including David from the Brinery, some of our CSA members (maybe you!), Ariana as a 4 year old CSA farmer, and many others CSA farmers from 2006, please watch this 25 minute video clip pulled out of the archives from our friends Marty and Michelle, who biked 900-miles around Michigan to visit CSA farms to collect stories, wisdom, and insight about food and connections that is ironically relevant especially  today.  Enjoy!   https://youtu.be/iCapC_bpvk4

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!  Lots and lots of ideas!

BEET KVASS DRESSING (https://m.lovingearth.net/blog/blog/2014/12/24/beet-kvass-dressing)
**Dress a simple salad or drizzle over roasted veggies and sprinkle with za’atar for a satisfying earthy meal.
3 tbsp Fermented Beet Kvass
1 tbsp tahini
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp olive oil
salt and pepper
Combine all the ingredients in a small jar and shake well until combined. You may need to add extra olive oil if the consistency is too thick.

SPINACH AND ASPARAGUS FRITTATA  (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)  Serves 4
Filling:
1 bunch spinach, washed and drained, with stems removed
1 lb asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 cloves garlic or  2 green onions, minced or mashed
Egg mixture:
8 eggs, beaten
3 Tbsp whipping cream or water
1/4 tsp salt
Pepper, to taste
2 Tbsp Parmesan cheese, shredded (optional)
Olive oil, to coat skillet
  Preheat broiler.  Mix ingredients well and pour into a greased 8-inch skillet and stir until set (about 5 minutes).  Place under broiler for 2 minutes until top is golden brown.  Cut into slices.

 ASPARAGUS-LEEK RISOTTO (from Better Homes and Gardens, April 2008)  Serves 4
3/4 lb asparagus spears, trimmed
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 1/2 cups sliced leeks (OR green onions)
1 cup Arborio rice
3 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth (maybe Ginger Deli’s Chicken Soup)
2 Tbsp snipped fresh parsley
1/2 tsp finely shredded lemon peel
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp freshly ground coarse black pepper
Lemon slices
Lemon peel
Place asparagus in single layer on baking sheet.  Brush with 1 tablespoon olive oil; lightly sprinkle salt and black pepper.  Bake, uncovered, in 450 degree oven about 10 minutes or until crisp-tender.  Cool slightly.  Cut two-thirds into 2-inch pieces, set aside all asparagus.  Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, cook leeks in remaining olive oil until tender.  Stir in uncooked rice.  Cook and stir over medium heat about 5 minutes or until rice begins to turn a golden brown.  In another saucepan bring broth to boiling.  Reduce heat and simmer.  Carefully stir 1 cup of hot broth into rice mixture.  Cook, stirring frequently, over medium heat until liquid is absorbed.  Then add 1/2 cup broth at a time, stirring frequently until broth is absorbed before adding more broth (about 22 minutes).  Stir in any remaining broth.  Cook and stir just until rice is tender and creamy.  Stir in asparagus pieces, cheese, parsley, lemon peel, lemon juice, and pepper.  Top with asparagus spears, lemon slices, and peel.

CARROT-MUSHROOM LOAF (from Moosewood Cookbook)  Serves 4.
1 cup chopped onion
4 1/2 cups grated carrots
1 lb chopped mushrooms
5 eggs
2 cloves garlic
1 cup fresh whole wheat breadcrumbs (dry out or toast Raterman’s sourdough bread and turn into breadcrumbs)
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
1/4 cup butter
Salt, pepper, basil and thyme, to taste
Crush garlic into melting butter.  Add onions and mushrooms and saute until soft.  Combine all ingredients (saving half the breadcrumbs and cheese for the top).  Season to taste.   Spread into buttered baking pan.  Sprinkle with remaining breadcrumbs and cheese.  Dot with butter.  Bake at 350 for 30 minutes covered, then uncover for an additional 5 minutes.  

CABBAGE-TOPPED TARRAGON POTATOES (adapted from http://www.food.com)  Serves 4
1 1/2 cups potatoes, peeled and chopped
1/2 cup cabbage, shredded
2 eggs, beaten
2 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp flour
1 tsp onions (or 1 green onion), minced
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp fresh tarragon, minced
1 tsp garlic, minced
1/8 tsp pepper
1/2 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
Plain yogurt (or Cream Cheese)
Fresh chives, snipped
Cook potatoes, covered in boiling salted water until tender; drain and mash (should yield about 1 1/3 cups).  Cook cabbage, covered, in small amount of boiling water for 5 minutes, until tender; drain.  In a bowl, combine eggs, margarine or butter, flour and seasonings.  Add the potatoes; beat until smooth.  Generously grease four 6 ounce oven-proof custard cups; spooning 1/3 cup mixture into each.  Top each bowl with cabbage and cheese.  Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.  Serve with yogurt and chives.

EASY CHEESY ASPARAGUS SPINACH DIP (https://peasandcrayons.com/2015/05/easy-cheesy-asparagus-spinach-dip.html)  Makes 3 cups.
1 bunch asparagus
3 cloves garlic
5-6 oz cream cheese (softened)
2/3 cup parmesan cheese coarsely grated + packed
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/4-1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp onion powder
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp paprika (optional)
5 oz fresh spinach
1-2 tsp olive oil
2-3 oz grated or sliced mozzarella cheese
parsley, parmesan, and red pepper flakes to garnish
Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees F.  Trim and rinse your asparagus stalks, then blanch or steam until tender.
In a food processor, combine asparagus, garlic, cream cheese, and parm cheese along with your garlic powder, onion powder, red pepper flakes, salt and paprika. Blend until creamy and smooth.  In a well-seasoned cast iron skillet, sauté an entire package of spinach with a little bit of olive oil, then add your asparagus dip.  Fold together and top with fresh mozzarella [or try gouda!] and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until hot and bubbly.  Garnish with your favorites [parsley, part, red pepper flakes, etc), or add pea/sunflower shoots.

ROASTED ASPARAGUS-CARROT-SPINACH SOUP (https://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=1865971)
1 bunch of Asparagus 
3-4 Carrots (peeled & sliced length-wise)
2 cups of Spinach
2 cloves of Garlic
Water – to make vegetable stock (or Ginger Deli Soup)
Milk (or alternative milk)- about 2 cups 
Salt & Pepper to taste
Other spices you wish to add
Begin by cutting bottom ends off asparagus (don’t throw away).  Peel the carrots (reserve the peels).  Place asparagus & carrots on tray to roast in oven – set @ 450 for appx. 20 minutes, carrots cooked about 5 minutes longer.  Place the asparagus ends, carrot peels, and garlic in pot. Cover with water and season to taste. Bring to boil, then simmer appx. 20 minutes. This will make your stock.   Combine veggies & splash of stock in blender and begin blending. Add more stock & milk as needed to your taste and continue to blend to the consistency you desire. I returned to the pot & cooked/kept warm on the stove & added seasoning here. 

Immune Booster Week 7, May 2, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 7) SHARE
May 2, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 7) SHARE!
Many beds of produce are planted just south of the maple trees soaking up the last two days of rain showers and finally drying out to be warmed by the beltane sun.  We are halfway to the Summer Solstice, and what delightful weather to celebrate the greening of the earth! The blooming of the fruit trees and early strawberries has just begun.  We have enjoyed the cool nights and days to plant delicate, “cold weather” seedlings of lettuce, kale, broccoli, leeks, peas, fava beans, green onions, and even summer squash.  It is good to work together laying out the long rows with precise distance between each row, as it meanders along the contours of the little hills down to the creek.  Mornings, afternoons, and all day long, small clusters of our crew spread out along the garden beds planting each seedling in hopes of an early spring feast.  What are the expectations for the season?  What are our hopes and fears for the next season?  Collectively we will continue to work together to share the harvest between all the friends and families in this community of eaters.

It is with these first days of May that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Kapnick Orchards, Wayward Seed Farm, Second Spring Farm, Greenfield Noodle & Specialty Co., and Goetz Family Farm.  As always thank you to our hardworking crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Annie, Andy, Geoff, Jbird, Ryan, and Chizo,  who continue to pull these shares together for you!  Also, if by some chance you notice that you are missing items from your share at any time, please let us know, since some of our crew are volunteering to work 12-14 hours on Fridays to make up these share boxes for you, and sometimes we make mistakes, because of the long day.  We can usually substitute something else or sometimes the same thing the following week if needed, so just let us know.

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now, except for those of you willing to drop your boxes off at the Food Hub or the Farm.   From our research, the virus does not last for more than 24 hours on cardboard, but there are so many unknowns about it, that we are thinking it is the best option for now.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for assistance, if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we may delay in entering check payments. We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time in the next few weeks.  If you paid with PayPal or Venmo, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in a labeled Payment Bag.  WE ARE STILL MISSING THE NAME OF SOMEONE WHO PAID $85 CASH IN AN UNLABELED ENVELOPE FOR IMMUNE BOOSTER CSA – WEEK 4!!!  We have also recently acquired VENMO, so if you have that app, please feel free to send money that way to @Deb-Lentz, with 6748 as the last four numbers of the phone number. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so that we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  Also, if you have time to support or thank the businesses that are helping us provide you with convenient Pick Up Locations, please express your gratitude to ROOSROAST in Ann Arbor, PURE PASTURES in Plymouth, and AGRICOLE FARM STOP in Chelsea.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy with so many wonderful partners in our community.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for a happy spring!              
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s” SEA STAG SAUERKRAUT:   This nutrient dense kraut preserves the energies of the land and the sea with green cabbage, carrots, burdock root, seaweed (digitata, alaria, kelp), turmeric, filtered water, sea salt.  Eat with everything!  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, such as tacos and other meat dishes, roasted vegetables, sandwiches, and salads.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED and will last up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor.

“The Brinery’s” TEMPEH:  a traditional Indonesian soy product, that is made from fermented soybeans. The Brinery’s tempeh is made with non gmo organic soybeans, and is an excellent source of protein and fiber; contains some B vitamins which we need to help us break down and get energy from our food, as well as support our nervous system, and a good selection of minerals including calcium, magnesium and phosphorus and zinc. “THE BLACK SPOTTING IS NORMAL, SAFE, AND DELICIOUS!  It’s also a HARMLESS sign of a fully ripened tempeh”.  Please click https://keepitvegan.com/vegan-quick-tips/how-to-tell-if-tempeh-has-gone-bad/ for a really helpful link to give you further information about tempeh with pictures and descriptions and recipes.
-How to use:  good sauteed, fried, crumbled as a taco filling and on salads, great on sandwiches such as a tempeh reuben, and as your center of the plate protein main course for any meal! See the Recipe section for a very good, easy way to make tempeh as a salty, tasty treat to add to any dish: eggs, soup, sandwiches, salads, etc.
-How to store: Thawed tempeh should be used within 5 days in your refrigerator.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA OR SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive 1 /4 pound of pea or sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, top on egg dish, or sandwiches,  excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Ginger Deli’s” KOHLRABI SALAD: **This will probably be the last week of this salad, since the Giant Kohlrabi are finally almost used up!  This salad is 100% vegan and gluten free.  It can also be nut-free, if you choose not to add the crushed peanuts and dried shallot cup.   This salad is featuring Tantre Farm’s shredded kohlrabi, carrot, daikon radish, and a pickled  watermelon-radish rose or carrot, along with shredded green papaya and a dash of cilantro, mint, chives, and mango with a dressing in a separate cup of water, lime, minced garlic, chili flakes, vinegar, and Northern Michigan maple  syrup.  This salad is created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea.
-How to use: when ready to use, take dressing out of cup and toss with shredded vegetables and top with cup of nuts and shallots
-How to store: keep in refrigerator for 5 days

“Ginger Deli’s” CABBAGE VEGGIE MEDLEY with RICE NOODLES (does have EGG!): You will receive a 16 oz container of this all vegetarian/gluten-free dish that features Wayward Seed Farm cabbage, shredded Tantre baby carrots, bean sprouts, red onion, garlic, sweet chives, maple syrup, tofu, egg strips, the Brinery tempeh, and rice noodles.  Serve with a side of crushed peanuts and chili sauce packed in separate containers.  This savory collaboration are  compliments from Ginger Deli!  See above for description of Ginger Deli.
-How to use:  reheat with bread or rice
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to 7 days or freeze

“Goetz Family Farm’s LETTUCE: a leafy, herbaceous annual grown mostly for salad, but especially delicious at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C
How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups.
How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” BOK CHOY: written as bok choi, bak choy, or pac choi; a traditional stir-fry Asian green from China with a sweet and mild flavor; looks like white Swiss chard with the stems all attached at the bottom; considered a cool weather crop and part of the cabbage or turnip family.
-How to use: two vegetables in one–the leaves can be cooked like spinach, and the crisp stem can be eaten like celery or asparagus; excellent in stir-fries, soups, sauteed or eaten raw.
-How to store: store as you would any green–in a loose plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator for about a week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” FRESH DILL: softly delicate, feathery green leaves with a unique spicy green taste and light aroma; considered a good luck symbol by early Romans.
-How to use: goes well with fish, potatoes, beets, carrots, and yogurt sauces and also good in soups, omelets, seafood dishes, herring, salmon, potato salads, and steamed vegetables.
-How to store:  Fresh leaves can be kept in a plastic bag in the refrigerator or chop finely and mix with one tablespoon of water and freeze in ice cube trays and store cubes in plastic freezer bags

“Greenfield Noodle & Specialty Co.” BROAD EGG NOODLES: These Detroit homemade-style noodles are air-dried naturally and were recommended by one of our CSA members.  Egg noodles are a good source of many of the B vitamins.  Greenfield Noodle and Specialty Co. is a family owned business and was founded over 50 years ago.  Contact Kevin Michaels for more information at kevin@greenfieldnoodle.com.
-How to use: perfect for goulash, stroganoff or in soups!  Cook the noodles for 5 to 8 minutes in well-salted boiling water.
-How to store:  keeps well for 6-12 months in a zip-top plastic bag.

“Kapnick Orchard’s GOLDEN DELICIOUS APPLES: **This will be the last week of apples, since alas we have come to the bottom of the barrel!  This is a large, yellowish-green skinned cultivar and very sweet to the taste; a favorite for salads, apple sauce, and apple butter. Kapnick Orchards (http://www.kapnickorchards.com) supply apples and other products year-round at their farm market in Britton, MI.  They can also be found at the Argus Farm Stops and Agricole Farm Stop, the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, the Saline indoor Farmers Market, and 3 winter markets in Canton. For more information email kapnicks@tc3net.com.
-How to use: good for snacking, salads, apple sauce, and also baking
-How to store: can be stored for several months in the refrigerator

“Second Spring Farm’s” RAINBOW CARROTS:   A carrot is a root, whose skin color can be white, red, purple, or yellow, but more commonly know for their bright orange color; high in all kinds of various nutrients based on their color.  Thanks to our former intern (2003)-turned-farmer, Reid Johnston, of Second Spring Farm (www.secondspringfarm.net). He is providing you with his certified organic carrots from Cedar, MI.
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

“Second Spring Farm’s” SHALLOTS:  You will receive these bulbs that look like an onion, but rather with a teardrop shape and reddish, copper skin and white interior;   flavor is described by some as combining the best of onion with garlic.
-How to use: essential in gourmet cooking, for sauces, soups, dressings, side dishes, and casseroles.
-How to store:  store in a cool, dark area from 45 to 55 degrees; if  not available than refrigerate  for longer shelf life.

“Tantre Farm’s” POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 4 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container

“Wayward Seed Farm’s” GREEN CABBAGE:  This certified organic, late-season cabbage comes from Wayward Seed Farm (http://waywardseed.com). It is excellent for a wide variety of dishes and stores well into late winter.
-How to use:  steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store:  It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.  When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

“Zingerman’s Creamery” FRESH BRIE CHEESE: a small, bloomy-rind  cheese with a buttery, mushroomy, almost meaty taste at the end.  Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use:  Great with a good crusty loaf of bread and with fresh apples or pears; a good match with walnuts, hazelnuts, or almonds.
-How to store: refrigerate for up to 14 weeks.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. SUMMER CSA IS SOLD OUT FOR 2020!!  If you were interested in our 18-week Summer CSA, we have had an overwhelming response and had to close early, since we had no more room.  If you are interested, please email us at info@tantrefarm.com to be put on a Waiting List, in case someone cancels or we figure out a way to do an alternate CSA or add more to the list.

2. SHARE PARTNER NEEDED:  Many former members did not get into the Summer CSA, because it sold out very early.  If any of you who are already registered for the Summer CSA were considering alternating weeks or splitting a share with a share partner, please let us know, because someone who couldn’t get in would probably be very grateful to be your share partner.   Please let us know by letting us know your current pick up location.

3. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

4. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order with your phone number.   Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

5. WEEKLY “IMMUNE BOOSTER” MULTIFARM SHARE EACH WEEK: If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please register for a new weekly share every Monday evening, since our community partners change or their contributions may change weekly.  

6.  SEEDLINGS FOR SALE:  Our good friends at Frog Holler Organic Farm (Brooklyn, MI) have certified organic plant starts available for online ordering through froghollerorganic.com with home delivery options and possible Ann Arbor pick up locations, as well as pick up at Tantre Farm.  Also our community partner, Goetz Greenhouse and Family Farm (Riga, MI) also has vegetable and flower seedlings for sale through an online store at  https://www.sites.google.com/site/goetzgreenhouse.  Both farms may have pick up options at the Washtenaw Food Hub and Tantre Farm and possible other locations, such as farmers markets in the near future, so please contact them soon if you want to get your fingers in the dirt.  Happy gardening!

RECIPES

BEET, CABBAGE, AND APPLE SLAW (from Washington Post, October
19, 2011) Makes 5 cups or 6-7 servings
1-2 medium (12 oz) beets, cut into chunks
2 medium (about 1 lb) Kapnick apples, cored, cut into chunks
1/2 head (about 2 cups) cabbage, shredded
3 Tbsp champagne vinegar
1 Tbsp agave syrup (or other sweetener)
1 Tbsp Dijon-style mustard
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
10 stems fat-leaf parsley, coarsely chopped, (1/2 cup packed)

Use a box grater or a food processor to coarsely shred the
chunks of beet and apples and place in a large bowl. Add the
shredded cabbage to the bowl. Whisk together the vinegar, agave
syrup, mustard and salt in a liquid measuring cup or small bowl.
Whisk in the oil and pour the dressing over the beet-cabbage
mixture and toss to coat thoroughly. Sprinkle the parsley over it all.
Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days. Serve chilled. Optonal:
Garnish with Pea or Sunflower Shoots and add the Brinery’s sauerkraut.

BBQ SRIRACHA TEMPEH WITH BLACK RICE (http://foodfitnessfreshair.com/2013/05/31/bbq-sriracha-tempeh-with-black-rice)  Serves 4.
1/3 cup ketchup
1/4 tsp. cumin
1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp. honey
2 Tbsp. soy sauce
1 tsp. lime juice
3 Tbsp. Sriracha
2 1/2 Tbsp. shallots, minced
1 (8 oz. package) tempeh
1 1/3 cup black rice + 2 3/4 cup water
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped

Place rice and water in a medium pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low simmer and cook 45-50 minutes, until rice is soft.  Meanwhile, fill pan with 3-4 cups of water. Bring to a simmer, add tempeh, and let simmer for 20-30 minutes.  Meanwhile, place remaining ingredients in a bowl. Whisk until combined.  Strain tempeh, and cool just until able to handle. Cut tempeh rectangle in half widthwise to make two squares. Slice each square into six strips to make a total of 12 strips. Place in BBQ Sriracha sauce, and let marinade for 30 minutes.  Preheat oven to 400F. Line baking sheet with aluminum foil, and spray with cooking oil or lightly grease with oil. Place tempeh in a single layer, and pour remaining sauce on top.  Bake 25-35 minutes, until sauce begins to brown. Portion out black rice. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and lightly season with salt and pepper. Place tempeh strips on top, and add chopped cilantro.

HEARTY, HEALTHY POTATO SOUP (https://food52.com/recipes/25446-hearty-healthy-potato-soup)  Serves 4 or 5.
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
6 cloves garlic
1 shallot
2 small yellow onions
4 cups filtered water
5 small potatoes
2 tablespoons dried parsley flakes
1 tablespoon dried thyme
1 tablespoon dried sage
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon dill weed
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 dash cayenne pepper
2 bay leaves, whole
1 large carrot
1/2 to 1 cups whole milk (or alternative milk), room temp
sea salt
green onion
1 chicken breast, cooked (optional)

Heat a large pot over medium heat. Smash your garlic cloves and roughly chop. Finely chop your shallots. Add both to the hot EVOO and let sautee a few minutes until they begin to soften.   Chop your onion and add to the pot. Sprinkle with some sea salt. Let everything continue to cook over the medium heat until it has softened and the onions have begun to sweeten.  Add your water and crank the heat up to high.  Cut your potatoes into halves and then each halve into quarters. Once your water is boiling, add your potatoes along with all the spices and the two bay leaves to the pot.  Give everything a few good stirs and let rapidly simmer for ten minutes.  Slice the large carrot very thinly. Add to the pot. Let everything continue to rapidly simmer until it is very soft, another ten minutes.  Turn off the heat and let cool down a little for five minutes. Remove your bay leaves and discard. Blend soup with a hand-immersion blender until smooth.  Add half cup of whole milk to the pot and blend. Check consistency and add up to a half cup more until you reach desired creaminess/thickness.  Ladle into a bowl.  Sprinkle a little sea salt over and then top with a little mound of chopped chicken breast. Garnish with some chopped green onion and Garden Works pea and sunflower shoots.

PORK TENDERLOIN STUFFED WITH BRIE AND MUSHROOMS (https://www.food.com/recipe/pork-tenderloin-stuffed-with-brie-and-mushrooms-410227)  Serves 6.
2 pork tenderloin (well trimmed, about 12 oz. each)
2 tablespoons  butter
1 garlic clove(minced)
2 shallots (chopped)
1 1/2 cups  mushrooms(white and cremini, sliced)
2 cups  fresh spinach (or Swiss Chard or Bok Choy)
2 tablespoons  red wine
0.5 (125 g) package brie cheese (chopped)
1/2 apple (with peel, chopped)
2 tablespoons walnuts (toasted, chopped)
1 teaspoon  dried thyme
salt and pepper
canola oil

Using a sharp knife, cut each pork tenderloin lengthwise, be careful not to slice right through the bottom. Open and flatten each loin and then set them aside. Heat butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Saute garlic, shallots and mushrooms. Add the spinach and saute briefly. Add the red wine and scrape up any browned bits. Remove from heat and add Brie, apple, walnuts and thyme.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  When it is cool enough to work with spoon 1/2 of the stuffing onto each loin. Fold over to enclose the stuffing. Tie to secure.  Brush very lightly with Canola oil.  Roast at 375F (190C) for 25-30 minute until a meat thermometer registers 155F (68C).  Remove from oven and tent loosely with foil. Let rest for 5 minutes. Remove string and slice to serve.  Serve with Sauerkraut.

FETTUCCINE WITH ESCAROLE AND BRIE (https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a3640/fettuccine-escarole-brie-recipe-8826)  Serves 4.
3/4 lb. fettuccine (or Greenfield’s Egg Noodles)
2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 oz. thinly sliced pancetta or bacon (optional)
1 clove garlic
1 shallot
1 lb. escarole (or Bok Choy)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1/2 lb. Brie (preferably a wedge)

In a large pot of generously salted boiling water, cook the pasta until just al dente. Drain the pasta, reserving 1 1/4 cups of the cooking water.  Meanwhile, in a very large skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the pancetta and cook over high heat, stirring, until lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and shallot and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the escarole, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring, just until wilted.  Add the pasta to the skillet along with 1 cup of the reserved pasta cooking water. Tear the Brie into 1-inch pieces and add to the skillet.  Cook the pasta over moderate heat, tossing, until the Brie is melted and the sauce is thick and creamy, about 4 minutes; add more of the pasta cooking water if the sauce is dry. Season the pasta with salt and pepper. Transfer the pasta to bowls and serve immediately.

BOK CHOY FISH NOODLE SOUP
1 1/2 lbs cod or haddock
1/2 lb Greenfield’s egg noodles
8 cup stock
1 cup orange juice
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup dry sherry
1/2 cup grated ginger
1 carrot, cut in small pieces
1/2 red bell pepper, julienned
2 cup bok choy, chopped
3 scallions, thinly sliced

Cook noodles until al dente.  Drain and set aside.  In a large saucepan, combine stock, orange juice, soy sauce, lemon juice, and sherry.  Bring to boil and add ginger, carrot, and bell pepper.  Simmer 3 minutes.  Add bok choy and simmer 3 minutes.  Remove vegetables and set aside.  Simmer fish in broth 5 minutes.  Place noodles in individual soup bowls.  Add layer of vegetables.  Add serving of fish.  Cover with soup broth.  Top with scallions and garnish with Garden Works pea or sunflower shoots.

Immune Booster Week 6, April 25, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 6) SHARE
April 25, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 6) SHARE!

Every year around this time, the wild nettles emerge with the cool, spring rains.  The light-frosted soil forms soft and moist beneath our feet, allowing the nettles a chance to push their purple and green, tooth-edged leaves skyward.  These are one of the first wild, spring greens that we can eat.  In historic times, there is evidence of nettles in a tomb from the Bronze Age.  Also during Neolithic times, it was discovered that the nettle stem was used to make string.  In fact, during the first World War, the uniforms of the German army were made out of the strong fibers of nettle.

Nettles are one of the wild “super foods” that awaken the gut flora and support our immune systems.  They are also renowned for their astringent, expectorant, tonic, anti-inflammatory, and diuretic properties and are an important source of beta-carotene, vitamins A, C, and E, iron, calcium, phosphates, and minerals.   They are known as a powerful remedy against arthritic and rheumatic conditions, and an aid in treating allergies, anemia, and kidney diseases.  The “sting” is eliminated quite easily by heating it or pulverizing it in pesto.  Some folks even prefer the sting applied directly to their joints to aid in easing more profound rheumatic pains. On the farm we use nettles as a tea in strengthening our immune system against colds and flu especially in the winter. Nettles have commonly been useful in eliminating viruses and bacterial infections.

These emerging stinging needles are not quite strong enough to sting much at this time of year, so this is the best moment to harvest them.  For a few weeks it is one of the most nutritious spring greens that can be foraged after many months of winter fasting of greens.  They can be found in old abandoned barnyards, along the edges of overgrown driveways, in the meadows, along creek beds, and often even in disturbed sites.  The initial surge of life comes from cool, black soil, rich in organic matter.  Nettles are life in abundance, almost unimaginably abundant (especially in old manure piles!).  Eventually the mature stems can reach six or eight feet tall coming back year after year.  It is one of the first greens of any quantity for drying leaves for later winter tea or using fresh as a delicious spring pesto.  Nettles can also be used in soups, sauteed greens, and in egg dishes like omelets or frittatas, and substituted in any recipe that requires a cooking green.   Once you get used to looking for it, you see it in so many places.  It is a hopeful bounty to add to our daily nutrition or to the periodic remedies we may choose.

It is with the hope of spring and good bye to winter that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Kapnick Orchards, Carol’s Brookside Blueberries, Wayward Seed Farm, Second Spring Farm, and Goetz Family Farm.  As always thank you to our hardworking crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Annie, Andy, Geoff, Jbird, Ryan, Zoe, and Chizo,  who continue to pull these shares together for you!  Also, if by some chance you notice that you are missing items from your share at any time, please let us know, since some of our crew are volunteering to work 12-14 hours on Fridays to make up these share boxes for you, and sometimes we make mistakes, because of the long day.  We can usually substitute something else or sometimes the same thing the following week if needed, so just let us know.

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now, except for those of you willing to drop your boxes off at the Food Hub or the Farm.  We do not want to transport any boxes from any location until it has sat for about a week.  From our research, the virus does not last for more than 24 hours on cardboard, but there are so many unknowns about it, that we are thinking it is the best option for now.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for assistance, if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we may delay in entering check payments. We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time in the next few weeks.  If you paid with PayPal or Venmo, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in a labeled Payment Bag.  WE ARE STILL MISSING THE NAME OF SOMEONE WHO PAID $85 CASH IN AN UNLABELED ENVELOPE FOR WEEK 3!!!  We have also recently acquired VENMO, so if you have that app, please feel free to send money that way to @Deb-Lentz, with 6748 as the last four numbers of the phone number. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so that we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  Also, if you have time to support or thank the businesses that are helping us provide you with convenient Pick Up Locations, please express your gratitude to ROOSROAST in Ann Arbor, PURE PASTURES in Plymouth, and AGRICOLE FARM STOP in Chelsea.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy with so many wonderful partners in our community.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for more sunshine!              
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s”  STORM CLOUD ZAPPER SAUERKRAUT:   This crunchy, tangy, zappy kraut includes the simple ingredients of green cabbage, red beets, fresh ginger, filtered water, and sea salt.  Eat with everything!  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, such as tacos and other meat dishes, roasted vegetables, sandwiches, and salads.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED and will last up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor.

CAROL’S BROOKSIDE FROZEN BLUEBERRIES:  Blueberries are known for their many nutritional benefits, especially supporting heart health.  Considered a “super food” and known for their antioxidants and phytoflavinoids, they are known to help lower the risks of heart disease and cancer. You may have seen Carol selling frozen or fresh blueberries at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or lately on 4th Avenue.  We now are offering you a pint of her frozen blueberries from Adrian, MI, where she sometimes has u-pick blueberries available in July.  You can reach her at 517-403-0028.
-How to use: delicious in smoothies, fruit crisps, topped on oatmeal or cereal, or just eaten as a snack.  As a delicious, quick frozen dessert, add milk and maple syrup just to cover frozen blueberries and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes until milk freezes; then stir and eat!
-How to store: Keep frozen until ready for use or keep for 1-2 days thawed in refrigerator.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA OR SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive 1 /4 pound of pea or sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, top on egg dish, or sandwiches,  excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Ginger Deli’s” KOHLRABI SALAD: This salad is 100% vegan and gluten free.  It can also be nut-free, if you choose not to add the crushed peanuts and dried shallot cup.   This salad is featuring Tantre Farm’s shredded kohlrabi, carrot, daikon radish, and a pickled  watermelon-radish rose or carrot, along with shredded green papaya and a dash of cilantro, mint, chives, and mango with a dressing in a separate cup of water, lime, minced garlic, chili flakes, vinegar, and Northern Michigan maple  syrup.  This salad is created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea.
-How to use: when ready to use, take dressing out of cup and toss with shredded vegetables and top with cup of nuts and shallots
-How to store: keep in refrigerator for 5 days

“Ginger Deli’s” CABBAGE ENERGY BALLS: You will receive a 16 oz container of this all vegan/gluten-free dish that features lightly battered and roasted cabbage balls in a savory sauce topped with roasted cherry tomato and crunchy tempeh bits.  Ingredients include: Wayward Seed cabbage, Tantre baby potatoes, olive oil, coconut milk, garlic, onion, Michigan maple syrup, crushed tomato, Vietnamese curry, cumin, and thyme.  These savory energy balls are  compliments from Ginger Deli!  See above for description.
-How to use:  reheat with bread or rice
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to 7 days or freeze

“Goetz Family Farm’s LETTUCE: a leafy, herbaceous annual grown mostly for salad, but especially delicious at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C
How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups.
How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” BRIGHT LIGHTS SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor with slight sweetness at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; good source of vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron and calcium.
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.  

“Raterman Bread’s“  WHOLE WHEAT SOURDOUGH BREAD: This savory  sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives by fermentation of dough with naturally occurring lactobacilli and yeast making it more nutritious and easier to digest. Other varieties and sizes are available at Argus Farm Stops, Agricole Farm Stop, and on Saturdays at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.
-How to use: roast it with chicken, good as toast or sandwiches, use as a bread bowl for soup, make homemade croutons or stuffing, use as toast or on sandwiches
-How to store: lasts for 4 to 5 days at room temperature

“Kapnick Orchard’s GOLDEN DELICIOUS APPLES: a large, yellowish-green skinned cultivar and very sweet to the taste; a favorite for salads, apple sauce, and apple butter. Kapnick Orchards (http://www.kapnickorchards.com) supply apples and other products year-round at their farm market in Britton, MI.  They can also be found at the Argus Farm Stops and Agricole Farm Stop, the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, the Saline indoor Farmers Market, and 3 winter markets in Canton. For more information email kapnicks@tc3net.com.
-How to use: good for snacking, salads, apple sauce, and also baking
-How to store: can be stored for several months in the refrigerator

“Second Spring Farm’s” RAINBOW CARROTS:   A carrot is a root, whose skin color can be white, red, purple, or yellow, but more commonly know for their bright orange color; high in all kinds of various nutrients based on their color.  Thanks to our former intern (2003)-turned-farmer, Reid Johnston, of Second Spring Farm (www.secondspringfarm.net). He is providing you with his certified organic carrots from Cedar, MI.
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

“Second Spring Farm’s” SHALLOTS:  You will receive these bulbs that look like an onion, but rather with a teardrop shape and reddish, copper skin and white interior;   flavor is described by some as combining the best of onion with garlic.
-How to use: essential in gourmet cooking, for sauces, soups, dressings, side dishes, and casseroles.
-How to store:  store in a cool, dark area from 45 to 55 degrees; if  not available than refrigerate  for longer shelf life.

“Tantre Farm’s” POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 4 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container

“Wayward Seed Farm’s” GREEN CABBAGE:  This certified organic, late-season cabbage comes from Wayward Seed Farm (http://waywardseed.com). It is excellent for a wide variety of dishes and stores well into late winter.
-How to use:  steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store:  It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.  When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

“Zingerman’s Creamery” LINCOLN LOG GOAT CHEESE:  a dense, soft-ripened goat cheese. When young, the log is creamy, mild, and delicate with a hint of citrus and a touch of mushroom flavor. As it ages, the paste firms to a fudge-like texture with deeper flavor. Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use:  perfect with crackers or a slice of Whole Wheat  Sourdough Raterman Bread, excellent as a pizza topping or on salads
-How to store: refrigerate for up to 14 weeks.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. SUMMER CSA IS SOLD OUT FOR 2020!!  If you were interested in our 18-week Summer CSA, we have had an overwhelming response and had to close early, since we had no more room.  If you are interested, please email us at info@tantrefarm.com to be put on a Waiting List, in case someone cancels or we figure out a way to do an alternate CSA or add more to the list.

2. SHARE PARTNER NEEDED:  If you were interested in the Plymouth location at Pure Pastures, we do have a CSA member registered, who needs a share partner, so please let us know.  Also, if you are already signed at the Farm or Chelsea Farmers Market, we have someone interested in being someone’s share partner, so please let us know.

3. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  Harvest Kitchen wants to reassure their current and future customers that Harvest Kitchen complies with the highest sanitation standards throughout their production process and is a facility that is inspected by both the USDA and MDARD.  Also Harvest Kitchen will be shifting their focus and expanding their menu options during this critical time. They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

4. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, if you are interested in frozen USDA slaughtered beef, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order with your phone number.  In general, they will be sold in bulk or by the cut.  Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

5. WEEKLY “IMMUNE BOOSTER” MULTIFARM SHARE EACH WEEK: If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please watch for another email every Monday evening, since we are planning to continue providing you with healthy products with easy pick up as long as we are able.  If you are stocked up for the week or uninterested for now, please look for Tantre Farm and our partners on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, or on the Tantre Farm website.  Tantre Farm produce will continue to be available at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops of AA, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea  year-round, and eventually hopefully at the Chelsea and Ann Arbor Farmers Markets again this summer.

6.  SEEDLINGS FOR SALE:  Our good friends at Frog Holler Organic Farm (Brooklyn, MI) have certified organic plant starts available for online ordering through froghollerorganic.com with home delivery options and possible Ann Arbor pick up locations.  Also our community partner, Goetz Greenhouse and Family Farm (Riga, MI) also has vegetable and flower seedlings for sale through an online store at  https://www.sites.google.com/site/goetzgreenhouse.  Both farms may have pick up options at the Washtenaw Food Hub and Tantre Farm and possible other locations, such as farmers markets in the near future, so please contact them soon if you want to get your fingers in the dirt.  Happy gardening!

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!

KOREAN POTATO SALAD WITH APPLES (https://www.thespruceeats.com/korean-potato-salad-2118849)  Serves 6.
4 small to medium potatoes (peeled and cubed)
1 small carrot (cut into small chunks)
2 eggs, hard-boiled (yolks removed and cut into small chunks)
1/2 small cucumber (thinly sliced)
1/2 small yellow or sweet onion (thinly sliced and diced)
1 Kapnick’s apple (cut into small chunks)
3/4 cup mayonnaise
Optional: 1/4 cup ham or Canadian bacon (diced)
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste

Boil potatoes until tender, about 10 minutes. Add carrot (and eggs if not yet hard-boiled) for the last 8 minutes. While cooking, sprinkle salt on the cucumber and onion and let them sweat for about 10 minutes.  Remove potatoes and carrot (and eggs) and let cool. If necessary, cut egg whites into small chunks. Rinse cucumber and onion lightly and squeeze out excess water with paper towels. In a large bowl, add mayonnaise and all of the other ingredients and mix gently. Taste and add salt and pepper as   desired. Add slices or grated fresh Zingerman’s Goat Cheese. Serve as a side dish or as a sandwich filling with Raterman bread.

HONEY ROASTED CARROTS WITH GOAT CHEESE AND THYME (https://reciperunner.com/honey-roasted-carrots-goat-cheese-thyme/) Serves 4.
14 carrots, cut in half lengthwise then into approximately 2 inch long pieces
1 tablespoon olive oil
Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper
1 tablespoon of honey
2 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl toss together the carrots, olive oil, salt and pepper.  Dump the carrots out onto a rimmed baking sheet and spread them into a single layer.  Place the carrots in the oven and roast for 15 minutes.  Remove them from the oven, drizzle with the honey and toss to coat them.  Roast the carrots in the oven for another 10 or until slightly caramelized and softened. Place the roasted carrots on a serving platter and top with the crumbled goat cheese, thyme and another drizzle of honey. Serve immediately garnished with Garden Work’s Pea/Sunflower Shoots.

CARROT-YOGURT SALAD (from Moosewood Cookbook)
1 lb carrots, coarsely grated
2 medium apples, grated
1 cup firm yogurt
1 Tbsp honey
Pinch of celery seed
Juice from one small lemon
A few dashes each salt and pepper
Optional:
1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1/4 cup toasted sunflower seeds or almonds or cashews
1/2 cup finely minced celery
1/2 cup chopped fresh pineapple
Combine all ingredients, mix well and chill.

BLUEBERRY BALSAMIC GOAT CHEESE APPETIZER (https://www.thecreativebite.com/blueberry-balsamic-goat-cheese-appetizer)
1 c. blueberries fresh or frozen
2 tsp. honey add an extra teaspoon if your blueberries aren’t very sweet
2 tsp. balsamic vinegar
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4` scant tsp. crushed rosemary
4 oz. Zingerman’s goat cheese
2 oz. cream cheese
1 loaf crusty French bread ( or try Raterman Whole Wheat bread for a hearty substitute)
Add the blueberries to a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the rosemary, honey, salt and balsamic vinegar. Cook over medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Meanwhile, in a small bowl, beat the goat cheese and cream cheese together.
Spread the goat cheese mixture over a small plate and top with the blueberry mixture that has been allowed to cool for a few minutes. 
Serve the dip with some crusty French bread or crackers. 

SAUTÉED CABBAGE AND CARROTS WITH TURMERIC (https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/sauteed-cabbage-and-carrots-turmeric)
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 medium red onions or Shallots, finely chopped (2 cups)
Salt
10 garlic cloves, minced
One 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and minced
2 tablespoons ground turmeric
1 pound rainbow carrots, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1 1/2-inch lengths
5 pounds green cabbage, cored and cut into 3/4-inch pieces

In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, heat the olive oil. Add the onions and a generous pinch of salt and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 8 minutes. Add the garlic, ginger and turmeric and cook, stirring, until the vegetables are fragrant and just starting to brown, about 5 minutes.  Add the carrots to the casserole along with 1/2 cup of water and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until the carrots are just starting to soften, 7 minutes. Stir in the cabbage in large handfuls, letting each batch wilt slightly before adding more. When all of the cabbage has been added, cover and cook over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until the cabbage is tender, 40 to 45 minutes. Season with salt and serve.  The cooked cabbage can be refrigerated for up to 2 days. Reheat gently before serving.  Garnish with Garden Work’s Pea or Sunflower Shoots.

VEGETARIAN BEAN, SWISS CHARD AND LEMON SOUP  (from Polwig.com food blog)  Serves 6
2 cans of Cannellini Beans
4 cups vegetable stock
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 Carrots
2 celery stalks
1 onion or 1 Shallot
1 lb Potatoes
1 red pepper
1 lemon
Handful Fresh thyme
1 bunch Swiss Chard
1 Tbsp cumin
Dice the onion and celery (you can also add the leafy ends).  Clean the carrots, or scrape them and then cube.  On medium heat saute onions, celery and carrots with 1 tablespoon olive oil.  When they are cooking, dice the peppers add to the pot and cook while you roughly chop the chard and cut potatoes into edible slices or cubes.  When onions have become translucent and peppers a little softer add chard and potatoes.  Top with drained cannellini beans, 1 squeezed lemon (squeeze juice, and then quarter the lemon and cook with the soup) and a bunch of thyme. Add vegetable stock and cumin.   Bring to boil and simmer until the potatoes are soft.  Discard the lemons and serve warm.
Notes:  This soup also freezes really well so if you make a bigger batch you can have it as a pick me up for up to 3 months.  Delicious with Raterman’s bread or the Brinery’s sauerkraut!

Immune Booster Week 5, April 18, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 5) SHARE
April 18, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 5) SHARE!

I went out for a walk today, only to see what had lived.  Some things don’t mind the snow. Even in bloom I saw the daffodils were still yellow under the snow.  The grass was still green peeking up through the white crystals. There is the ticking, ticking of time that must be what shines through.  What season is this?   What are your hopes in the mud and the snow, in the gray skies and the cold wind that blows all day and all night tossing the darling buds that hope of spring.  Is this a new season?  What is this unseen wind that blows cold and then warm, world-round, that stirs the oceans and heaves the mountains, that moils the currents of the deepest oceans, that churns and turns and polishes and smooths the rough edges to flat until it all disappears into a grain of sand?

Strange to see a snowy April.  Some things shrivel. Some things cower. Some things stay true and strong.  So now, children of the earth, maybe since we have had a little snow, maybe that means that we can go out now to plant and play.  Let us find the hope, the faith, and the love for one another, despite the surprises of spring.   It is time now to come together. To work together.  To share the effort and the accomplishment.  To be tired. To seek rest. To feel hunger.  To eat a hearty meal with a good appetite.  To live close to one another and ourselves, despite social distancing. It is time to hold the world in a grain of sand and to see eternity in a flower.

It is with the acceptance of surprises that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Kapnick Orchards, and Goetz Family Farm.  Thanks to our hardworking crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Annie, Andy, Geoff, Jbird, Ryan, Zoe, and Chizo,  who continue to help pull these shares together for you!  Also, if by some chance you notice that you are missing items from your share at any time, please let us know, since some of our crew are volunteering to work 12-14 hours on Fridays to pull your share together for you, and sometimes we make mistakes, because of the long day.  We can usually replace or substitute something else the following week if needed.

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now.  From our research, the virus does not last for more than 24 hours on cardboard, but there are so many unknowns about it, that we are thinking it is the best option for now.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for assistance, if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we may delay in entering check payments. We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time in the next few weeks.  If you paid with PayPal or Venmo, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in a labeled Payment Bag.  We have also recently acquired VENMO, so if you have that app, please feel free to send money that way to @Deb-Lentz, with 6748 as the last four numbers of the phone number. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so that we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  Also, if you have time to support or thank the businesses that are helping us provide you with convenient Pick Up Locations, please express your gratitude to ROOSROAST, PURE PASTURES, and AGRICOLE FARM STOP.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy with so many wonderful partners in our community.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for more sunshine!              
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s”  FAIR N’ BY SAUERKRAUT:   This purely traditional kraut includes the simple ingredients of cabbage, filtered water, and sea salt; a great gateway into traditionally fermented foods.  Eat with everything!  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, such as tacos and other meat dishes, roasted vegetables, sandwiches, and salads.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED and will last up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor.

“The Brinery’s” TEMPEH:  a traditional Indonesian soy product, that is made from fermented soybeans. The Brinery’s tempeh is made with non gmo organic soybeans, and is an excellent source of protein and fiber; contains some B vitamins which we need to help us break down and get energy from our food, as well as support our nervous system, and a good selection of minerals including calcium, magnesium and phosphorus and zinc. “THE BLACK SPOTTING IS NORMAL, SAFE, AND DELICIOUS!  It’s also a HARMLESS sign of a fully ripened tempeh”.  Please click https://keepitvegan.com/vegan-quick-tips/how-to-tell-if-tempeh-has-gone-bad/ for a really helpful link to give you further information about tempeh with pictures and descriptions and recipes.
-How to use:  good sauteed, fried, crumbled as a taco filling and on salads, great on sandwiches such as a tempeh reuben, and as your center of the plate protein main course for any meal! See the Recipe section for a very good, easy way to make tempeh as a salty, tasty treat to add to any dish: eggs, soup, sandwiches, salads, etc.
-How to store: Thawed tempeh should be used within 5 days in your refrigerator.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA OR SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive 1 /4 pound of pea or sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, top on egg dish, or sandwiches,  excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” BOK CHOY: written as bok choi, bak choy, or pac choi; a traditional stir-fry Asian green from China with a sweet and mild flavor; looks like white Swiss chard with the stems all attached at the bottom; considered a cool weather crop and part of the cabbage or turnip family.
-How to use: two vegetables in one–the leaves can be cooked like spinach, and the crisp stem can be eaten like celery or asparagus; excellent in stir-fries, soups, sauteed or eaten raw.
-How to store: store as you would any green–in a loose plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator for about a week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” BRIGHT LIGHTS SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor with slight sweetness at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; good source of vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron and calcium.
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.  

“Harvest Kitchen’s”   PURE MICHIGAN GRANOLA:  A granola style celebration of the diversity of the Michigan Bounty. Ferris Farms organic rolled oats, organic flax seeds and organic sunflower seeds with Traverse Bay Farms organic dried wild blueberries, and Lesser Farms Honey.  Harvest Kitchen (https://harvest-kitchen.com) produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale  at info@harvest-kitchen.com .
-How to use: mix with yogurt, salad topping, bake in bread or muffins, roll in bananas and freeze, toss it with oatmeal
-How to store:  Store for many days in an airtight container at room temperature.

“Raterman Bread’s“  ROSEMARY SOURDOUGH BREAD: This savory  sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives by fermentation of dough with naturally occurring lactobacilli and yeast making it more nutritious and easier to digest. Other varieties and sizes are available at Argus Farm Stops, Agricole Farm Stop, and on Saturdays at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.
-How to use: roast it with chicken, good as toast or sandwiches, use as a bread bowl for soup, make homemade croutons or stuffing, use as toast or on sandwiches
-How to store: lasts for 4 to 5 days at room temperature

“Kapnick Orchard’s APPLES: You will receive either Fuji (crisp, pale-ivory to white flesh, crunchy and low in acid, sweet-tart flavor with notes of honey and citrus; originally crossed between a Red Delicious and an old Virginia Rails Genet apple) or Golden Delicious (a large, yellowish-green skinned cultivar and very sweet to the taste; a favorite for salads, apple sauce, and apple butter). Kapnick Orchards (http://www.kapnickorchards.com) supply apples and other products year-round at their farm market in Britton, MI.  They can also be found at the Argus Farm Stops and Agricole Farm Stop, the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, the Saline indoor Farmers Market, and 3 winter markets in Canton. For more information email kapnicks@tc3net.com.
-How to use: good for snacking, salads, apple sauce, and also baking
-How to store: can be stored for several months in the refrigerator

“Zingerman’s Creamery” LIPTAUER CHEESE:  traditional umami flavored spreadable cheese comes from blending fresh Zingerman’s cream cheese with sweet and hot heirloom paprika from the Hodi family in Hungary, which is then hand blended with garlic, sea salt, capers, toasted caraway, and a touch of anchovy paste. Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use:  perfect with crackers or a slice of Rosemary Sourdough Raterman Bread; use as a dip with raw veggies
-How to store: refrigerate for up to 14 weeks.

“Ginger Deli’s” KOHLRABI SALAD: This salad is 100% vegan and gluten free.  It can also be nut-free, if you choose not to add the crushed peanuts and dried shallot cup.   This salad is featuring Tantre Farm’s shredded kohlrabi, carrot, daikon radish, and a pickled Tantre watermelon-radish rose or carrot, along with shredded green papaya and a dash of cilantro, mint, chives, and mango with a dressing in a separate cup of water, lime, minced garlic, chili flakes, vinegar, and Northern Michigan maple  syrup.  This salad is created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea.
-How to use: when ready to use, take dressing out of cup and toss with shredded vegetables and top with cup of nuts and shallots
-How to store: keep in refrigerator for 5 days

“Ginger Deli’s” TOFU/TEMPEH TOMATO BASIL ENTREE: You will receive a 16 oz container of this all vegetarian/vegan/gluten-free dish that has been cooked with frozen tomatoes from Tantre Farm, organic soft tofu, fresh basil, olive oil, garlic, grilled onion, green beans, sea salt, maple syrup, and the Brinery’s tempeh.  Very good farmer comfort food with compliments from Ginger Deli!
-How to use:  reheat with bread or rice
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to 7 days or freeze

“Tantre Farm’s” CARROTS:  You will receive 2 kinds of carrots in a plastic bag.  Chantenay (orange root that is shorter than some, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Napoli (a specialized orange variety with a sweet taste; 7” roots are cylindrical, smooth, and blunt with edible, green leaves).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

“Tantre Farm’s” POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 4 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container

“Tantre Farm’s” SPINACH: You will receive this crisp, hoop house grown, dark green leaf bunched in a bag; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron and a plethora of other nutrients and antioxidants. The appearance of spinach also marks the official beginning of spring!
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. SUMMER CSA 2020:  If you are interested in our 18-week Summer CSA, please sign up for $630 on our online registration at http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.   The first pick up begins the week of May 24-30.  The last week is Sept. 20-26.  If you need help finding share partners let us know, since we like to sometimes play “matchmaker” if we can.

2. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  Harvest Kitchen wants to reassure their current and future customers that Harvest Kitchen complies with the highest sanitation standards throughout their production process and is a facility that is inspected by both the USDA and MDARD.  Also Harvest Kitchen will be shifting their focus and expanding their menu options during this critical time. They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

3. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, if you are interested in frozen beef, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order.  In general, they will be sold in bulk or by the cut, since we have USDA slaughtered beef.  Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

4. WEEKLY “IMMUNE BOOSTER” MULTIFARM SHARE EACH WEEK: If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please watch for another email every Monday, since we are planning to continue providing you with healthy products with easy pick up as long as we are able.  If you are stocked up for the week or uninterested for now, please look for Tantre Farm and our partners on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, or on the Tantre Farm website.  Tantre Farm produce will continue to be available at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops of AA, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea  year-round, and eventually hopefully at the Chelsea and Ann Arbor Farmers Markets again this summer.

5.  FROG HOLLER ORGANIC FARM SEEDLINGS FOR SALE:  Our good friends at Frog Holler are trying to get the word out that they have organic  plant starts available for online ordering through froghollerorganic.com with pick up or delivery hopefully in the near future, so we are letting you know.  There is some debate about whether vegetable plant starts are deemed essential under these circumstances and uncertainty as to whether they will be allowed at all. If growing a garden is essential to your sense of food security, please consider contacting your state rep and MDARD to encourage them to allow the sale of vegetable plant starts this spring.  Happy gardening!

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!

SAUTEED TEMPEH (Richard’s recipe)
1 brick tempeh
2 Tbsp oil
2-4 Tbsp soy sauce, tamari, or Braggs Amino Acids
Heat oil in pan on medium to medium high heat. Slice the brick into quarter-inch slices. Saute in pan on one side until tempeh is golden brown.  Flip to other side and saute until slightly golden-brown.  Then drizzle or spray soy sauce onto each slice of tempeh.  Continue cooking until soy sauce is absorbed by the tempeh and there is no liquid left in the pan.  Remove from pan, and serve in a variety of ways: crumbled into salads, kept whole in slices of Raterman’s bread as a sandwich with other condiments, such as the Brinery’s sauerkraut, add to egg dishes, top soups with tempeh slices or crumbled.

TEMPEH REUBEN BOWLS **Thanks to Carisa Wilder for finding this recipe!  (https://www.heynutritionlady.com/tempeh-reuben-bowls/?fbclid=IwAR0W9T7UlAXX-Y4q1fmsEhxUNPEzCnimN6bW1PCH7B01XeDrS6RlfTXDLus) Serves 4.
2 x 200g package tempeh
1/2 cup vegetable broth or water
1 tsp dried oregano
2 garlic cloves crushed
1/3 cup soy sauce
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup red wine vinegar
1/3 cup red wine
1 tsp whole cloves
1/2 tsp cracked pepper
.
1/3 cup tahini paste
3 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup water more for a thinner sauce
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup sauerkraut or more if you like
2 medium beets peeled and grated
2 cups cooked whole grains (farro wheat berries, quinoa, or a mix)
4 cups leafy greens (Swiss Chard, Bok Choy, Spinach)
2 dill pickles sliced
To make the marinade, combine the broth, oregano, garlic, soy sauce, olive oil, red wine vinegar, red wine, cloves, and pepper in a small saucepan. Bring to the boil over medium heat, reduce, and simmer for 10 minutes. Slice the tempeh into cubes (or slabs if you’re making sandwiches) and place into a shallow bowl or container. Pour the marinade over the tempeh slices, cover, and refrigerate for one day or overnight.  You can make the lemony tahini sauce while the tempeh is marinating, and keep in the fridge overnight. Whisk together the tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, water, salt, and pepper. Set aside.  When you’re ready to bake the tempeh and make the bowls, preheat the oven to 200°C / 400°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicon baking mat. Strain the marinade off of the tempeh, and arrange the cubes on the baking sheets. Bake for 20-30 minutes, turing the cubes once halfway through. Remove the tempeh from the oven and set aside to cool. (But if you’re making a sandwich, use the tempeh hot!)
To assemble the Reuben bowls, divide the leafy greens amongst 4 bowls or lunch boxes. Add the tempeh, sauerkraut, grated beets, whole grains, and pickles.  If serving immediately, drizzle with a bit of tahini sauce. If packing for lunches, pack with a small container of sauce tucked alongside.  Top with Garden Works Pea or Sunflower Shoots.

SWISS CHARD CASSEROLE (from Master Cook)
2 cups brown rice, cooked
8 oz Swiss chard leaves, torn or chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
16 oz tomato-based sauce*
1 Tbsp tamari soy sauce
2 cup shredded Colby jack cheese
Mix all the ingredients together and place in greased casserole.  Cover.  Bake in preheated 350 degree oven until cheese is thoroughly melted, about 20 minutes.  This might mix nicely with Ginger Deli’s Tofu Tomato dish.  Notes: More cheese can be layered on top.  More sauce can also be used.  It’s very easy to make several casseroles at once when there is a lot of chard available, then wrap and freeze.  One recipe takes about 1 to 1 1/2 hours to cook when frozen.
*The following sauces have been used with good results: marinara, enchilada, arriabiata, various salsas.

GINGERED GREENS AND TOFU
Marinade:
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup sherry
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
3 Tbsp brown sugar
2 tofu cakes (approximately 1 1/2 lb) or the Brinery’s tempeh
1/4 cup peanut oil or vegetable oil
2 Tbsp grated fresh ginger
6 cups shredded greens (such as Swiss Chard, Bok Choy, Spinach )
3 Tbsp fresh lime juice
2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
Pinch cayenne or splash of chili oil
Toasted cashews or peanuts (optional)
Bring marinade ingredients to a boil in a small saucepan.  Simmer for 1 minute and remove from heat.  Cut tofu into 1-inch squares, 1/2-inch thick, sprinkle with 2 tablespoons oil and marinade for 5 minutes.  Prepare remaining ingredients.  Broil tofu for 7-8 minutes per side until lightly browned.  While tofu broils, heat 2 tablespoons oil in a wok or large skillet.  Stir in the ginger and add greens.  Stir constantly until the greens are heated through and wilted.  Add lime juice, cilantro and cayenne. Remove from heat.  Toss with tofu and marinade.  Top with nuts if desired.

CARROT SOUP (from Moosewood Cookbook)
2 lbs carrots, peeled or scrubbed and chopped
4 cups stock or water
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 cup chopped onion
1-2 small cloves crushed garlic
1/3 cup chopped cashews or almonds
1/4 cup butter
Optional:  
1 medium potato chopped (for heartier soup)
Bring carrots, stock or water, salt (and potato if desired) to a boil.  Cover and simmer 12-15 minutes.  Let cool to room temperature.  Saute the onion, garlic and nuts in 3-4 tablespoons butter and with a little salt, until onions are clear.  Puree everything together in a blender, until it is smooth.  Return the puree to a kettle or double boiler and whisk in ONE of the following: 1 cup milk, 1 cup yogurt or buttermilk plus a little honey, 1/2 pint heavy cream, 3/4 cup sour cream. Season with ONE of the following combinations: 2 pinches nutmeg, 1/2 teaspoon dried mint, dash of cinnamon, 1/2 to 1 teaspoon each of thyme, marjoram, and basil, 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger root, sauteed in butter plus a dash of sherry before serving.  Garnish with grated apple or toasted nuts or sour cream.

SPINACH APPLE SMOOTHIE (https://www.lifeisbutadish.com/spinach-apple-detox-smoothie/)
2–3 cups spinach (packed)
1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk
1 banana
1 Granny Smith apple, cored and cubed (or Kapnick apple)
1 cup chopped cucumber
4 dates
1 tablespoon flax seeds
Squeeze of lemon
Large handful of ice
OPTIONAL TOPPINGS: Shaved coconut (unsweetened), Chia seeds, or Hemp seeds, Garden Works Pea or Sunflower Shoots
Add the spinach, almond milk and banana to the blender and blend until combined. Add the apple, cucumber, dates, flax seeds, and lemon juice, and blend for 2-3 minutes until completely smooth. Add the ice and blend for another 30-60 seconds. Pour into two glasses and top with desired toppings. Serve immediately or store in the fridge for later!

BAKED POTATO FRIES (from The Maine Potato Catalog 2003)
1 lb  potatoes (all colors)
2 Tbsp salad oil
Salt, pepper, paprika, or rosemary to taste
Cut potatoes into skinny fries or thin wedges.  Toss potatoes with oil and seasonings.  Spread in a single layer on a cookie sheet.  Bake for 30-40 minutes (until tender and golden) in a 425 degree oven.

Immune Booster Week 4, April 11, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 4) SHARE
April 11, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 4) SHARE!
The cool April rains have kept the earth muddy and moist for the young seeds to sprout.  The onion, the mustard, the peas, and the strawberry buds are all thrusting from the soil towards the emerging beltane sun.  In less than three weeks we will celebrate May Day, the festival of mid spring, and see the last of the frosty nights.  This year, like every other year, the farmers all over this state are preparing for an exponential harvest from this fertile place between the Great Lakes, anticipating a hopeful harvest of abundance to share.  It is in that sharing that we are helpful to one another.  We are helpful as person to person and as good friends to all plants and animals of our biosphere to celebrate the interdependence of all things great and small. Some might say, this insight would be the only thing a person would need to feel contented and whole and at peace.  

Today someone asked whether the farm was having any difficulties due to the pandemic.  We realized that this pandemic has raised some essential questions about the current consumer culture and economy. It’s created a forum in which to speak about what our essential needs are.  It has made our priorities (at least on the farm) crystal clear. The answers are quite simple.  Nutritious food. Clean air.  Clean water.  Health care.  Exercise. And helpful and kind relationships between people and the way that we live on the planet.  What we do on a farm is deemed essential.  We are as busy as we usually are in the spring as we prepare the land for planting and harvesting and as we work together to help one another in this activity.  If anything, ironically our isolation during this pandemic has made our relationships more important to one another and our connections stronger to the land.  We have had so much gratitude from and to each other and within the collective of farms and food businesses that are working with these Immune Booster shares as well as from our CSA members, who help us keep going financially and psychically with their connection through our CSA.  It is through this grace of support that has made our jobs more meaningful, and we look forward to another abundant season on the farm with increasing levels of gratitude and connection to our local farmers, local food artisans, and local food shed.

It is with thankfulness and anticipation that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Zingerman’s Bakehouse, Kapnick Orchards, and Goetz Family Farm.  Thanks to our hardworking crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Annie, Andy, Geoff, Jbird, Ryan, Zoe, and Chizo,  who continue to help pull these shares together for you!  Hope you enjoy this community effort of health and sustenance!

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now.  From our research, the virus does not last for more than 24 hours on cardboard, but there are so many unknowns about it, that we are thinking it is the best option for now.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for assistance, if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we may delay in entering check payments. We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time in the next few weeks.  If you paid with PayPal or Venmo, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in a labeled Payment Bag.  We have also recently acquired VENMO, so if you have that app, please feel free to send money that way to @Deb-Lentz, with 6748 as the last four numbers of the phone number. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so that we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  Also, if you have time to support or thank the businesses that are helping us provide you with convenient Pick Up Locations, please express your gratitude to ROOSROAST, PURE PASTURES, and AGRICOLE FARM STOP.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy with so many wonderful partners in our community.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for more sunshine!              
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s”  OH GEE KIMCHI   This jar includes (napa cabbage, carrots, apples, dried hot pepper, onion, garlic, fresh ginger root, filtered water, sea salt). This lively ferment is bursting with flavor. A ginger forward zing and pleasant hot pepper warmth, balanced by the savory depth of garlic and onion, and the subtle sweetness of carrot and apple. Eat with everything!  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, such as tacos and other meat dishes, roasted vegetables, sandwiches, and salads.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED and will last up to 3 months or longer.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA OR SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive 1 /4 pound of pea or sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” SALAD MIX: leafy, herbaceous flavors with a mixture of any of the following: red or green mizuna, green wave mustartd. Red giant mustard, kojima tatsoi, Avon spinach, gray sugar, pea shoots, and black sunflower shoots; rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or lightly braised or added to soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” BRIGHT LIGHTS SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor with slight sweetness at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; good source of vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron and calcium.
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.  

“Harvest Kitchen’s” PURE MICHIGAN GRANOLA:  A granola style celebration of the diversity of the Michigan Bounty. Ferris Farms organic rolled oats, organic flax seeds and organic sunflower seeds with Traverse Bay Farms organic dried wild blueberries, and Lesser Farms Honey.  Harvest Kitchen (https://harvest-kitchen.com) produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale  at info@harvest-kitchen.com .
-How to use: mix with yogurt, salad topping, bake in bread or muffins, roll in bananas and freeze, toss it with oatmeal
-How to store:  Store for many days in an airtight container at room temperature.

“Raterman Bread’s“  SESAME SOURDOUGH BREAD: This sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives by fermentation of dough with naturally occurring lactobacilli and yeast making it more nutritious and easier to digest. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.
-How to use: roast it with chicken, good as toast or sandwiches, use as a bread bowl for soup, make homemade croutons or stuffing
-How to store: lasts for 4 to 5 days at room temperature

“Kapnick Orchard’s FUJI APPLES: crisp, pale-ivory to white flesh, crunchy and low in acid, sweet-tart flavor with notes of honey and citrus; originally crossed between a Red Delicious and an old Virginia Rails Genet apple; excellent source of vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system. Kapnick Orchards (http://www.kapnickorchards.com) supply apples and other products year-round at their farm market in Britton, MI.  They can also be found at the Argus Farm Stops and Agricole Farm Stop, the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, the Saline indoor Farmers Market, and 3 winter markets in Canton. For more information email kapnicks@tc3net.com.
-How to use: good for snacking, salads, and also baking
-How to store: can be stored for several months in the refrigerator

“Zingerman’s Creamery” FRESH GOAT CHEESE:  a crisp, clean flavor and a creamy texture from local Alpine, Nubian,and Saanen goats.  Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use:  Adds a great twist to recipes calling for ricotta, cream cheese, or even yogurt. Perfect with fresh fruit or roasted red peppers.
-How to store: refrigerate for up to a week

“Zingerman’s Bakehouse” CREAM OF WHEAT:  You will receive one pound of this fresh, coarsely milled, organic soft white wheat from Ferris Organic Farm in Eaton Rapids, MI. It makes a wheat porridge that’s smooth, nutty, and delicious. Zingerman’s Bakehouse  is an artisanal retail and wholesale bakery and baking school in Ann Arbor, Michigan. You can find out more about them by checking out their website at https://www.zingermansbakehouse.com/about-us/. You can visit them at 3711 Plaza Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108 or call them at 734-761-209.
-How to use:  use just like you would your oatmeal, with dried fruits, maple syrup, honeys, etc.
-How to store: keep in your cupboard until expiration date

“Ginger Deli’s” KOHLRABI SALAD: This salad is 100% vegan and gluten free.  It can also be nut-free, if you choose not to add the crushed peanuts and dried shallot cup.   This salad is featuring Tantre Farm’s shredded kohlrabi, carrot, daikon radish, and a pickled Tantre watermelon-radish rose or carrot, along with shredded green papaya and a dash of cilantro, mint, chives, and mango with a dressing in a separate cup of water, lime, minced garlic, chili flakes, vinegar, and new this week– Northern Michigan maple  syrup.  This salad is created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea.
-How to use: when ready to use, take dressing out of cup and toss with shredded vegetables and top with cup of nuts and shallots
-How to store: keep in refrigerator for 5 days

“Ginger Deli’s” TURMERIC CHICKEN: You will receive a 16 oz container of this slow-cooked turmeric dish made with organic chicken, fresh turmeric roots, organic ginger roots, yellow onion, and Tantre Farm carrots. This thousand year old Vietnamese recipe was used traditionally by mothers with a newborn baby to heal their body due to it’s strong anti-inflammatory effects.  
-How to use:  reheat with bread or rice
-How to store: store in refrigerator for 3 to 4 days

“Tantre Farm’s” CARROTS:  You will receive 2 kinds of carrots in a plastic bag.  Chantenay (orange root that is shorter than some, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Napoli (a specialized orange variety with a sweet taste; 7” roots are cylindrical, smooth, and blunt with edible, green leaves).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

“Tantre Farm’s” POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 4 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container

“Tantre Farm’s” SPINACH: You will receive this crisp, hoop house grown, dark green leaf bunched in a bag; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron and a plethora of other nutrients and antioxidants. The appearance of spinach also marks the official beginning of spring!
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. SUMMER CSA 2020:  If you are interested in our 18-week Summer CSA, please sign up for $630 on our online registration at http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.   The first pick up begins the week of May 24-30.  The last week is Sept. 20-26.  If you need help finding share partners let us know, since we like to sometimes play “matchmaker” if we can.

2. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  Harvest Kitchen wants to reassure their current and future customers that Harvest Kitchen complies with the highest sanitation standards throughout their production process and is a facility that is inspected by both the USDA and MDARD.  Also Harvest Kitchen will be shifting their focus and expanding their menu options during this critical time. They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

3. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, if you are interested in frozen beef, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order.  In general, they will be sold in bulk or by the cut, since we have USDA slaughtered beef.  Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

4. WEEKLY “IMMUNE BOOSTER” MULTIFARM SHARE EACH WEEK: If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please watch for another email every Monday, since we are planning to continue providing you with healthy products with easy pick up as long as we are able.  If you are stocked up for the week or uninterested for now, please look for Tantre Farm and our partners on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, or on the Tantre Farm website.  Tantre Farm produce will continue to be available at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops of AA, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea  year-round, and eventually hopefully at the Chelsea and Ann Arbor Farmers Markets again this summer.

5.  FROG HOLLER ORGANIC FARM SEEDLINGS FOR SALE:  Our good friends at Frog Holler are trying to get the word out that they have organic  plant starts available for online ordering through froghollerorganic.com with pick up or delivery hopefully in the near future, so we are letting you know.  There is some debate about whether vegetable plant starts are deemed essential under these circumstances and uncertainty as to whether they will be allowed at all. If growing a garden is essential to your sense of food security, please consider contacting your state rep and MDARD to encourage them to allow the sale of vegetable plant starts this spring.  Happy gardening!

RECIPES

HONEY ROASTED CARROTS WITH GOAT CHEESE AND THYME (https://reciperunner.com/honey-roasted-carrots-goat-cheese-thyme/) Serves 4.
14 carrots, cut in half lengthwise then into approximately 2 inch long pieces
1 tablespoon olive oil
Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper
1 tablespoon of honey
2 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl toss together the carrots, olive oil, salt and pepper.  Dump the carrots out onto a rimmed baking sheet and spread them into a single layer.  Place the carrots in the oven and roast for 15 minutes.  Remove them from the oven, drizzle with the honey and toss to coat them.  Roast the carrots in the oven for another 10 or until slightly caramelized and softened. Place the roasted carrots on a serving platter and top with the crumbled goat cheese, thyme and another drizzle of honey.
Serve immediately.

SPINACH SQUARES BAKE (from Simply in Season by Mary Beth Lind and Cathleen Hockman-Wert)
3 eggs
1 cup milk
1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1/2 cup flour
1 tsp baking powder
2 to 2 1/2 cups shredded cheese (or goat cheese)
1/2 lb fresh spinach, chopped
Mix together eggs, milk, flour, and baking powder.  Then add cheese and spinach or sorrel and press into greased baking pan.  Bake in preheated oven at 350 degrees until knife comes out clean, 30-35 minutes.

FARRO WITH PEA SHOOTS AND SPRING ONIONS (https://www.washingtonpost.com/recipes/farro-with-pea-shoots-and-spring-onions/12670/)  Serves 10.
Kosher salt
1 pound farro, preferably semi-pearled (maybe might be good on cooked Zingerman’s Cream of Wheat too)
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 bunch spring onions or 2 bunches scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced (white and green parts kept separate), about 1 1/2 cups
1 small carrot, peeled and finely diced (1/2 cup)
8 oz. pea shoots (substitute thin strips of spinach or Swiss Chard)
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup pitted Kalamata olives, coarsely chopped
8 ounces feta cheese or goat cheese, crumbled (about 2 cups)
Freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon (3 to 4 tablespoons)
Fill a large pot with 4 quarts of cold water, stir in 1 tablespoon of salt and bring the water to a boil over high heat. Add the farro. Reduce the heat so that the water is barely bubbling around the edges and cook, stirring occasionally, until the farro is tender, about 25 minutes (the grains will start to split). Drain well in a colander, and transfer to a large rimmed baking sheet to cool to room temperature. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the oil shimmers. Add the white parts of the spring onions or scallions, the carrot and 1/2 teaspoon of salt, and cook, stirring, until the onion softens and browns in places, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, stir in the pea shoots and toss with tongs for a minute or so until they just start to wilt; return the skillet to the heat if they’re slow to wilt. Season with salt and pepper to taste.  Transfer the cooled farro to a serving bowl and toss with the wilted pea shoot mixture, the green parts of the spring onions or scallions, the olives, the feta, the lemon juice and the remaining 1/4 cup of oil. Taste, and adjust the seasonings if needed.

KIMCHI BEEF BURGER   Serves 4. (https://www.cleaneatingmag.com/recipes/kimchi-beef-burgers)  
12 oz lean ground beef
5 tbsp lightly drained finely chopped Kimchi, divided
1 avocado, peeled, pitted and thinly sliced
4 whole-grain buns, toasted (or Raterman Bread)
4 oz Persian cucumber, thinly sliced on the diagonal
3 tbsp olive oil mayonnaise, divided
2 tsp sesame oil, divided
2 tsp reduced-sodium soy sauce, divided
1/8 tsp sea salt, or to taste
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp brown rice vinegar
In a large bowl, combine beef, 3 tbsp kimchi, 1 tbsp mayonnaise and 1 tsp each sesame oil and soy sauce. Shape into 4 ½-inch-thick patties. Season on both sides with salt and pepper. Mist a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray and heat on medium. Add patties and cook, turning once, until beef reads 160?F when tested with a thermometer, 5 to 7 minutes.(Alternatively, if grilling, chill patties at least 30 minutes to firm up; cook on a greased grill for 5 to 7 minutes, turning halfway.)
Meanwhile, in a small bowl, stir together vinegar, remaining 2 tbsp mayonnaise, 2 tbsp kimchi, 1 tsp sesame oil and 1 tsp soy sauce.
Lay avocado slices over cut side of each bun bottom. Top with patty, cucumber slices, sauce and bun top.

SWISS CHARD SOUP (Serves 4)
1 onion, diced
2 stalks celery, diced
2 carrots, dices
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 potatoes, diced
1 (14.5 oz) can diced tomato
1/4 cup red wine
4 cups veggie bouillon
1 (15.5 oz) cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
2 bunches Swiss chard (and/or 1 bag spinach), stemmed & chopped
salt and pepper to taste
Saute onion; add celery, carrots and garlic; cook until soft.  Add all ingredients; cover and bring to a boil; simmer until tender.

CARROT-MUSHROOM LOAF (from Moosewood Cookbook)  Serves 4.
1 cup chopped onion
4 1/2 cups grated carrots
1 lb chopped mushrooms
5 eggs
2 cloves garlic
1 cup fresh whole wheat breadcrumbs (dry out or toast Raterman’s sourdough bread and turn into breadcrumbs)
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
1/4 cup butter
Salt, pepper, basil and thyme, to taste
Crush garlic into melting butter.  Add onions and mushrooms and saute until soft.  Combine all ingredients (saving half the breadcrumbs and cheese for the top).  Season to taste.   Spread into buttered baking pan.  Sprinkle with remaining breadcrumbs and cheese.  Dot with butter.  Bake at 350 for 30 minutes covered, then uncover for an additional 5 minutes.  

CARROT-YOGURT SALAD (from Moosewood Cookbook)
1 lb carrots, coarsely grated
2 medium apples, grated
1 cup firm yogurt
1 Tbsp honey
Pinch of celery seed
Juice from one small lemon
A few dashes each salt and pepper
Optional:
1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1/4 cup toasted sunflower seeds or almonds or cashews
1/2 cup finely minced celery
1/2 cup chopped fresh pineapple
Combine all ingredients, mix well and chill. Optional: Sprinkle with Harvest Kitchen’s Michigan Granola.

CURRIED GREENS AND POTATOES (from Eating Well is the Best Revenge by Marian Burros)  Serves 2
Choose any combination of greens and serve with crusty bread.
1 lb (16 oz) potatoes
1 lb (16 oz) mixed greens (spinach, Swiss chard, salad greens)
1 or more clove(s) of garlic
1 tsp olive oil
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp tumeric
1/4 (or less) tsp hot pepper flakes or cayenne pepper
2 cups canned, crushed, no salt tomatoes
Scrub, but do not peel potatoes.  Boil or steam for 17-20 minutes until tender.  Trim tough stems from greens, wash well, tear or slice into small pieces.  Mince garlic (use a 1/2 teaspoon of salt to help mincing).  Heat oil in pan, add greens and garlic.  When greens begin to soften, add spices and tomatoes, reduce heat and continue to cook.  Drain potatoes and cut into bite size pieces.  Add to the greens and continue to cook over low heat to blend flavors.  Garnish with Garden Works Pea Shoots and add some Brinery’s Kimchi.

Immune Booster Week 3, April 4, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 3) SHARE
April 4, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 3) SHARE!
It’s amazing what a difference two days of sunshine will do for the land and us after a long, cold winter.  There is such a cheerful uplift when looking over the brown hills and barren branches to the greening  of the wheat fields and sprouted garlic.  After three inches of rain, the rhubarb is thrusting it’s bulbous leaves up out of the brown, moist earth, and each branch is swollen on the fruit trees and the raspberries with buds fattening in the afternoon sun.  The sultry, relaxing, gentle warmth is punctuated by the sound of geese and cranes in the sweet air that surrounds us.  It is hard not to feel content in spite of the dire human predicaments we face each day.  This week has been wonderful to share with our farmer friends and workers out on the land.  Sharing the good food and clean air and the abundance of nature.  It’s almost impossible to imagine a greater joy than this in the face of our mutually shared catastrophe.  We are hoping that everyone can enjoy a little space in the sunshine these days.

It is with sunshine and hope for a brighter tomorrow that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Kapnick Orchards, and Goetz Family Farm.  Thanks to our hardworking crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Annie, Andy, and welcome back to Geoff, Jbird, and Chizo,  who helped pull these shares together for you!  Hope you enjoy this community effort of health and sustenance!

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now.  From our research, the virus does not last for more than 3 days, but there are so many unknowns about it, that we are thinking it is the best option for now.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for assistance, if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we may delay in entering check payments. We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time in the next few weeks.  If you paid with PayPal or Venmo, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in a labeled Payment Bag.  We have also recently acquired VENMO, so if you have that app, please feel free to send money that way to @Deb-Lentz, with 6748 as the last four numbers of the phone number. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so that we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  Also, if you have time to support or thank the businesses that are helping us provide you with convenient Pick Up Locations, please express your gratitude to ROOSROAST, PURE PASTURES, and AGRICOLE FARM STOP.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy with so many wonderful partners in our community.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for more sunshine!              
–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s” GALAXY ROSE SAUERKRAUT:  This jar has green cabbage,
Tantre red heart radish, filtered water, and sea salt.  A gorgeous and deeply pink sauerkraut with a whimsical sweetness and pleasing texture. Red Heart Radish (commonly know as “watermelon radish”) is an heirloom variety, prized by our ancestors and modern chefs alike for its flavor and its beauty. The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially a perfect topping for tacos and other meat dishes, roasted vegetables, sandwiches, and salads.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED and will last up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor.

“The Brinery’s” TEMPEH:  a traditional Indonesian soy product, that is made from fermented soybeans. The Brinery’s tempeh is made with non gmo organic soybeans, and is an excellent source of protein and fiber; contains some B vitamins which we need to help us break down and get energy from our food, as well as support our nervous system, and a good selection of minerals including calcium, magnesium and phosphorus and zinc. “THE BLACK SPOTTING IS NORMAL, SAFE, AND DELICIOUS!  It’s also a HARMLESS sign of a fully ripened tempeh”.  Please go to https://keepitvegan.com/vegan-quick-tips/how-to-tell-if-tempeh-has-gone-bad/ for a really helpful link to give you further information about tempeh with pictures, descriptions, and recipes.
-How to use:  good sauteed, fried, crumbled as a taco filling and on salads, great on sandwiches such as a tempeh reuben, and as your center of the plate protein main course for any meal!
-How to store: Thawed tempeh should be used within 5 days in your refrigerator.

“Garden Works Farm’s” SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive 1/4 pound of sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” RANCHERO ONIONS:  You will receive 2 bulbs; large Spanish type yellow onion, delicately textured flesh.  Goetz Farm is a 3-generation family farm in Riga, MI.  You can find their produce at both Argus Farm Stops, Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market, Downtown Farmington Farmer’s Market and Chelsea Farmer’s Market.  See https://www.localharvest.org/goetz-family-farm-M56215 for more information.
-How to use: good in French onion soup, great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, grilled, roasted, stir-fried, etc.
-How to store:  can last for 3 to 6 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.  Just cut out the bad part, chop up the rest of the onion and freeze in bag.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” SALAD MIX: leafy, herbaceous flavors with a mixture of any of the following: red or green mizuna, green wave mustartd. Red giant mustard, kojima tatsoi, Avon spinach, gray sugar, pea shoots, and black sunflower shoots; rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or lightly braised or added to soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” BRIGHT LIGHTS SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor with slight sweetness at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; good source of vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron and calcium.
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.  

“Goetz Family Farm’s” RIVER RADISHES (or Tantre Watermelon/Daikon Radishes):  Some of you will receive River Radish (hoop house grown, smooth, bright red roots with short green, edible tops and a sweet/hot taste) or Tantre Daikon Radish (looks like an overgrown white carrot, but with a slightly mild radish taste; crunchy and sweet texture; good macrobiotic root that is good for the gut) or Tantre Watermelon Radish (an heirloom Chinese variety; large, 2- to 4-inch, round radishes with unique dark magenta flesh and light green/white skin along with a remarkably sweet, delicious taste).
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; radish greens. (excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s) delicious in soups or stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

“Harvest Kitchen’s”  OLD SCHOOL FLOWER CHILD GRANOLA:
Their Flower Child combination is made with Ferris Farm’s organic oats, cashews, coconut, cinnamon, and sweetened with Lesser Farm’s Honey.  Harvest Kitchen (https://harvest-kitchen.com) produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale  at info@harvest-kitchen.com .
-How to use: mix with yogurt, salad topping, bake in bread or muffins, roll in bananas and freeze, toss it with oatmeal
-How to store:  Store for many days in an airtight container at room temperature.

“Raterman Bread’s “ MULTIGRAIN SOURDOUGH BREAD: This sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives by fermentation of dough with naturally occurring lactobacilli and yeast making it more nutritious and easier to digest. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.
-How to use: roast it with chicken, good as toast or sandwiches, use as a bread bowl for soup, make homemade croutons or stuffing
-How to store: lasts for 4 to 5 days at room temperature

“Kapnick Orchard’s” RED DELICIOUS APPLES: one of the most well known commercially grown apples in the United States;  medium-sized and broadly round at the top and tapered at the base with  fine-grained, creamy white flesh; crisp and juicy with a mildly sweet taste and hints of melon.  Excellent source of vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system and higher in antioxidants than many other apple varieties. Kapnick Orchards (http://www.kapnickorchards.com) supply apples and other products year-round at their farm market in Britton, MI.  They can also be found at the Argus Farm Stops and Agricole Farm Stop, the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, the Saline indoor Farmers Market, and 3 winter markets in Canton. For more information email kapnicks@tc3net.com.
-How to use: used mostly in fresh preparations, so good in chopped salads and on sandwiches, quesadillas and burgers, but can be slow cooked and pureed to make sauces and for soups  
-How to store: can be stored for a month in the refrigerator

“Zingerman’s Creamery” MOZZARELLA CHEESE:  Their fresh mozzarella is crafted from a cow’s milk curd.  They hand stretch the curds into balls of beautiful mozzarella every day for a truly fresh and delicious experience.  Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use:  Perfect with a ripe, juicy tomato and great on sandwiches, pizza, and manicotti.
-How to store: refrigerate for up to a week

“Ginger Deli’s” KOHLRABI SALAD: This salad is 100% vegan and gluten free.  It can also be nut-free, if you choose not to add the crushed peanuts and dried shallot cup.   This salad is featuring Tantre Farm’s shredded kohlrabi, carrot, daikon radish, and a pickled Tantre watermelon-radish rose or carrot, along with shredded green papaya and a dash of cilantro, mint, chives, and mango with a dressing in a separate cup of water, lime, minced garlic, chili flakes, vinegar, and new this week– Northern Michigan maple  syrup.  This salad is created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea.
-How to use: when ready to use, take dressing out of cup and toss with shredded vegetables and top with cup of nuts and shallots
-How to store: in refrigerator for 5 days

“Tantre Farm’s” CARROTS:  You will receive 2 kinds of carrots in a plastic bag.  Chantenay (orange root that is shorter than some, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Napoli (a specialized orange variety with a sweet taste; 7” roots are cylindrical, smooth, and blunt with edible, green leaves).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

“Tantre Farm’s” POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 4 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container

“Tantre Farm’s” SPINACH: You will receive this crisp, hoop house grown, dark green leaf bunched in a bag; best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll,  rich in of vitamin K, vitamin A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron and a plethora of other nutrients and antioxidants. The appearance of spinach also marks the official beginning of spring!
-How to use: delicious flavor when juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. SUMMER CSA 2020:  If you are interested in our 18-week Summer CSA, please sign up for $630 on our online registration at http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.   The first pick up begins the week of May 24-30.  The last week is Sept. 20-26.

2. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  Harvest Kitchen wants to reassure their current and future customers that Harvest Kitchen complies with the highest sanitation standards throughout their production process and is a facility that is inspected by both the USDA and MDARD.  Also Harvest Kitchen will be shifting their focus and expanding their menu options during this critical time. They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

3. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, if you are interested in frozen beef, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order.  In general, they will be sold in bulk or by the cut, since we have USDA slaughtered beef.  Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

4. “IMMUNE BOOSTER” MULTIFARM SHARE NEXT WEEK:  If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please watch for another email in the next few days, since we are planning to continue providing you with healthy products with easy pick up.  If you are stocked up for the week or uninterested for now, please look for Tantre Farm and our partners on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.  Tantre produce will continue to be available at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops of AA, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea  year-round, and eventually hopefully at the Chelsea and Ann Arbor Farmers Markets again this summer.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!

WINTER GREENS SOUP (from Fields of Greens)
A hearty, nourishing winter soup with full flavors and a smooth texture.  The kale will take longer to cook than the spinach or chard, so be sure it’s tender before you puree the soup.
4 cups vegetable stock
1 Tbsp light olive oil
1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced, about 3 cups
Salt and pepper, to taste
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 cup Swiss chard stems, thinly sliced
1 medium sized potato, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
1 large carrot, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
1/4 cup dry white wine (not cooking wine)
1 bunch kale (stems removed) or 1 bag Goetz’s Salad Mix
1 bunch of Swiss chard (stems removed and leaves washed)
1 bunch of spinach (stems removed and leaves washed)
1/2 teaspoon salt
several pinches black pepper
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
Garlic croutons
Grated Parmesan cheese or Zingerman’s Mozzarella cheese
Make the stock and keep it warm over low heat.  Heat the olive oil in a soup pot and add the onions, salt, and several pinches of pepper.  Saute over medium heat until the onion is soft, 5-7 minutes.  Then add the garlic, chard stems, potatoes and carrot.  Saute until the vegetables are heated through, about 5 minutes.  Add 1/2 cup stock, cover the pot and cook for about 10 minutes.  When the vegetables are tender, add the white wine and simmer for 1-2 minutes, until the pan is nearly dry.  Stir in the kale, chard, 1 teaspoon salt, a few pinches of pepper and 3 cups stock.  Cover the pot and cook for 10-15 minutes until the chard and kale are tender.  Add the spinach and cook for 3-5 minutes, until just wilted.  Puree the soup in a blender or food processor until it is smooth.  Thin with a little more stock if it seems too thick.  Season with lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste.  Garnish each serving with homemade garlic croutons (can be homemade with Raterman Bread) and a sprinkle of grated Parmesan or Zingerman’s Mozzarella cheese.  Serve with Raterman’s Bread and Ginger Deli’s Kohlrabi Salad.
Note: A small handful of French sorrel leaves may be added for their lemony flavor or garnish with Garden Work’s Sunflower Shoots.

KOREAN POTATO SALAD WITH APPLES (https://www.thespruceeats.com/korean-potato-salad-2118849)  Serves 6.
4 small to medium potatoes (peeled and cubed)
1 small carrot (cut into small chunks)
2 eggs, hard-boiled (yolks removed and cut into small chunks)
1/2 small cucumber (thinly sliced)
1/2 small yellow or sweet onion (thinly sliced and diced)
1 Kapnick’s apple (cut into small chunks)
3/4 cup mayonnaise
Optional: 1/4 cup ham or Canadian bacon (diced)
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste
Boil potatoes until tender, about 10 minutes. Add carrot (and eggs if not yet hard-boiled) for the last 8 minutes. While cooking, sprinkle salt on the cucumber and onion and let them sweat for about 10 minutes.  Remove potatoes and carrot (and eggs) and let cool. If necessary, cut egg whites into small chunks. Rinse cucumber and onion lightly and squeeze out excess water with paper towels. In a large bowl, add mayonnaise and all of the other ingredients and mix gently. Taste and add salt and pepper as   desired. Add slices or grated fresh Zingerman’s Mozzarella Cheese. Serve as a side dish or as a sandwich filling with Raterman Bread.

GRILLED BUFFALO TEMPEH & MOZZARELLA SANDWICH (https://veganyackattack.com/2013/04/18/grilled-buffalo-tempeh-mozzarella-sandwich/)
2-3 oz . Brinery’sTempeh, cubed
3 Tbsp . Water
1 C . Kale (or Spinach, Salad Mix, Swiss Chard), Chopped
1 1/2 Tbsp . Buffalo Sauce Adjust to your preference (I use Frank’s Red Hot Buffalo Sauce)
1/3 C . shredded Mozzarella Cheese (or Vegan Cheese)
1 Tbsp . Vegenaise or Mayonnaise
2 Slices of Raterman’s Sourdough Bread 
Warm a small pan over medium heat on a stove. Place the tempeh cubes and water into the pan, cook covered for 5 minutes; then start breaking up the tempeh with a spoon. Cook uncovered until the water is mostly evaporated and add the kale to the pan, along with the buffalo sauce. Saute the mixture until the kale wilts, and in the meantime take the two slices of bread and spread a thin layer of vegenaise onto both sides of each slice. Carefully place the buffalo tempeh onto the bread and top with the vegan mozzarella. Top the sandwich with the other slice of bread and put it into a panini press, George Foreman grill or onto a skillet. Cook until the cheese shreds have melted and the bread is golden brown. Serve warm!  Add some dollops of Brinery’s Sauerkraut to this sandwich.

TEMPEH AND RADISH STIR FRY (https://sereneearthrecipes.com/rawmarkable-vegan-snacks/vegan-eats/tempeh-and-radish-stir-fry/)
8 oz. organic Brinery’s tempeh, cubed into 1/2 inch pieces
1 cup sliced radishes
1/4 cup sliced onion
2 large garlic cloves
about 3 tbsp organic coconut oil
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp sesame seeds
2 tbsp soy or tamari sauce
1/4 tsp turmeric
1/4 tsp onion powder
pinch of black pepper
1 bag of any salad greens (Goetz’s salad mix, Tantre spinach, kale, baby greens, etc)
Saute the garlic, radish and onions first with 2 tbsp of coconut oil until golden, then add the tempeh, Worcestershire sauce, tamari, turmeric, onion powder and pepper. Cook with the last tbsp of coconut oil until tempeh is brown on all sides, about 2 minutes.  Once the tempeh, radish and onions are fully browned, remove from heat and let cool a bit. Take your salad greens, put in a bowl, and add the tempeh stir fry. Top with sesame seeds and  Garden Work’s Sunflower Shoots!

TEMPEH, CABBAGE, CARROTS AND SAUERKRAUT (https://www.thesuppersprograms.org/content/tempeh-cabbage-carrots-and-sauerkraut)
1/2 tempeh (cut in 1″ cubes)
2 tablespoons safflower oil
sea salt (optional, add to taste)
filtered water
1 onion (medium-sized)
2 carrots (julienned)
1/2 head of cabbage (or Salad Mix, Swiss Chard, Spinach ), finely sliced
1/2 cup Brinery’s sauerkraut (plus juice)
mirin (optional splash)
shoyu (optional splash)
Boil tempeh in water for 5 minutes, then drain. Saute pre-boiled tempeh in safflower oil until lightly browned.  Set aside.  Saute onion in safflower oil for several minutes, adding water as needed to generate a light, steaming effect. Add carrots and sautee for several minutes.  Add water as needed to generate light steaming effect.  Add cabbage to onion and saute several minutes more.  Season with salt as necessary.  Add tempeh, then add water to almost cover the vegetables  Cover and cook at low for 15 minutes.  At the end of the cooking process, add sauerkraut and its juice, and cook for 2 minutes at low so as not to damage the beneficial probiotics of the kraut.  OPTIONAL: Finish with a splash of mirin and shoyu and serve with Ginger Deli’s Kohlrabi Salad. 

APPLE SPINACH SALAD (https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/my-favorite-apple-spinach-salad/)
10 ounces spinach, chopped
2 large apples, cored and thinly-sliced
half a small red onion, peeled and thinly-sliced
1 cup walnut halves, toasted (or pecans)
2/3 cup dried cranberries
5 ounces goat cheese, crumbled (or feta cheese, or blue cheese, or Zingerman’s Mozarella)
1 batch apple cider vinaigrette (see below)
CHAMPAGNE VINAIGRETTE INGREDIENTS:
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup champagne vinegar (or apple cider vinegar)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
a generous pinch of salt and black pepper
(optional) 1 tablespoon honey or maple syrup, to sweeten
Add spinach, apples, red onion, walnuts, dried cranberries, and half of the goat cheese to a large bowl.  Drizzle with the vinaigrette, and toss to combine.  Serve immediately, garnished with the remaining cheese and add a crunchy topping of Harvest Kitchen’s granola.
TO MAKE THE CHAMPAGNE VINAIGRETTE:
Add all ingredients together in a bowl and whisk to combine.  Or, add all ingredients to a mason jar, cover, and shake to combine.

Immune Booster Week 2, March 28, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER (Week 2) SHARE
March 28, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” (Week 2) SHARE!
The last couple of days with the rain and the warmth has brought the singing peepers out of their frozen bed of mud to sing all night.  Such a comforting chorus.  Thousands of voices together surging through the darkness as the rain drips and drops.  The soil is now moist and soft and full of young, bright, baby worms. The buds of the red maple are swollen and ready to open with the sap now full up into the wee branches.  It is good to see life coming back in its own way dependent on it’s own inner vitality.  What is it that allows the frogs, the baby peepers, to sing all night?  It doesn’t seem like there’s much food around right now.  How is it that the worms are so shiny and red?  Have they been eating something inside the soil that is giving them special energy?  What is it that allows the maple buds to swell and surge with such exponential growth?  Perhaps something about the sun? Something in the soil and roots?  And where is it that we find our renewal for this coming season?  From where and from what do we find our interdependence?  Does it come from some mysterious place deep within our hearts and minds?  Does it come from our relationship with one another? Does it come from the land and the soil and the stars and the sky? Does it come from a simple black bean boiled in its own juices with garlic and herbs?  Does it come from the sweet, creamy milk of a cow made into cheese?  Does it come from the yeasty wildness and the wild fermentation of a soft wheat dough?  Does it come from the sprouted infancy of peas and sunflowers?  Does it come from the raging hews of the succulent chard leaves?   Does it come from the apples, so sweet, stored carefully for many months?  Does it come from the orange carrots, the white radish, the starchy potatoes, or the salty rind of the cabbage, or the shredded flesh of the kohlrabi?  What is it that carries us through our day and will renew us for this season and more seasons to come?  Is it our nation? Our community? Our friends? Our family? Our connection to all life on earth?  What is it?
It is from this wondering of renewal that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, Ginger Deli, Zingerman’s Creamery, Kapnick Orchards, and Goetz Family Farm.  Thanks to our very small, hardworking crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Andy, and Christine, who helped pull these shares together for you!  Hope you enjoy this community effort of health and sustenance!

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 1 box that is 1-1/9 bushel.  Due to concern about contamination from the coronavirus, we are asking for you to take and keep the box at home for now.  From our research, the virus does not last for more than 3 days, but there are so many unknowns about it, that we are thinking it is the best option for now.  We definitely are hoping that you can return them to us sooner or later.  Please ask for help if you need any help in loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we may delay in entering check payments. We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time in the next week or so.  If you paid with PayPal, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash (only in a labeled envelope) at the Food Hub and the Farm and place in a labeled Payment Bag.  We have also recently acquired VENMO, so if you have that app, please feel free to send money that way to @Deb-Lentz, with 6748 as the last four numbers of the phone number. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we continue to face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy.  We wish you safe passage as we strengthen our immune systems with good local food and hopes for renewal!              
–Deb and Richard

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1.  INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE:  Tantre Farm is looking for self-motivated interns/apprentices with a positive attitude and good work ethic, who would like to work on a bio-intensive, small-scale, organic farm.  They need to be willing to work 8-10 hours/day and be willing to live semi-communally with some cooking and cleaning responsibilities since this is a work-learning experience.  Please spread the word and have those interested review our description on our website and fill out an application:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/internships.  Please have them text Deb at 734-385-6748 or email us at info@tantrefarm.com.  Thanks for your help in spreading the word.  

2. SUMMER CSA 2020:  If you are interested in our 18-week Summer CSA, please sign up for $630 on our online registration at http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.   The first pick up begins the week of May 24-30.  The last week is Sept. 20-26.

3. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  Harvest Kitchen wants to reassure their current and future customers that Harvest Kitchen complies with the highest sanitation standards throughout their production process and is a facility that is inspected by both the USDA and MDARD.  Also Harvest Kitchen will be shifting their focus and expanding their menu options during this critical time. They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

4. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, if you are interested in frozen beef, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order.  In general, they will be sold in bulk or by the cut, since we have USDA slaughtered beef.  Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

5.  “IMMUNE BOOSTER” MULTIFARM SHARE NEXT WEEK:  If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please watch for another email in the next few days, since we are planning to continue providing you with healthy products with easy pick up.  If you are stocked up for the week or uninterested for now, please look for Tantre Farm and our partners on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.  Tantre produce will continue to be available at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops of AA, and Agricole Farm Stop in Chelsea  year-round, and eventually hopefully at the Chelsea and Ann Arbor Farmers Markets again this summer.  

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“The Brinery’s” FENNEL LOVE SAUERKRAUT:    This dreamy romance between fronds and fruits has a perfectly balanced fennel bite.  This jar includes green cabbage, apples, carrots, golden beets, fennel, and sea salt.  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, the Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially a perfect topping for tacos and other meat dishes, roasted vegetables, sandwiches, and salads.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED and will last up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA or SUNFLOWER SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive ¼ pound of pea shoots or sunflower shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at both Argus Farm Stops, Peoples Food Coop, and the Ann Arbor Farmers Market or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s RED RUSSIAN KALE:  these have a sweet, mild, cabbage flavor, but the stems are purple, and leaves are deep gray-green, purple-veined, flat, non-curled, and tooth-edged; highest protein content of all the cultivated vegetables; very high in calcium, iron, vitamins A and C, and good source of fiber and folic acid.  Goetz Farm is a 3-generation family farm in Riga, MI.  You can find their produce at both Argus Farm Stops, Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market, Downtown Farmington Farmer’s Market and Chelsea Farmer’s Market.  See https://www.localharvest.org/goetz-family-farm-M56215 for more information.
-How to use: for tender leaves perfect for salads, soups, light cooking.
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s LETTUCE: a leafy, herbaceous annual grown mostly for salad greens, but especially delicious at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C
How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups.
How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Goetz Family Farm’s SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor with slight sweetness at this time of year, since it is hoop house grown; good source of vitamins A, E, and C, as well as iron and calcium.
How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.  

“Harvest Kitchen’s” BLACK BEAN STARTER BROTH: This Michigan black bean infused Vegetable Stock Starter Broth is perfect for simmering with Tantre Farm veggies for making a quick soup or light stew.  Rich in protein and lightly seasoned with fresh parsley, garlic, and a dash of cayenne pepper.  Harvest Kitchen (https://harvest-kitchen.com) produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale at info@harvest-kitchen.com.
-How to use: good foundation for a light soup or stew
-How to store:  It will keep for 3-5 days in the fridge.

“Raterman Bread’s “ SOURDOUGH BREAD: This Original Sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives by fermentation of dough with naturally occurring lactobacilli and yeast making it more nutritious and easier to digest. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.
-How to use: roast it with chicken, good as toast or sandwiches, use as a bread bowl for soup, make homemade croutons or stuffing
-How to store: lasts for 4 to 5 days at room temperature

“Kapnick Orchard’s FUJI APPLES: crisp, pale-ivory to white flesh, crunchy and low in acid, sweet-tart flavor with notes of honey and citrus; originally crossed between a Red Delicious and an old Virginia Rails Genet apple; excellent source of vitamin C, which helps boost the immune system. Kapnick Orchards (http://www.kapnickorchards.com) supply apples and other products year-round at their farm market in Britton, MI.  They can also be found at the Argus Farm Stops and Agricole Farm Stop, the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, the Saline indoor Farmers Market, and 3 winter markets in Canton. For more information email kapnicks@tc3net.com.
-How to use: good for snacking, salads, and also baking
-How to store: can be stored for several months in the refrigerator

“Zingerman’s Creamery” CREAM CHEESE:  a fresh, soft mild-tasting cheese with a slightly grassy tartness and smooth, soft texture made using old-world techniques with local milk.  Zingerman’s Creamery specializes in making cow’s and goat’s milk cheeses, gelato, and sorbets, and are located at the Cheese Shop on the South Side of Ann Arbor.  For more information you can go to their website at https://www.zingermanscreamery.com/about-us or call them at 734-929-0500.
-How to use: good on bagels, crepe fillings, dips, frostings, soups, etc
-How to store: refrigerate for up to 1 or 2 weeks

“Ginger Deli’s” SWEET/SOUR KOHLRABI SALAD: This salad is 100% vegan and gluten free.  It can also be nut-free, if you choose not to add the crushed peanuts and dried shallot cup.   This salad is featuring Tantre Farm’s shredded kohlrabi, carrot, daikon radish, and a pickled Tantre watermelon-radish rose, along with a green papaya and a dash of cilantro, mint, and mango with a dressing in a separate cup of water, lime, honey, garlic, chili flakes, rock sugar, and vinegar.  This salad is created by Ginger Deli (www.gingerdeli.com), a tenant at the Washtenaw Food Hub producing Vietnamese cuisine that packs colorful flavors with a dash of style. Usually found with prepared sandwiches, pho soup, etc. at University of Michigan hospital and Argus Farm Stops in Ann Arbor, and Agricole in Chelsea.
-How to use: when ready to use, take dressing out of cup and toss with shredded vegetables and top with cup of nuts and shallots
-How to store: in refrigerator for 3 days

CARROTS:  You will receive 2 kinds of carrots in a plastic bag.  Chantenay (orange root that is shorter than some, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Napoli (a specialized orange variety with a sweet taste; 7” roots are cylindrical, smooth, and blunt with edible, green leaves).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; stores best in near freezing conditions around 32 degrees and 95% humidity.

POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 4 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container; ideal temperature is 38-48 degrees with high humidity (80-90%).  A basement or very cool closet will work.  If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout.

DAIKON RADISH (White Korean): This daikon will be in a mixed net bag with Watermelon Radish.  It looks like an overgrown white carrot, similar to a Daikon Radish, but blunt-tipped on end, with a lightly mild radish taste.
-How to use: chop or slice into small pieces and saute with olive, salt, and a sprinkle of turmeric; can be eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled; greens are also edible and can be used like any tender green.
-How to store:  not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to a week.This looks like an overgrown purple carrot with internal color ranging from pale purple to white with purple streaks; good, sweet, eating quality, and will be bagged with the beets.

WATERMELON RADISH:  This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag with Daikon Radish; this heirloom Chinese variety is a large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta/pink flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste.
-How to use:  soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with your favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!

TANTRÉ FARM SLAW (A simple, easy salad!) Serves 4.
2 medium beets, grated
1 small kohlrabi
3 orange carrots, grated
1 daikon radish, grated
1 watermelon radish, grated
sesame or sunflower seeds, toasted
olive oil or toasted sesame oil
lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Grate vegetables into a bowl.  Toast sesame or sunflower seeds.  Add when cooled.  Add olive oil and lemon juice as a salad dressing to suit your taste.  Be careful of too much liquid.  The tartness of the lemon should be prominent.  Any combination of root vegetables can be used.  Serve immediately or add some Brinery sauerkraut for an added zing along with some fresh pea or sunflower shoots!

BUTTER-FRIED BABY CARROTS (http://www.happystove.com/recipe/282/Butter+Fried+Baby+Carrots)
1 lb. Baby Carrots
1 /2 stick unsalted butter
Salt to taste
In a non-stick large skillet, on low to medium heat, melt enough butter to generously cover the whole surface of the pan.  When the butter is melted, add immediately the carrots in the pan and let cook, uncovered, stirring frequently until the carrots are soft and slightly brown.  Adjust with some salt and pepper and serve hot as appetizer or as side dish for white and light meat or fish.  Add a zing with a little Brinery’s sauerkraut.

FRESH CARROT JUICE (from Simple Food for the Good Life by Helen Nearing)
1 lb Carrots
1/2 lb Apples
2 beets, sliced and peeled
Core the apples, but do not peel.  Cut them in quarters.  Put carrots, apples and beets through juicer or blender.  Chill and serve.

CREAM CHEESE APPLE DIP (https://amindfullmom.com/caramel-apple-dip-tip-to-keep-apples-from-browning)  Serves 12.
1 package of Cream Cheese at room temperature
1 cup Greek yogurt plain
1/3 cup maple syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
chopped dark chocolate and chopped nuts optional
Apples to dip
Combine the cream cheese, yogurt, maple syrup, and vanilla until well combined. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes to let flavors combine together. 
Before serving, top chocolate and nuts if desired. Serve with apples, crackers, pretzels, and assorted fruit. 

APPLE AND CARROT “SUPPER HERO” MUFFINS (https://cookieandkate.com/apple-carrot-muffins-recipe) Makes 12 muffins.
2 cups packed almond meal or almond flour (10 ounces)
1 1/2 cups old-fashioned oats (certified gluten free if necessary)
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
Optional mix-ins: 1/2 cup chopped walnuts (I used pecans), or raisins or chocolate chips
1/2 cup honey or maple syrup
3 eggs
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1 cup grated Apple (about 1 1/2 apples)
1 cup peeled and grated Carrots (about 3 carrots)
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a 12-cup standard muffin tin with paper muffin cups (I didn’t because I have full faith in my muffin pan, but use them if you’re uncertain).  In a large bowl, combine the almond meal, oats, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and optional mix-ins, if using.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the honey, eggs and butter. Whisk in the grated apple and carrots. Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined.  Spoon the batter into the muffin cups, filling each to the brim. Bake until the muffins are nicely browned on top and a knife inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean, 25 to 30 minutes. Allow muffins to cool completely before storing.  Store leftover muffins in an airtight container in the fridge or freezer. Add a dollop of Cream Cheese on top for a little extra protein.

VEGETARIAN BEAN, SWISS CHARD AND LEMON SOUP  (from Polwig.com food blog)  Serves 6
2 cans of Cannellini Beans
4 cups vegetable stock (or 1 quart Harvest Kitchen Bean Stock)
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 Carrots
2 celery stalks
1 onion
1 lb Potatoes
1 red pepper
1 lemon
Handful Fresh thyme
1 bunch Swiss Chard and/or a bag of Red Russian Kale
1 Tbsp cumin
Dice the onion and celery (you can also add the leafy ends).  Clean the carrots, or scrape them and then cube.  On medium heat saute onions, celery and carrots with 1 tablespoon olive oil.  When they are cooking, dice the peppers add to the pot and cook while you roughly chop the chard and cut potatoes into edible slices or cubes.  When onions have become translucent and peppers a little softer add chard and potatoes.  Top with drained cannellini beans, 1 squeezed lemon (squeeze juice, and then quarter the lemon and cook with the soup) and a bunch of thyme. Add vegetable stock and cumin.   Bring to boil and simmer until the potatoes are soft.  Discard the lemons and serve warm.
Notes:  This soup also freezes really well so if you make a bigger batch you can have it as a pick me up for up to 3 months.  Delicious with Raterman’s bread or the Brinery’s sauerkraut!

GREENS AND VEGGIES POTAJE (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
1 cup parboiled Carrots
1 small onion, chopped
1 1/2 cups cubed, par-boiled Potatoes
1 cup chopped tomato
1/4 tsp cumin
1 bunch Swiss chard and/or a bag of Red Russian Kale, chopped
1 cup cooked Black Bean  
Salt and pepper to taste  
In a medium saucepan, combine carrots, potatoes and approximately 1 cup water.  Simmer on low heat for 30 min, or until a fork pierces easily.  Add onion, tomato and cumin, and simmer for an additional 10 minutes.  Add beans, collard leaves, salt and pepper and simmer for 5 minutes.  Serve over rice and with Kohlrabi Salad.

APPLE AND WATERMELON-RADISH SALAD WITH FETA AND WALNUTS (https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/apple-and-watermelon-radish-salad-with-feta-and-walnuts)  Serves 4.
1/3 cup walnuts
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon walnut oil
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
5 cups Pea Shoots (3 1/2 ounces), cut crosswise into thirds
2 medium Watermelon Radishes (6 ounces), peeled and thinly sliced on a mandoline
1/2 Fuji apple—cored and thinly sliced on a mandoline
2 1/2 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (1/2 cup)
2 Tbsp. snipped chives
Preheat the oven to 350°. Spread the walnuts in a pie plate and toast for 8 minutes, until lightly golden and fragrant. Let cool, then coarsely chop.  Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk the cider vinegar with the mayonnaise, walnut oil and olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Add the pea shoots, radishes, apple, walnuts, feta cheese and chives and toss to coat. Serve right away.

SWISS CHARD, RADISH, AND EGG BREAKFAST BOWL (https://www.beautifuleatsandthings.com/2018/01/05/swiss-chard-radish-and-egg-breakfast-bowl) Serves 2.
1 bunch Swiss Chard, stems removed and coarsely chopped
½ lb Daikon and/or Watermelon Radishes, sliced
1 small onion sliced
2 cloves garlic minced
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 large eggs
Salt and pepper to taste
On medium heat, add oil, garlic, onion, and radishes to skillet. Cook until veggies are tender. Add Swiss chard to skillet, and toss to make sure that all ingredients are mixed. Cook until Swiss chard is tender and add salt/pepper to taste. Distribute evenly into small, serving bowls. In the same skillet, on medium heat, crack eggs (making sure not to disturb the yolk). Fry until the egg white is firm and the yolk is slightly set. Place each egg on top of each bowl and Enjoy! Add pea or sunflower shoots as garnish

Immune Booster Week 1, March 21, 2020

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
IMMUNE BOOSTER SHARE
March 21, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE “IMMUNE BOOSTER” SHARE!
As the winter freeze has gradually abated, and our seedling house fills up with young seedling sprouts, we look forward to inclining temperatures and the refreshing spring rains that add to the already swollen creeks, ponds, and wetlands surrounding our little farm.  The raucous geese chatter to each other staking out territory for this year’s homecoming after flying so many thousands of miles from the south to the north.  We also may find our place in the soil as the cool rains bring the brown earth back to its greenery.  We consider our place in this land and our original purpose in connection to the earth and the biome looking to the end of the winter storage crops and to the beginning of the spring crops working with friends and neighbors to share the harvest.  

This is a time when the essence of life presents itself in the form of a seed that will sprout and grow for many weeks and months.  It is a time when we can also feed our body with the simplest of foods to nurture our inner biome and embrace the greater macrobiome of this place.  Spring is a good time to eat simple foods, plant-based foods that have minerals, vitamins, and lots of roughage with different shapes and textures.  This diversity of fiber is a celebration of a good spring cleaning.  And so it is to live in season, to embrace what is truly our true nature, to embrace and celebrate a delicious spring cleaning.

It is from this genesis that we bring to you this week’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works Organic Farm, the Brinery, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, and Goetz Family Farm.  Thanks to our very small, hardworking, spring crew of Donn, John, Mark, Peter, Zoe, and Harold for helping pull these shares together for you!  Hope you enjoy this community effort of health and sustenance!

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 2 containers: 1/2-bushel plastic crate and our usual half-bushel, summer share box.  While it breaks our hearts to have to pack so many things in plastic, it was our best defense on hand to keep a barrier between the food and lots of hand touching.  We are hoping that we can still go back to some bulk choices some day.  Due to concern about the contamination with the coronvirus, we are also asking for you to take the containers home for now.  From our research, the virus does not last for more than 3 days, but there are so many unknowns about it, that we are thinking it is the best option for now.  Hopefully sooner or later you can return them to us.  

Please ask for help if you need any help loading your share, and it is especially helpful if you are patient and kind with our volunteers as you wait your turn to be checked off for curbside pick up of the boxes. This is a time, like no other, to slow down and be as understanding as possible.  Also, if you have sent a check in the mail, please be patient, since we have had no extra time to enter check payments into our system as of this time.  We will let you know if we are missing your payment some time next week.  If you paid with PayPal, you are all set.  You may drop off checks and cash at the Food Hub and the Farm in a labeled container.  Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for supporting your local farmers and local food artisans as we travel together on this journey of health and mindfulness as we face a myriad of unknowns in the coming days.  We are happy that we may continue to feed you and keep you healthy.  Stay well and strong!              
–Deb and Richard

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1.  INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE:  Tantre Farm is looking for self-motivated interns/apprentices with a positive attitude and good work ethic, who would like to work on a bio-intensive, small-scale, organic farm.  They need to be willing to work 8-10 hours/day and be willing to live semi-communally with some cooking and cleaning responsibilities since this is a work-learning experience.  We offer room, board, and a negotiable stipend dependent on experience and performance.  We do have some part-time jobs available as well, but it is a bit more seasonal and it is without room and board.   Please spread the word and have those interested review our description on our website and fill out an application:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/internships.  Please have them text Deb at 734-385-6748 or email us at info@tantrefarm.com.  Thanks for your help in spreading the word.  

2. SUMMER CSA 2020:  If you are interested in our 18-week Summer CSA, please sign up for $630 on our online registration at http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.  The first pick up begins during the week of May 24-30.  The last week is between Sept. 20-26.

3. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
Harvest Kitchen is a food service that produces delicious, farm-to-table meals delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location with various meal plan options available.  Harvest Kitchen and its staff would like to express their sincerest hopes that our community remains healthy and resilient in the face of this extreme challenge currently facing all of us. They want to reassure their current and future customers that Harvest Kitchen complies with the highest sanitation standards throughout their production process and is a facility that is inspected by both the USDA and MDARD.  Also Harvest Kitchen will be shifting their focus and expanding their menu options during this critical time. They will be offering more freezable family-style meals and an immune support category of prepared meals.  We have worked closely with the executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well.  Harvest Kitchen will also be reducing their delivery charges until the crisis passes, and they welcome any feedback and suggestions that will help them better serve you.  Please contact them at info@harvest-kitchen.com for more information or visit them at www.harvest-kitchen.com.

4. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, if you are interested in frozen beef, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order.  In general, they will be sold in bulk or by the cut, since we have USDA slaughtered beef.  Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BULK BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

5.  “IMMUNE BOOSTER” MULTIFARM SHARE NEXT WEEK:  If you are still interested in receiving more local produce and local food artisan products after this share’s distribution, please watch for another email in the next few days, since we are planning to continue providing you with healthy products with easy pick up.  If you are stocked up for the week or uninterested for now, please “like” us on Tantre Farm’s Facebook page, since we usually let you know where we are at and what we are up to, along with checking out our Partners’ Facebook sites.  Tantre produce will continue to be available at the People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops of AA, and Agricole in Chelsea  year round, and eventually hopefully at the Chelsea and Ann Arbor Farmers Markets this summer.  

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

“ The Brinery’s” JKC SPICY CARROT PICKLES:    This year instead of sauerkraut the Brinery is offering you something different, which can be used in a similar way as sauerkraut.  The Brinery has resurrected this fan favorite to bring a little Latin flavor to the Midwest.   Made with Tantre summer carrots, green jalapeno, garlic, and sea salt. This carrot jar is raw, unpasteurized, and traditionally fermented, so filled with flavor and beneficial bacteria.  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer/alum (2001+), David Klingenberger.  Their products are available in many stores in the area, including Whole Foods, Plum Market, Arbor Farms, Argus, and Agricole in Chelsea, etc.  For more information, please visit https://thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially a perfect topping for tacos, banh mi, sandwiches, and salads.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED and will last up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor.

“The Brinery’s” TEMPEH:  a traditional Indonesian soy product, that is made from fermented soybeans. The Brinery’s tempeh is made with non gmo organic soybeans, and is an excellent source of protein and fiber; contains some B vitamins which we need to help us break down and get energy from our food, as well as support our nervous system, and a good selection of minerals including calcium for strong bones and teeth, magnesium and phosphorus for the health of our bones, and zinc which is involved in wound healing.
-How to use:  good sauteed, fried, crumbled as a taco filling and on salads, great on sandwiches such as a tempeh reuben, and as your center of the plate protein main course for any meal!
-How to store: Thawed tempeh should be used within 5 days in your refrigerator.

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive ¼ pound of pea shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market year round or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use: use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” CURLY KALE:  these have a sweet, mild, cabbage flavor and are interchangeable with broccoli, mustard greens, and other hearty greens in recipes; highest protein content of all the cultivated vegetables; very high in calcium, iron, vitamins A and C, and good source of fiber and folic acid.  Goetz Farm is a 3-generation family farm in Riga, MI.  You can find their produce at both Argus Farm Stops, Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market, Downtown Farmington Farmer’s Market and Chelsea Farmer’s Market.  See https://www.localharvest.org/goetz-family-farm-M56215 for more information.
-How to use: for salads, soups, light cooking, and “kale chips”.
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” LETTUCE: rich in calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C; you will receive 1 of the following: Red/Green Leaf or Bib.
How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups.
How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

“Goetz Family Farm’s” SPINACH: crisp, dark green leaf–best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A and C; delicious flavor when juiced.
-How to use: toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, saute, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
-How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

“Harvest Kitchen’s” CHICKEN BONE BROTH: this nutrient dense superfood comes to you from Harvest Kitchen.  Rich in protein with a deep savory aroma and flavor.  Harvest Kitchen produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and the new Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale at info@harvest-kitchen.com.
-How to use: good foundation for soups, stews, gravies, and sauces, or sip on it’s own for a restorative tonic to maintain good health.
-How to store:  It will keep for 7 days in the fridge and 3 months in the freezer.

“Raterman Bread’s” SOURDOUGH BREAD: This Original Sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is a prebiotic and probiotic and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.

CARROTS:  You will receive 2 kinds of carrots in a plastic bag.  Chantenay (orange root that is shorter than some, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Napoli (a specialized orange variety with a sweet taste; 7” roots are cylindrical, smooth, and blunt with edible, green leaves).  
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:   Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; stores best in near freezing conditions around 32 degrees and 95% humidity.

ONIONS:  You will receive a mixed net bag of these 2 varieties of onions.  Copra (medium-sized, dark, yellow-skinned onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions; same sulfurous compounds that draw tears inhibit rot, so the more pungent the onion the longer it will store) and Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color and will store for six months or more under proper conditions).
-How to use: good in French onion soup, great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, grilled, roasted, stir-fried, etc.
-How to store:  can last for 3 to 6 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.  Just cut out the bad part, chop up the rest of the onion and freeze.

POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 4 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!), Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads), Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried), and  Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:   keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container; ideal temperature is 38-48 degrees with high humidity (80-90%).  A basement or very cool closet will work.  If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout.

DAIKON RADISH (White Korean): This daikon will be in a mixed bag with Watermelon Radish.  It looks like an overgrown white carrot, similar to a Daikon Radish, but blunt-tipped on end, with a lightly mild radish taste.
-How to use: chop or slice into small pieces and saute with olive, salt, and a sprinkle of turmeric; can be eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled; greens are also edible and can be used like any tender green.
-How to store:  not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to a week.This looks like an overgrown purple carrot with internal color ranging from pale purple to white with purple streaks; good, sweet, eating quality, and will be bagged with the beets.

WATERMELON RADISH:  This radish variety will be in a mixed bag with Daikon Radish; this heirloom Chinese variety is a large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta/pink flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste.
-How to use:  soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with your favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!  Lots and lots of ideas!

TANTRE FARM OVEN-ROASTED HARVEST VEGETABLES (Keep in mind, any combination of the following root vegetables will work.  Roasted veggies are standard at many a farmer’s meals.)
1 c. carrots, quartered or chunks
1/2 lb. unpeeled multi-colored potatoes, cut into chunks if large
3-4 onions, sliced
1 c. daikon radishes and/or watermelon radishes, cut into coins
3-4 Tbs. vegetable or olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
2 tsp. chopped sage or rosemary
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Combine any combination of vegetables above in large bowl, except parsley.  Drizzle oil over.  Sprinkle with garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper; toss gently to coat.  Bake for 30 minutes in 1 or 2 roasting pans or until vegetables are beginning to slightly brown. Turn the vegetables 2 or 3 times during cooking to prevent burning.  Then increase heat to 425° and add chopped parsley (or may be added as a fresh garnish at the very end), toss vegetables, and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring once, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned.

TANTRÉ FARM SLAW (A simple, easy salad!) Serves 4.
2 medium beets, grated
1 small kohlrabi
3 orange carrots, grated
1 daikon radish, grated
1 watermelon radish, grated
sesame or sunflower seeds, toasted
olive oil or toasted sesame oil
lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Grate vegetables into a bowl.  Toast sesame or sunflower seeds.  Add when cooled.  Add olive oil and lemon juice as a salad dressing to suit your taste.  Be careful of too much liquid.  The tartness of the lemon should be prominent.   Serve immediately or add some Brinery spicy carrots for an added zing along with some fresh pea shoots!

RICHARD’S WILTED GREENS WITH TOASTED SESAME SEEDS
1 bunch kale (spinach, beet greens, etc.)
1-2 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1/4 tsp sea salt (or to taste)
1-2 Tbsp toasted sesame oil or virgin olive oil
Blanch or steam whole bunched greens for 2-5 minutes.  Remove greens from pan, and place on a plate.  After cooled, pull leaves off stems and squeeze excess water out of leaves.  Place on cutting board and chop into bite-size pieces.  Put in serving bowl and toss with oil, seeds, and salt to taste.  Add any of your favorite roasted or steamed vegetables, such as carrots, tomatoes, summer squash, or onions.  Serve with potatoes or rice.  Enjoy!

DAIKON SOUP (https://pickledplum.com/daikon-chicken-soup-recipe/)  Serves 4.
1/2 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast (chopped bite-size)
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 tablespoons ginger (peeled and cut into strips)
1 cup daikon (chopped bite size)
4 cups low sodium chicken broth
2 cups spinach (roughly chopped)
2 tablespoons sake
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
In a pot over medium/high heat, add oil, ginger and chicken. Cook for 5 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. Add sake and soy sauce and cook for one minute.  Add chicken broth and daikon and bring to a boil. Lower heat, cover and simmer for 20-25 minutes, until daikon is tender.  Add spinach and cook for 5 minutes. Serve hot. (Easy to make vegetarian: just use vegetable broth and more vegetables instead of chicken) Delicious with Raterman’s bread or the Brinery’s spicy carrots!

POTATO LEEK SOUP WITH BACON AND FRESH DILL (from https://nourishedkitchen.com) Serves 4 to 6.
4 oz pasture-raised bacon (fried and crumbled with fat reserved)
4 leeks (rinsed well with white and light green parts sliced very thinly)
1 lb potatoes (scrubbed well and cubed)
1 quart fresh chicken broth or vegetable broth
2 bay leaves
2 cups fresh whole milk or plant-based milk
1 bunch fresh dill (chopped fine)
sea salt and freshly ground white pepper (to taste)
crème fraîche or sour cream (to serve) Optional!
In a heavy-bottomed soup pot, heat reserved bacon fat over a medium flame until melted and sizzling. Add the thinly sliced leeks to the melted bacon fat and fry about 5-6 minutes or so. Add one quart fresh chicken broth to the leeks and dump in the cubed potatoes and cover the pot. Cook the potatoes, leeks and broth together over a medium-low flame until the potatoes are softened  – about 30 minutes. Remove the soup and allow it to cool slightly, then pour milk into the soup pot, stirring in the fresh dill as you go.  Season with sea salt and white pepper as it suits you, then serve the soup with bacon and a dollop of crème fraîche or sour cream. Optional:  this easily can be made vegetarian or vegan without the bacon and substitute vegetable broth instead of chicken broth, and plant-based milk for whole milk. Delicious with Raterman’s bread!

ROASTED CARROTS WITH BONE BROTH AND MAPLE (https://www.pacificfoods.com/recipes/)
2 pounds whole carrots (stems removed)
1/4 cup  Chicken Bone Broth or vegetable broth
2 tbsp. melted ghee or butter
1/2 tsp. sea salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper
2 tbsp. maple syrup
Preheat oven to 450 degrees F and line a baking tray with parchment paper. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add carrots and bone broth and gently saute until carrots turn brightly colored, about 4-5 minutes. Carefully transfer carrots to lined baking tray. Drizzle with melted butter or ghee and sprinkle with sea salt and pepper. Roast sprouts for 25-30 minutes, or until carrots are tender.Remove from oven, drizzle with maple syrup, and enjoy!  Delicious on a bed of Goetz’s spinach.

QUICK PICKLED WATERMELON RADISH (https://omnivorescookbook.com/pickled-watermelon-radish/)
1 watermelon radish, peeled and shredded
1/4 cup rice vinegar (or apple cider vinegar)
2 tablespoons sugar (or maple syrup)
Combine apple cider vinegar and maple syrup in a large bowl. Mix well. Add radish and toss. Let sit for 10 minutes in the fridge.  Add a pinch of salt onto the radish and toss again right before serving.  Store the rest of the radish in an airtight jar for up to a week.  Delicious in a salad with the Brinery’s spicy carrots and Goetz’s lettuce.

WATERMELON RADISH WITH ROSEMARY BROWN BUTTER (https://itsavegworldafterall.com/watermelon-radish-with-rosemary-brown-butter/)  Serves 2.
2 watermelon radishes trimmed, scrubbed, and diced (skin on); about 2-3 cups diced
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp butter divided; can use salted or unsalted
1/8 tsp sea salt
1 tbsp fresh rosemary divided
2 tsp lemon zest
In a large skillet, heat the olive oil and 1 tbsp of the butter over medium heat. Add the watermelon radishes, sea salt, and 2 tsp of the fresh rosemary to the pan.  Cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the radishes are tender and slightly browned. It may take a few more minutes depending on your stovetop, so adjust the cooking time as needed.  Add the last tbsp of butter and the last tsp of rosemary, as well as the lemon zest, to the skillet. Cook for another couple of minutes. Remove from heat and serve warm!

SPINACH MASHED POTATOES (https://feedmephoebe.com/spinach-mashed-potatoes/)
2 pounds potatoes, peeled and diced
10 ounces spinach
1/2 cup vegetable or chicken stock
Sea salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
Place the potatoes in a large pot and cover with cold water by 1 inch. Bring to a boil and cook until the potatoes are fork tender, about 15 minutes. Fold in the spinach and cook for an additional minute. Drain the potato mixture and return to the pot along with ¼ cup stock, 1 teaspoon salt, and the oil. With a fork or masher, smash the potatoes until semi-smooth. Add more liquid if the potatoes seem too thick and dry. Fold in the butter and taste for seasoning.

KALE CHIPS WITH CHEESE (or Nutritonal Yeast)
1 bunch kale
2 Tbsp Parmesan cheese or nutritional yeast
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1 T lemon juice
1/2 tsp coconut oil
Wash and dry kale leaves and place in bowl.  Mix in lemon juice and coconut oil together massaging into kale leaves.  Mix separately Parmesan cheese (or nutritional yeast), sea salt and garlic powder.  Toss together with leaves.  Place in oven at 350 degrees on cookie sheet and bake for 3-5 minutes, then flip leaves over and bake another couple of minutes until crispy, but not brown.  Keep an eye on it, since it can burn very quickly.  Nutritious and delicious!

TEMPEH AND SPINACH STIR FRY WITH POTATO  (https://www.vegan.io/recipes/tempeh-and-spinach-stir-fry-with-potato)  Serves 4.
1/2-cup coconut milk
1 medium onion (thinly sliced)
20 oz potato (chopped into cubes)
1 tsp sea salt
10 oz spinach (washed and chopped)
1 tbsp sunflower oil
10 oz tempeh (chopped into cubes)
Heat water in a pot and boil the potato cubes for 5 minutes or until soft. Have this ready before you start cooking the other ingredients.  In a big frying pan, heat up oil and fry the onion for 2-3 minutes, stir occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the pan.  Add the cooked potato and the tempeh, fry for about 5 minutes, stir occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the pan.  Lastly, add the coconut milk and spinach, let it simmer for 2 minutes stirring occasionally. Season with salt.

2020 Midwinter Morning’s Dream Share

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
MIDWINTER MORNING’S DREAM SHARE
February 22, 2020

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

WELCOME TO THE MIDWINTER MORNING’S DREAM SHARE!
We find ourselves dreaming of a new growing season of small, green sprouts pushing through the moist, fertile soil as we spend these cold winter days in the glowing lights deep between the stacks of root cellar vegetables: carrots laden with beta carotene and anthocyanins, rainbow-colored potatoes, crispy radishes, and earthy smells of kohlrabi.  It is within this context that we find many days spent in the middle of piles of last year’s vegetables and the dream of this year’s future garden.  It is from this genesis that we bring to you this month’s food of the season with the collaboration of our good friends at Garden Works, the Brinery, Harvest Kitchen, Raterman Bread, and Second Spring Farm.  Thanks to our very small, hardworking winter crew of Jbird, Jimmy, and Harold for helping pull these shares together for you!  Hope you enjoy this community effort of food goodness!

**PLEASE READ THIS!!  We will be distributing your share in 2 containers: 1 3/4-bushel wooden crate and our usual half-bushel, summer share box.  If you are able, we would like you to return the boxes, so we can reuse them again.  You may want to bring your own bags, coolers, or boxes to transfer everything on Saturday, so you don’t have to remember to return the boxes. The other option is for you to take the boxes and just return them to the Food Hub porch or Tantre Farm at another time, or to the Ann Arbor Farmers Market on a Saturday morning when it is convenient for you.  If you are not able to return them, that’s okay too.   At 9 PM tonight you will receive an automated Pick Up Reminder email that will describe your chosen Pick Up location in more detail.  Please ask for help if you need any help loading your share, since we will have extra farm crew to help at the Hub and the Farm. Also, if you haven’t made your final payment yet, please make sure that your check or cash (in a labeled envelope) goes into the CSA Payment Envelope at each Distribution Site on Saturday. All CSA members at Argus and Agricole will need to mail their payment to the farm, since we are not able to pick up payments at these sites. Please give Deb a courtesy email/text/call at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site on time, so we know what your situation is, so we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

Thanks for sharing our midwinter dream with you as we prepare for the warmth of spring and summer.  

–Deb and Richard

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1.  INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE:  Tantre Farm is looking for self-motivated interns/apprentices with a positive attitude and good work ethic, who would like to work on a bio-intensive, small-scale, organic farm. Responsibilities may include soil preparation, planting, cultivation, cover cropping strategies, harvesting, and marketing. They need to be willing to work 8-10 hours/day and be willing to live semi-communally with some cooking and cleaning responsibilities since this is a work-learning experience.  We offer room, board, and a negotiable stipend dependent on experience and performance.  Basic season is from April through November, but we will consider anyone willing to work at least 3 or more of these months.  We do have some part-time jobs available as well, but it is a bit more seasonal and it is without room and board.   Please spread the word and have those interested review our description on our website and fill out an application:  http://www.tantrefarm.com/internships.  Please have them text Deb at 734-385-6748 or email us at info@tantrefarm.com.  Thanks for your help in spreading the word.  

2. SUMMER CSA 2020:  If you are interested in our Summer CSA, please sign up for $630 on our online registration at http://tantrefarm.csasignup.com.   Also, remember that you can get a $10 discount if you use the Coupon Code “2020 EARLY BIRD” on the Check Out page anytime before February 29. The Early Bird discount is offered through the last day of February in honor of National CSA Day on February 28. Please let us know if you have any problems, and we will help you figure it out.

3.  4th Annual Chelsea CSA Fair: 5 Healthy Towns is hosting a CSA Fair at Agricole Farm Stop on Feb. 23 from 11 PM to 2 PM.  Please come visit Tantre Farm’s table in Chelsea to make your Early Bird payment for our Summer CSA for $620, while you’re there.   These early payments are really helpful towards buying seeds, repairing equipment, and purchasing other farming supplies. This is a great time to join the festivities, order a hot drink, and sign up for our Summer CSA. Hope to see you there on Sunday!

4. HARVEST KITCHEN “PREPARED FOOD” OPPORTUNITIES:
If you’re too busy some days to find the time to prepare a healthy, tasty meal for your family, or there are weeks when you would enjoy a delicious, prepared meal by professional chefs, then you may be interested in ordering a meal or single item dish from Harvest Kitchen’s website: http://harvest-kitchen.com. If you’re interested in delicious, farm-to-table foods delivered to your home, your office, or picked up in some other convenient location, then check on the various meal plan options listed. Harvest Kitchen also is focused in finding businesses interested in corporate wellness, who would like to offer healthy lunches to their employees, so please let us know if your office or business is interested in learning more about this.   We have worked closely with our executive chef, Magdiale, to continue to consult and advise as Harvest Kitchen works in close partnership with Tantre Farm’s seasonal produce list. All dietary needs can be accommodated as well. If you would like to hear more specific details, please send us an email with HARVEST KITCHEN in the subject line or go directly to their website above.

5. GRASS-FED BEEF:  Just to let you know, if you are interested in frozen beef, we still have Tantre Farm pasture-raised beef available for sale, so please feel free to send us an email order.  In general, they will be sold in bulk or by the cut, since we have USDA slaughtered beef.  Please let us know if you would like the Beef Pricing Guide sent to you. Pick up can be arranged at the Food Hub or Tantre Farm, but by appointment only. Please email us with BEEF in the Subject line to get specific details.

6.  EXTRA PRODUCE AVAILABLE:  If you are still interested in potatoes, carrots, radishes, onions, kohlrabi, or spinach (didn’t have enough for the shares yet) after this share distribution, please contact us at Tantre Farm or visit us at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market.  We will continue to set up at the Market every Saturday (as long as it’s not too cold).  Market starts at 8 AM and ends at 2 PM for these “winter hours”.   If you have “liked” us on Tantre Farm’s Facebook page, we usually let you know when we are coming and what we are bringing.  The People’s Food Coop, the Argus Farm Stops of AA, and Agricole in Chelsea also continue to carry much of our produce throughout the winter and early spring.  

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

BEETS:  This beet variety will be in a mixed bag with White Daikon and Watermelon Radish.  Red Ace Beets (round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor when eaten raw or cooked).  
-How to use: roots good in juices, soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store:  store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

“Raterman Bread’s “ SOURDOUGH BREAD: This Original Sourdough bread is provided by Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, Nick Raterman of Raterman Bread, using non-GMO flour. The sourdough is extremely high hydration and is made fresh with no preservatives or additives. Other varieties and sizes are available at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and Webster Farmers Market on Sundays.  You can reach Nick at Nick.Raterman@gmail.com or on Facebook @RatermanBread.

“Harvest Kitchen’s” CARROT CAKE: Harvest Kitchen (www.harvest-kitchen.com) has created this custom-made, Carrot Cake (featuring Tantre carrots and blended with eggs, flour, oil, spices, pecans, etc. and topped with a cream cheese frosting with Calder cream cheese, sugar, vanilla, and butter). Harvest Kitchen produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, both Argus Farm Stops, and the new Agricole in Chelsea.  For more details about meal plans or gift ideas, contact Magdiale at info@harvest-kitchen.com.
-How to use: Cut and serve!  Yum!!
-How to store: It will keep for 2-3 days on the counter at room temperature or 5-6 days in the fridge.

CARROTS (Orange, Red, Purple):  You will receive 4 kinds of carrots in 2 plastic bags.  Chantenay (orange root that is shorter than some, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Napoli (a specialized orange variety with a sweet taste; 7” roots are cylindrical, smooth, and blunt with edible, green leaves).   Malbec (smooth, uniform 10″ long red roots with consistent, rich red internal color for multiple uses) and Purple Haze (bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:  Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; stores best in near freezing conditions around 32 degrees and 95% humidity.

KOHLRABI (Kossak):  This is a giant variety of kohlrabi that lasts a long time in storage and is NOT woody on the inside.  It can grow up to 8-12 inches in diameter; delicious bulbous member of the cabbage family, that grows above ground; green skin and sweet, crisp, apple-white flesh; tubers and leaves are good sources of vitamins C and A, calcium, potassium, and fiber.  The outer skin should be cut off before you eat it, since it’s very fibrous.  It can also be cut off in sections and brushed with lemon juice to keep the flesh from oxidizing on the unused parts.
-How to use: absolutely delicious raw in slaws (see newsletter recipe), or sliced as sticks with dip; also good cut in chunks, steamed and then mashed with potatoes, added to soups or stews or roasted.
-How to store: keep in cold storage for up to 4 months

“Garden Works Farm’s” PEA SHOOTS: Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.  You will receive ¼ pound of pea shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C and calcium) from Garden Works Organic Farm.  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, and wheatgrass, sunflower shoots and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Visit Rob MacKercher at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market year round or contact gardenworksorganic@gmail.com for more information.
-How to use:  use as a salad, blended with chopped radishes, turnips, and cabbage, excellent garnish as a soup, so yummy and tender!
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

ONIONS:  You will receive a mixed net bag of these 2 varieties of onions.  Copra (medium-sized, dark, yellow-skinned onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions; same sulfurous compounds that draw tears inhibit rot, so the more pungent the onion the longer it will store) and Red Zeppelin (medium to large, globe-shaped bulbs with deep red color and will store for six months or more under proper conditions).
-How to use: good in French onion soup, great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, grilled, roasted, stir-fried, etc.
-How to store:  can last for 3 to 6 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.  Just cut out the bad part, chop up the rest of the onion and freeze.

POTATOES:  You will receive a net bag of 2 varieties of potatoes including Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!) and Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried).  You will also receive a net bag of a larger amount of Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried).
-How to store:  keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container; ideal temperature is 38-48 degrees with high humidity (80-90%).  A basement or very cool closet will work.  If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout.

DAIKON RADISH (White Korean): This daikon will be in a mixed bag with Beets and Watermelon Radish.  It looks like an overgrown white carrot, similar to a Daikon Radish, but blunt-tipped on end, with a lightly mild radish taste.
-How to use: chop or slice into small pieces and saute with olive, salt, and a sprinkle of turmeric; can be eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled; greens are also edible and can be used like any tender green.
-How to store: not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to a week.This looks like an overgrown purple carrot with internal color ranging from pale purple to white with purple streaks; good, sweet, eating quality, and will be bagged with the beets.

WATERMELON RADISH:  This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag with daikon radish and beets; this heirloom Chinese variety is a large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta/pink flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste.
-How to use:  soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with your favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

“The Brinery’s” SAUERKRAUT:   You will be receiving a jar of Up North: cabbage, carrots, parsnips (carrots and parsnips are from Second Spring Farm).  The Brinery’s sauerkrauts are raw, unpasteurized, and traditionally fermented. It is a cornerstone of health, both mentally and physically.  Steeped in the ancient art and necessity of fermentation, every jar carries the culture onward.  Filled with flavor and beneficial bacteria, your microbiome will thank you!  The Brinery is a local foods business at the Washtenaw Food Hub, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer, David Klingenberger.  For more information, please visit www.thebrinery.com.  
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially meat dishes, salads, roasted veggies, or sandwiches.  
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED up to 3 months or longer depending on how you like the flavor, since it will get stronger with more age. *NOTE: This sauerkraut jar has NOT been canned, so store in refrigerator.

“Second Spring Farm’s” BUTTERNUT SQUASH:  light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh.  Tantre’s squash has sadly dwindled away, so thanks to our former intern (2003)-turned-farmer, Reid Johnston, of Second Spring Farm (www.secondspringfarm.net). He is providing you with his certified organic butternut from Cedar, MI.
-How to use:  bake, steam, roast until tender in chunks, thin wedges or in half; mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store:  Keep for several months (depending on the variety) at 45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!  Lots and lots of ideas!

TANTRE FARM OVEN-ROASTED HARVEST VEGETABLES (Keep in mind, any combination of the following root vegetables will work.  Roasted veggies are standard at many Tantre Farm meals.)
1 c. beets, quartered or chunks
1 c. carrots, quartered or chunks
1/2 lb. unpeeled multi-colored potatoes, cut into chunks if large
3-4 onions, sliced
1 c. daikon radishes and/or watermelon radishes, cut into coins
1 c. winter squash, cut into chunks
3-4 Tbs. vegetable or olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
2 tsp. chopped sage or rosemary
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Combine any combination of vegetables above in large bowl, except parsley.  Drizzle oil over.  Sprinkle with garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper; toss gently to coat.  Bake for 30 minutes in 1 or 2 roasting pans or until vegetables are beginning to slightly brown. Turn the vegetables 2 or 3 times during cooking to prevent burning.  Then increase heat to 425° and add chopped parsley (or may be added as a fresh garnish at the very end), toss vegetables, and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring once, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned.

TANTRÉ FARM SLAW (A simple, easy salad!) Serves 4.
2 medium beets, grated
3 large red and orange carrots, grated
1 watermelon radish, grated
1 daikon radish, grated
2-3 scallions or 1 red onion, chopped (optional)
sesame or sunflower seeds, toasted
olive oil or toasted sesame oil
lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Grate vegetables into a bowl.  Chop scallions, if desired, and add to bowl.  Toast sesame or sunflower seeds.  Add when cooled.  Add olive oil and lemon juice as a salad dressing to suit your taste.  Be careful of too much liquid.  The tartness of the lemon should be prominent.   Serve immediately or add some Brinery sauerkraut for an added zing along with some fresh pea shoots!

CARROT PUDDING (from AllRecipes.com by Judith Nees) 
1.5 pounds carrots, chopped 
2 eggs 
3/4 cups white sugar 
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 
3/4 teaspoons baking powder 
1/4 cup all-purpose flour 
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Steam or boil carrots until tender; mash. In an electric mixer with whisk attachment or by hand, beat eggs into carrots, one at a time. Beat in sugar, vanilla and baking powder. Fold in flour. Pour into a 2 quart baking dish. Bake in preheated oven 30 minutes, until puffed and set.

CARROT AND DAIKON SLAW (Makes 2 servings)
4 carrots, peeled and cut into 1/8 in. julienne (matchsticks)
1 six-inch daikon radish, peeled & cut into julienne
1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
2 tsp. canola oil
1 tsp. unsalted rice vinegar
1 tsp. sea salt
Combine all ingredients in bowl, cover and let stand at least 1/2 hour.  Season to taste, and serve.    Add a dollop of Brinery sauerkraut for an extra zing along with some fresh pea shoots!

STIR-FRIED DAIKON (from Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables by John Peterson) Serves 4.
2 tablespoons peanut oil
1/4 cup sliced scallions or 1 small onion
3 medium daikon radishes, thinly sliced (about 3 cups)
10–12 red radishes, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon hot chili oil or more to taste (optional)
2 Tbsp finely chopped parsley
Heat the peanut oil in a wok over high heat. Add the scallions; stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the daikon and red radishes; stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the water and continue stir-frying until all the water has all evaporated.  Add the soy sauce, sugar, and chili oil, mixing everything together vigorously and cooking for 30 seconds more. Immediately transfer to a serving platter.  Serve hot.  May garnish with finely chopped parsley.  This makes a great meal with teriyaki salmon and a bowl of rice and Harvest Kitchen carrot cake!

EASY BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP (from www.onceuponachef.com by Jennifer Segal)  Serves 6-8
7-8 cups (2 1/2 lbs) pre-cut butternut squash
1 red bell pepper, roughly chopped
1 medium yellow onion, roughly chopped
3 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
7 cups water
1 Tbsp salt
2 Tbsp sugar, plus more if necessary
1/2 cup heavy cream
Fresh thyme sprigs, for garnish (optional)
Combine all of the ingredients except for the heavy cream in a large soup pot.  Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer for 35 minutes.  Using a hand-held immersion blender, puree the soup until silky smooth.  (Alternatively, cool the soup slightly, then puree in a blender in batches, making sure to leave the hole in the lid open to allow the steam to escape.)  Stir in the heavy cream and bring to a simmer.  Taste and adjust seasoning (depending on the sweetness of the vegetables, you may need up to a tablespoon more sugar).  Ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with fresh chopped thyme or thyme sprigs, if desired.  Delicious with Raterman’s bread!

SCALLOPED SQUASH AND POTATOES (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure)
3 cups butternut squash, peeled and cut into chunks
2 cups diced potatoes
1/3 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped cooked ham
1/4 cup flour
1 Tbsp chopped parsley
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1 1/3 cups whole milk
2 Tbsp butter
Place half of squash and potatoes in a greased 1 1/2-quart casserole dish.  Sprinkle half the amount of ham and onions.  Whisk together flour, parsley, salt, pepper, and nutmeg with milk.  Pour half the mixture over vegetables.  Dot with half the butter.  Repeat layers.  Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  Uncover and bake 10-15 minutes, or until vegetables tender.

SPICY SQUASH BROWNIES (from Mad Mares Cookbook)
1 cup cooked and mashed winter squash
1 1/4 cup whole wheat or unbleached flour
1 cup brown sugar, firmly packed
1 tsp baking powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg,
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup buttermilk or sour milk
1/4 cup oil
1 tsp vanilla
2 eggs, well beaten
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Combine all ingredients and beat well.  Pour into greased 13×9-inch pan.  Bake at 375 degrees for 30-40 minutes.

MIDNIGHT SUNSET: A GINGER AND BEET JUICE COOLER (from Learning to Eat Locally)  Makes 1/2 gallon.
1 qt cooking water from 4-6 beets cooked in 2 qts water (strain in a sieve if grainy)
1 qt water
1 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 cup lemon juice
1 1/2 Tbsp coarsely chopped ginger
Ginger ale (optional)
In a gallon jug or plastic juice container, combine beet juice, water (reserving 1 cup), sugar, lemon juice, stirring until sugar is dissolved.  In a small saucepan, bring the reserved cup of water and ginger to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium, and simmer until water is reduced to about half of its original volume.  Strain ginger liquid into beet juice, discarding ginger pieces.  Cover and chill in refrigerator for at least an hour.  Shake before serving, and pour over ice.  If you are using ginger ale, pour equal parts ale and Midnight Sunset in each glass, or combine them to taste.  Throw in a handful of frozen Locavorious blueberries for added flavor!

STEAMED KOHLRABI WITH LEMON BUTTER (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure)  Serves 4
1 bulb kohlrabi
2 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 clove garlic, minced
1 Tbsp minced fresh parsley
1-2 Tbsp minced lemon balm
Salt and pepper, to taste
Trim kohlrabi, but do not peel.  Steam over simmering water, covered, for about 40 minutes or until tender.  Cool slightly, then peel and chop.  In saucepan, melt butter over medium heat; stir in lemon juice, garlic, and parsley.  Cook 2 minutes.  Add kohlrabi and lemon balm; toss to coat.  Season with salt and pepper.

KOHLRABI VEGETABLE STEW (from The Rolling Prairie Cookbook by Nancy O’Connor)
2-3 medium kohlrabi (maybe a quarter or half of a giant one)
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, cut in slivers
3 medium carrots, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
2 medium potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
1 cup peeled chopped tomatoes
4 cups vegetable broth
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp salt
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp molasses
Peel kohlrabi bulb and cut into large chunks. Set aside.  Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat.  Add onions and saute for several minutes.  Add kohlrabi bulb chunks, carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, broth, bay leaf, oregano, salt, pepper, molasses and mustard.  Turn up heat to medium-high and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until veggies are not quite tender.  Add kohlrabi (or collard/kale) leaves after de-ribbing leaves and cut into thin strips.  Then simmer, uncovered for another 10 minutes, or until veggies are just cooked.