2018: Week 7, July 8 – 14

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #7
July 8-14, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares. If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA or SPICY GREENS: Fri/Sat CSA members will receive Arugula (also known as “wild rocket”; an aromatic, bright salad green with more deeply lobed leaves and a peppery mustard flavor) and Wed CSA members will receive Spicy Greens (a blend of arugula, Kyona/Mizuna, and red and green mustards). See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

YELLOW BEANS or BROCCOLI: Wed. CSA members will receive Isar (beautiful, yellow, fillet bean with excellent flavor; use raw in salads, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, etc.) and Fri/Sat CSA members will receive Green Broccoli (deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.). We just didn’t have enough of both.

BEETS AND GREENS: You will receive Red Ace (round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and medium-tall, red-veined green leaves) or Chioggia (Italian variety with leaves all green and pink-striped stems; root has cherry red, candy-striped flesh and has a sweet flavor) or Golden Beets (orange skin with rich gold interior; mild, sweet flavor when cooked). See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.
You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 5 options:
-Oregano: member of the mint family and is similar to marjoram, but not as sweet and more pungent flavor and aroma.
-Marjoram: a small and oval-shaped leaf, which is light green with a grayish tint. When fresh it is spicy, bitter, and slightly pungent with camphor-like notes, so often added to fish sauces, salads and dressings, tomato-based sauces, grilled lamb; goes well with vegetables including cabbages, potatoes, eggplant, and beans.
-French Sorrel: slightly tart, lemon-flavored green shaped like spinach; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces.
-Chives: mild, onion-flavored herb with long, slender, hollow leaves.
-Italian Flat-leaf Parsley: flat, glossy, dark green leaves have a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh.
*Genovese Basil—All shares will receive 1 basil clump this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top.

KALE: Wed. members will receive Red Curly (well ruffled green leaves with red stems) and Fri/Sat. members will receive Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”). See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GREEN ONIONS (also called “Scallions”): young shoots of yellow bulb onions with long green stalks and milder taste than bulb onions See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NEW POTATOES (Red Norland): smooth, red skin and white flesh; great baked, boiled, or roasted.
-How to use: New potatoes are just young potatoes that haven’t had time to convert their sugar fully into starch and often have a crisp, waxy texture and thin, underdeveloped wispy skins, so are good boiled or pan-roasted, but particularly suited for potato salad, since they hold their shape well after being cut and cooked.
-How to store: Refrigerate new potatoes if not used within 2-3 days, but use up sometime during the 1st or 2nd week of receiving them. **These potatoes have not been cured, so will not last as long as “cured” potatoes, which should not be refrigerated, since low temperatures convert starch to sugars and may turn dark if cooked.

SUMMER SQUASH/ZUCCHINI: You will receive some variety of Green or Yellow Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits) or Slick Pik Summer Squash (long, yellow straight neck with good flavor). See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor.
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. SUMMER WORK PARTY/OPEN HOUSE Sunday, July 15 between 1-4 p.m. This day often tends to be hot and sunny. However, we’ll have lots of water play for the kids and shade-related activities for the adults, such as cleaning garlic. For those more adventurer-gardener types, we may weed and harvest some produce. Members are encouraged to bring family and friends to Tantré Farm to see the farm with wagon rides and farm tours. This is a completely voluntary event, so you can also come just for the fun, such as listening to live music or picking a pint of raspberries. Please feel free to bring a snack or refreshment to pass. More details to come!

2. KIDS’ COOKING CLASS on JULY 22 from 1 to 3 PM: PLAY with your FOOD! Leave behind the summer bustle to celebrate summer produce with your child. Personal Chef Allison Anastasio Zeglis, from www.lastbitechef.com, will show you how to approach a CSA box, family style. Using a few classic techniques that can be adapted to a variety of vegetables, cook your way through a share box with your child. Get hands on experience as a dynamic duo tackling cooking projects and then enjoy eating them together at the end of the class. Please register with your NAME and your child’s NAME, child’s AGE, PHONE, and EMAIL ADDRESS. Please bring $10/person, but if financial difficulties, please let us know, and we can try to help. More details coming!

3. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
-MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
-Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
-Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
-Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 AM to 7 PM
-Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
-Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
-Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
-Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
-NEW! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

COOL AS A CUCUMBER
The cucumber, a member of the gourd family, is a distant relative to pumpkins, squash, and melons. It is said to have originated in the Middle East. It has been eaten as an unripe fruit, since Biblical times. As a relative of melons, cucumbers are very high in water and so very refreshing, especially during these hot days of summer. They are 94% water and also contain small amounts of vitamins A, C, and a few minerals. For some, however, cucumbers are hard to digest, so seedless and “burpless” cucumbers have been bred to prevent this problem.

Our cucumbers are not waxed (to keep them from rotting for a longer shelf life) like ordinary cucumbers found in the store, so skin and all can be eaten. The skins are rich in vitamin E, so they are also known as an effective skin conditioner. Also, some of the nutrients, such as vitamin A, iron, and potassium are lost when the skin is removed. The cucumber skins, besides being good for human skin, also contain silicon and chlorophyll, making them well worth eating. If you do wish to remove the skins, you may try making “cukesicles” for the kids. At Tantré Farm, sometimes we peel the skins off and slice the cucumbers in half lengthwise making a long, slender, cooling treat we call “cukesicles”.

The cucumber is a non-starchy, alkaline “cooling” vegetable. It is an excellent diuretic, helping the kidneys in waste elimination. Cucumbers contain the enzyme, erepsin, which helps digest proteins and destroys worms. The cucumber’s potassium content makes it useful for high and low blood pressure.
Cucumbers deteriorate very quickly, because of their high water content, so it is important to store them in a sealed plastic bag in refrigerator crisper drawer. Keep them away from tomatoes, apples, or citrus, which give off ethylene gas, and can speed up their deterioration.

Most people enjoy cucumbers raw or pickled in salads or sandwiches, but sometimes a cuke can be julienned, sauteed, or baked. Try cucumber rounds topped with egg or tuna salad, or simply with salt. Make refrigerator pickles, which are very simple and delicious. They are featured in a number of ethnic dishes.

Although not as nutritious as most of the garden vegetables, cucumbers are very satisfying and help us replenish fluids and minerals lost in perspiration, leaving us as “cool as a cucumber”. They are very reviving on a hot summer’s day.

RECIPES

COLD CUCUMBER LEEK SOUP
This is a creamy soup made without cream, using potatoes instead for body. For a lighter soup, you can leave out the potatoes. There are a number of different vegetable variations that are also good. See variations below.

3/4 cup chopped onions or scallions, thinly sliced
1 large clove garlic, coarsely chopped
1 Tbsp oil
1-2 cups potato, chopped into 1-inch pieces
2 cups thinly sliced cucumber
2 Tbsp dill, chopped fine and divided
2 cups broth (should just cover vegetables, may need a little more)
1-2 cups cold buttermilk or plain yogurt
Saute leeks and garlic in the oil, just until wilted and not yet browned. Add potato and cucumber. Stir a bit. Add 1 tablespoon chopped dill. Just barely cover vegetables with broth and bring to a simmer. Let simmer until potatoes are very tender, but not falling apart, about 20 minutes or so. When the vegetables are very soft, let the mixture cool. Once it’s cool, puree vegetables and broth together with an immersion blender, regular blender, food processor, etc., adding the remaining 1 tablespoon dill. Check the seasoning; add salt and pepper if you like. Chill the vegetable puree. Before serving stir in the amount of buttermilk that you like. I find that 2/3 vegetable puree to 1/3 buttermilk is about right at our house. Garnish with more dill.

Recipe variations follow:
*Summer squash soup: Substitute zucchini or yellow squash or any summer squash for the cucumber and potato combo. We eat this a lot and love it on hot days. With some bread and cheese, it makes a great meal.

**Summer borscht: For the main vegetables, use a combination of 1/3 potatoes, 1/3 beets, or chard stems). Can also throw in a couple of carrots or turnips. I often use leftover beets that I’ve already roasted for this–just adding them at the end of the simmering time. Even people who don’t like beets love this soup.

***Vichyssoise: You can use just potatoes and leeks as the vegetables to make French vichyssoise. Don’t use a food processor to puree it though as it will become gluey. You may want to use chives instead of the dill and replace the buttermilk with either milk or half and half.

SQUASH AND BASIL SALAD (Serves 4-6.)
3-4 medium summer squash, shredded in food processor
2-3 Tbsp. fresh basil, chopped
3-4 Tbsp. Parmesan cheese, freshly grated
1-2 Tbsp. minced garlic, chopped
Dressing:
¼ cup (60 ml) red wine vinegar
¼ cup (60 ml) olive oil
½ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. pepper
¼ tsp. sugar
Toss together the squash, basil, cheese, and garlic into salad bowl. Combine dressing ingredients and pour over the salad. Mix, chill 1 hour, and serve. Best eaten the same day. May be served with lettuce and green onions.

2018: Week 6, July 1 – 7

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #6
July 1-7, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.
We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares. If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA (Sylvetta): also known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

**GENOVESE BASIL: Everyone will receive Basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves; traditionally used in pesto; we supply it with root attached, so it will last longer when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. **You will all receive Basil fairly consistently from now until the first frost in September or October, so plan on freezing, drying, or making pesto, so that you will enjoy its summer aroma all winter long. If you don’t think you can use it every week, then just don’t take it. See feature article in this newsletter and recipes in the “A to Z” Cookbook and Tantre Farm website.

FAVA BEANS: also called faba bean, horse bean, or broad bean; the pod is inedible raw and looks like a large bean pod; the bean seed resembles a lima bean with a tart, pungent flavor; fresh fava beans should be shelled from pod if skin seems tough, but bean seed can be eaten raw. The pod when young can be cooked, but when mature and firmer, the bean is the edible part. See recipes below:
-To skin fava beans: Blanch for 1 minute, then drain and cool. With your thumbnail, pull open the sprout end and squeeze the bean out of its skin. This link shows 5 ways to prepare favas: http://www.thekitchn.com/5-fantastic-ways-to-cook-fava-beans-190674
-How to use: Stew skinned beans in a little butter, oil or cream seasoned with savory, thyme or sage. Sauté with other vegetables and toss with pasta. Good in soups. Lots of recipes on the Internet!
-How to store: Store fresh, unshelled beans in the refrigerator up to a week; once shelled, blanched and skinned, favas can be frozen in plastic containers for longer storage; shelled beans are best used within a few days. See “Beans” for recipes in the A to Z Cookbook, if you have it, and also in this newsletter. Delicious!

RED ACE BEETS AND GREENS: round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor and medium-tall, red-veined green leaves.
-How to use: greens can be substituted for spinach and chard in recipes; roots good in soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store: separate roots from leaves and store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; store greens wrapped in damp cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

BROCCOLI (Wed. members only): deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable.
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sauteed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week.

CABBAGE (Flat Dutch—Fri./Sat. Members only): 7-inch deep, solid, flat heads, sweet cabbage with green leaves that are tender and crisp with a good amount of vitamins A and C, calcium, potassium, and magnesium; good for storage and making sauerkraut.
-How to use: grated or chopped raw in salads; stir-fried; steamed for 5-7 minutes in wedges; boiled with a chopped onion for 5 minutes and then added to mashed potatoes; and put in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate in hydrator drawer without removing any outer leaves (a plastic bag will help retain moisture, but is not necessary) for 2 weeks to 2 months.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh.
-How to use: raw or pickled in salads or sandwiches, can also be julienned, sautéed, or baked.
-How to store: store them in a sealed plastic bag in refrigerator crisper drawer for up to a week; use up leftovers as soon as possible.

NO HERB BUNCH THIS WEEK! Most of our herbs are taking longer to grow back, so we are letting our smaller patches of herbs recuperate, but you will receive Genovese Basil.
KALE: You will receive both Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”). See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GREEN ONIONS (also called “Scallions”): young shoots of yellow bulb onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants, high in potassium and source of vitamins C and B-6. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUGAR SNAP PEAS: flat-round pod of edible-pod pea; often lighter green than the shelling pea pod. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SPINACH: You will receive a bunch of this crisp, dark green leaf shaped like an arrow– best eaten raw or with minimal cooking to obtain the beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C; delicious flavor when juiced. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUMMER SQUASH/ZUCCHINI: You will receive some variety of Green or Yellow Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits) or Slick Pik Summer Squash (long, yellow straight neck with good flavor).
-How to use: use in salads, dips, grilled, casseroles, stuffed, or mashed with butter and seasonings.
-How to store: store in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. FAMILY FARM HIKE on July 6: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm on Friday, June 26, at 2 PM. We’ll use all our senses as we take an approx. 45-60 minute hike with CSA member, Alisse Portnoy, who teaches at the University of Michigan. She and her daughter are in their ninth year of once-a-week, long visits to the farm. They look forward to sharing some of its treasures and treasure spots with you. Meet at the picnic tables behind Main House at 2 pm.

2. SUMMER WORK PARTY/OPEN HOUSE Sunday, July 15 between 1-4 p.m. This day often tends to be hot and sunny. However, we’ll have lots of water play for the kids and shade-related activities for the adults, such as cleaning garlic. For those more adventurer-gardener types, we will be weeding the herb and flower garden and other patches in the fields, and maybe even some harvesting! Members are encouraged to bring family and friends to Tantré Farm to see the farm decked out in its summer finery, for wagon ride farm tours, and for getting to know fellow community members. This is a completely voluntary event, so you can also come just for the fun, such as listening to live music or picking a pint of raspberries. As usual a potluck is included, so please feel free to bring a snack or refreshment. More details to come!

3. KIDS’ COOKING CLASS on JULY 22 (time TBA): PLAY with your FOOD! Leave behind the summer bustle to celebrate summer produce with your child. Personal Chef Allison Anastasio Zeglis, from www.lastbitechef.com, will show you how to approach a CSA box, family style. Using a few classic techniques that can be adapted to a variety of vegetables, cook your way through a crop share box with your child. Get hands on experience as a dynamic duo tackling cooking projects and then enjoy eating them together at the end of the class. Please register with your NAME and your child’s NAME, PHONE, and EMAIL ADDRESS.

4. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm, we could really use the extra help. Please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark.
5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page. Please always email ahead to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) NO PICK UP HERE THIS WEEK!
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
NEW! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipe” after it, and many recipe ideas will pop up. Have fun searching! Lots and lots of ideas!

CUCUMBER, BEET, & SCALLION SALAD (Serves 4 to 6.)
1 bunch beets (about 1 ¾ lbs.), tops trimmed to 1-inch
2 large cucumbers, peeled, halved, seeded, & sliced ¼-inch
1 tsp. kosher salt
½ cup light or regular sour cream
½ cup thinly sliced green onions
2 Tbs. red wine vinegar
1 Tbs. prepared white horseradish
1 Tbs. white sugar
¼ tsp. salt and ¼ tsp. freshly ground pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Wrap each beet in a sheet of foil. Bake for 1 to 1 ½ hours, until the beets are easily pierced with a small knife. Unwrap. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine the cucumbers and 1-teaspoon kosher salt; cover with plastic wrap. Set a plate on top, weight with a heavy can, and refrigerate for about 1 hour. Rinse the cucumbers, drain, and put into a medium bowl. When the beets are cool enough to handle, peel, quarter, and cut crosswise into ¼-inch slices. Add to the cucumbers. In a small bowl, combine the sour cream, scallions, vinegar, horseradish, sugar, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Add to the beet mixture and toss until mixed. Spoon into a bowl and serve at room temperature or slightly chilled.

KALE CHIPS WITH CHEESE
1 bunch Kale
1/2 tsp Garlic Powder
2 T Parmesan Cheese or Nutritional Yeast
1 T Lemon Juice
1/2 tsp Coconut Oil
1 tsp Sea Salt
Wash and dry Kale leaves and place in bowl. Mix in lemon juice and coconut oil together massaging into kale leaves. Mix separately Parmesan Cheese (or Nutritional Yeast), sea salt and garlic powder. Toss together with leaves. Place in dehydrator at 118 degrees for 12 – 18 hours. Can be stored in food safe container in cupboard ~ if they last that long!

SHAVED SUMMER SQUASH SALAD (from Bon Apetit, June 2011)
As a side note, Richard from Tantre Farm has a recipe in this same issue of Bon Apetit, p. 65, for “Parmesan Peppers”!
3 Tbsp whole almonds
1 lb summer squash or zucchini
2 1/2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 minced garlic clove
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Few handfuls of arugula (or dandelion greens, beet greens, lettuce)
Pecorino cheese

Roast almonds and coarsely crush. Meanwhile, trim the ends off the squash/zucchini. Using a vegetable peeler, thinly slice the squash lengthwise into strips and transfer to a large bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, and salt to taste. Pour dressing over squash. Let stand for a few minutes, then add a few handfuls of arugula or other green. Shave a little Pecorino cheese over the squash and toss. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Garnish with crushed almonds.

2018: Week 5, June 24 – 30

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #5
June 24-30, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares. If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

**GENOVESE BASIL: Everyone will receive Basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves; traditionally used in pesto; we supply it with root attached, so it will last longer when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. **You will all receive Basil fairly consistently from now until the first frost in September or October, so plan on freezing, drying, or making pesto, so that you will enjoy its summer aroma all winter long. If you don’t think you can use it every week, then just don’t take it. See feature article in this newsletter and recipes in the “A to Z” Cookbook and Tantre Farm website.

FAVA BEANS: also called faba bean, horse bean, or broad bean; the pod is inedible raw and looks like a large bean pod; the bean seed resembles a lima bean with a tart, pungent flavor; fresh fava beans should be shelled from pod if skin seems tough, but bean seed can be eaten raw. The pod when young can be cooked, but when mature and firmer, the bean is the edible part. See recipe link below:
-To skin fava beans: Blanch for 1 minute, then drain and cool. With your thumbnail, pull open the sprout end and squeeze the bean out of its skin. This link shows 5 ways to prepare favas: http://www.thekitchn.com/5-fantastic-ways-to-cook-fava-beans-190674
-How to use: Stew skinned beans in a little butter, oil or cream seasoned with savory, thyme or sage. Sauté with other vegetables and toss with pasta. Good in soups. Lots of recipes on the Internet!
-How to store: Store fresh, unshelled beans in the refrigerator up to a week; once shelled, blanched and skinned, favas can be frozen in plastic containers for longer storage; shelled beans are best used within a few days. See “Beans” for recipes in the A to Z Cookbook, if you have it, and also in this newsletter. Delicious!

FRESH GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, bolstering the immune system, lowering blood pressure and preventing heart disease, used as an expectorant or decongestant, and at least some people believe that it can ward off vampires and insects.
-Cooking tips: To mellow garlic’s strong flavors opt for longer cooking; to enjoy its more pungent flavors and increased medicinal benefit, use it raw or with minimal cooking.
-How to use: minced raw in salad dressings, sautéed and added to stir-fries, meats, vegetables; make garlic butter with 1/2 cup of softened butter mashed with four minced cloves of garlic; try roasting garlic by cutting off tops of garlic bulb, so cloves are exposed, brush with olive oil and bake for 1 hour at 350 degrees, squeeze garlic out of skins and spread on a good, crusty bread.
-How to store: fresh garlic can be stored in an open, breathable basket in a cool, dark place for many months.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.
At most locations you may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 4 options. Those with prepacked boxes at limited drop off sites will receive any of the following herbs. Please keep in mind that there are a limited amount of each herb, so it is first-come, first-serve:
-Lemon Balm: these fragrant lemon-minty leaves make a delicate herbal tea, served hot or cold; good addition to lettuce or fruit salads and ice cream; nicely paired with grilled fish or lamb and tossed with steamed vegetables; also aids in depression, tension, or nausea.
-Parsley: You may choose from “Curly” or “Flat Leaf”, dark green leaves with a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces.
-French Sorrel: slightly tart, lemon-flavored green; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces; can be used in omelets, breads, or cooked as a side dish; leaves are shaped like spinach, but paler green in color.
-Tarragon: its flavor is delicate and almost licorice or anise-like; an essential herb in French cuisine; exceptional in egg dishes, poached fish, chicken, mushrooms, salad dressings and with other vegetables.

KALE: You will receive both Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”) and Red Russian (the stems are purple, and leaves are deep gray-green, purple-veined, flat, non-curled, and tooth-edged). See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BABY RED ONIONS: young shoots of red bulb onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants, high in potassium and source of vitamins C and B6. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUGAR SNAP PEAS: flat-round pod of edible-pod pea; often lighter green than the shelling pea pod.
-How to use: add shelled peas to soups, stews, sautes, or stir-fries; blanch or steam for 2-4 minutes only until color is bright green; snap or snow peas can be eaten raw in salads or cooked quickly as in stir-fries or deep fry in tempura batter.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 4-5 days; if kept too long, their sweet flavor and crisp texture diminishes.

SWISS CHARD: close relative of garden beets; multi-colored, large veined, semi-crinkly, dark green leaves; mild flavor; good source of vitamins A, E, & C, as well as iron & calcium.
-How to use: greens can be prepared like spinach, and stalks like asparagus; good steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, and in soups.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 2-4 days.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. 4th of July VACATIONS or OUT OF TOWN: Yes, we will distribute as usual on July 4 at all sites, except Pure Pastures site is closed. All Pure Pastures CSA members will need to sign up for other distribution sites and/or days for Week 6 or you can request a Vacation Hold and we will provide your share to a needy family. Please remember to contact us at least by Saturday to make changes in pick up days or locations, especially with the 4th of July vacations coming up. All changes can be made yourself on our website under the sign up link under Membership Actions on the registration page or you can email us with your request using specific dates and locations.

2. FORAGE AND FEAST Cooking Class on June 27 from 6-8:30 PM: Come to this 2-part session with local forager, Rachel Mifsud, from Will Forage For Food (www.willforageforfood.com). The Foraging Walk from 6:00-7:30pm will focus on looking for edible, medicinal, and otherwise useful plants and mushrooms that are ready for harvest. At 7:30, we will have a Wild Foods Cooking Class. You will learn how to prepare and cook the items we just harvested. You should bring a good kitchen knife and a dish towel for food prep, and your own place setting, so that you can sample the foods that we prepare. This class is limited to 8 participants and Tantre CSA members are offered a discounted price of $25/person. There are still a few spaces, so please register by NOON with your NAME, PHONE, and EMAIL.

3. U-PICK STRAWBERRIES AT THE FARM: If you’re still interested in hunting for berries, you may come to u-pick this week on Wed. or Fri. (10 AM- 7 PM) or Thursday, Saturday afternoon, or Sunday, if you call to schedule your time. Reminder: It’s $4/level qt or $28/flat. Please bring your own containers to transfer them from our quarts, or return our quart baskets to the farm at another time.

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page. Please always email ahead about “limited sites” to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
NEW! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

BASIL: MORE THAN JUST A CULINARY HERB
Basil is one of the most sacred plants of India. It has been used to make royal unguents, perfumes, and medicines. A tea can be made to settle the nerves and aids with indigestion. Medicinally, it is used to stimulate perspiration for the treatment of colds, flu, and fevers.

Fresh basil was also worn throughout the day to help protect, inspire, and elevate the self-esteem of the person who wore it. It protects against contagious diseases and negative influences and is burned as incense and as a disinfectant. The French have used basil to repel mosquitoes and flies, which is why pots of it may be found at sidewalk restaurants in France.

Basil’s most popular use though is as a culinary herb. It is more commonly known for its primary role in tomato sauces, pesto, and salad dressings. It is also popular in Mediterranean dishes and Thai curries. It partners well with almost any summer vegetable, but especially tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, green beans, and summer squash.

Fresh basil deteriorates quickly, especially when refrigerated. It is a warm-weather crop and is sensitive to cold temperatures. If leaves are wrapped in a dry towel and kept in an airtight container, it can be kept at about 50 degrees for a few days before leaves start blackening. That is why we provide it with roots attached, so you may retain its freshness for a week or longer by placing the roots in a jar of water, changing the water every few days, and we don’t refrigerate it. You may also freeze fresh leaves in a plastic zip-lock bag, if you don’t mind the darkened color. This is very easy—just wash leaves, spin dry, place in Ziploc bag, remove air, seal, and freeze. Basil can also be dried by hanging in a dry, warm, well-ventilated place for about 2 weeks. If you would like to retain some of the green color, it needs to be dried quickly in a dehydrator or in the oven at its lowest setting with door ajar. The leaves can be separated before drying and stirred often. Remove dried leaves and store in a sealed glass jar—away from light and heat.

Some people make pesto from the basil leaves and freeze it in ice cube trays or drop on cookie trays like “drop cookies”; then bag it when frozen to be used as needed. Others just mix chopped basil with olive oil or water and freeze in ice cube trays. Remove frozen herb cubes and place in freezer bag. One frozen cube is equivalent to 1 tablespoon fresh or about 1 teaspoon of dried herb, which flavors vegetables, meats, stews, and soups all winter long. Have fun and enjoy a plethora of basil over the coming weeks!

RECIPES

MOROCCAN BISSARA—or FRESH FAVA BEAN DIP (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
1 to 1 1/2 lbs fresh fava beans, shelled, peeled if large
3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 tsp minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/2 tsp ground cumin
4 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 tsp salt
Pita wedges, raw carrots, or crackers for serving

Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring it to a boil. Blanch the beans for 2-3 minutes. Drain, reserving 3 tablespoons of the cooking liquid. Peel if the beans are large. In a blender or food processor, combine half the beans, the reserved liquid and the lemon juice. (Add more liquid if you prefer a thinner dip.) Process, scraping down the sides with a spatula, until the mixture is fairly smooth. Add the remaining beans and the oil, and process until smooth. Transfer to a serving bowl and stir in the salt and cumin. Sprinkle with parsley. Serve with crackers or veggies for dipping.

2018: Week 4, June 17 – 23

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #4
June 17-23, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares. If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA and/or SPICY GREENS: You will receive Arugula (known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor) AND/OR Spicy Greens (gourmet-quality greens for quick cooking; includes Kale, Tatsoi, Hon Tsai Tai, Green and Red Mustard). See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

NAPA CABBAGE: crinkly, thickly veined leaves, which are cream-colored with celadon green tips; unlike the strong-flavored waxy leaves on round cabbage heads, these are thin, crisp, and delicately mild; good source of vitamin A, folic acid, and potassium. See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.
**At some locations you may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 5 options. Those with prepacked boxes at limited drop off sites will receive 2 of any of the following herbs. Please keep in mind that there are a limited amount of each herb, so it is first-come, first-serve:
–Bronze-leaf Fennel – anise-flavored, feathered foliage; can be used for garnish or flavor enhancer for salads, soups, and egg dishes; rich in vitamin A and contains calcium, phosphorous, and potassium
–Black-Stemmed Peppermint: superior fragrance and flavor; forest green leaves with deep purple veins and stems, purple flowers; leaves are good as a hot or iced tea, and adds a delicious flavor when minced and added to cooked peas, carrots, potatoes, salads, and fresh strawberries.
–Oregano: member of the mint family and is similar to marjoram, but not as sweet and more pungent flavor and aroma; good in soups and tomato-based dishes.
–French Sorrel: slightly tart, lemon-flavored green; excellent for salads, soups, and sauces; can be used in omelets, breads, or cooked as a side dish; leaves are shaped like spinach, but paler green in color; high in vitamin A and contains some calcium, phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin C; refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 3 days.
–Winter Savory: is a semi-evergreen, perennial herb; its strong spicy flavor goes well with beans and meat; medicinally it has antiseptic, aromatic, carminative, and digestive benefits, as well as relieves bee stings; fresh savory has a strong spicy-peppery flavor and resinous odor similar to fresh thyme

KALE (Green Curly): well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”.
-How to use: for salads, soups, and light cooking.
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator for up to 1 week.

BABY KOHLRABI: delicious bulbous member of the cabbage family, that grows above ground; green skin and crisp, apple-white flesh tubers and leaves are good sources of vitamins C and A, calcium, potassium, and fiber. Some of these are very small so range in size from a golf ball to a tennis ball. Most people enjoy taking the skin off and eating them raw, like an apple.
-How to use: good steamed and then mashed with potatoes, added to soups or stews, or delicious sliced and eaten raw with dip.
-How to store: store in refrigerator for up to a month.

LETTUCE: You will receive Green or Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GREEN ONIONS (Baby Red Onions): young shoots of red bulb onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants, high in potassium and source of vitamins C and B-6. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

PARSNIPS: long, cylindrical, creamy-white roots with sweet flavor; contain small amounts of iron and vitamin C. These parsnips were harvested midwinter during a thaw, so they are frost-sweetened, but have been stored for several months. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

RADISHES: This will be for Fri/Sat. Members only. You will receive Easter Egg Radish (a beautiful mix of red, purple, pink, and white round radishes; crisp and mild flavor) or D’Avignon (also called, “French Breakfast”; traditional variety from Southern France; 3- to 4-inch long root that is part red with a white tip and tapered to a point). See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

STRAWBERRIES: red, conical fruit with tiny white flowers. This week each share will receive 2 quarts of this member of the rose family. See Week 3 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. 4th of July VACATIONS or OUT OF TOWN: Yes, we will distribute as usual on July 4 at all sites, except Pure Pastures site is closed. All Pure Pastures CSA members will need to sign up for other distribution sites and/or days for Week 6 or you can request a Vacation Hold and we will provide your share to a needy family. Please remember to contact us at least by Saturday to make changes in pick up days or locations, especially with the 4th of July vacations coming up. Also keep in mind that Pick Up Rescheduling needs to be made within the same week (Sun.-Sat.). All changes can be made yourself on our website under the sign up link under Membership Actions on the registration page or you can email us with your request using specific dates and locations.

2. STILL ROOM for 3 More–RUSSIAN SUMMER HOUSE FEAST – COOKING CLASS on June 21 from 6-8:30 PM: UM professors and CSA members, Alina and Michael Makin, will facilitate ways to use your early summer produce as a typical meal at the “Russian Summer-House”, which Alina remembers from her early years. Based on the culinary heritage of her native Russia, but making ample use of other culinary traditions, Alina’s meal will showcase the Tantré share with savory and sweet dishes that we will turn into a delectable meal by the end of the night. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. A small fee of $5 will help pay for any materials and extra ingredients. More details will come later in a separate email on Wednesday.

3. FAMILY FARM HIKE on June 22: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm on Friday, June 22, at 4 PM. We’ll use all our senses as we take an approx. 45 minute hike with CSA member, Sheila Schueller and her daughter, Renia. You will explore the farm’s fields, wetlands, and forest. Sheila has taught ecology and field biology classes at Eastern Michigan University and the University of Michigan. Meet by the picnic tables in the backyard at 4 PM. No RSVP necessary, but if you email that you plan to attend, then we know to wait for you.

4. FORAGE AND FEAST Cooking Class on June 27 from 6-8:30 PM: Local foraging expert, Rachel Mifsud, from Will Forage For Food (www.willforageforfood.com) will facilitate a class based on foraging wild edibles around the farm, possibly supplemented with some Tantre ingredients to produce a delectable meal that perhaps you could scavenge from your own backyard. You will learn how to make 4 or 5 dishes that will culminate in a meal together by the end of the class. This class is limited to 8 participants and Tantre CSA members are offered a discounted price of $25/person. Please register by email with your NAME, PHONE, and EMAIL.

5. STRAWBERRIES AT THE FARM : It has been a great strawberry season! We picked almost 800 quarts of strawberries for your CSA shares and for sale in the last 2 days. This week you may come to the farm for “already picked” strawberries or to “pick-your-own” this week on Wednesday (10 AM- 7 PM) and Friday (10 AM – 7 PM) by just showing up. We will be around all day on Wed. and Fri., since they are normal distribution days at the farm, so no need to let us know you are coming. Also we will be open for u-pick on Thursday and Sunday too, but it would be helpful to email, text, or call Deb 734-385-6748, so we know when you are hoping to come, so we will be around the house or backyard. Please bring your own containers to transfer strawberries into or return quarts and flats back to the farm.
U-PICK: $4/level qt and $28/flat (8 quarts).
ALREADY PICKED (at Market, Farm, and the Food Hub): $5/qt and $35/flat (8 quarts)

6. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: We have plenty of weeds to pull. If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm, come join us. Please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark. Thanks for volunteering!

7. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page. These sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited”. Please always email ahead to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
NEW! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
by Deb and Richard
All of the rain this spring contributed to a great abundance of vegetables, especially the asparagus, lettuce greens, kale, turnips, green onions, etc.). The steady rain has continued to help the summer fruiting crops (tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers) to swell and grow in leaps and bounds. The garlic scapes were all picked off the garlic plants by the second week of June, and now we are looking to start our garlic harvest by the end of next week. The strawberries enjoyed a heavy blanket of straw mulch all winter long keeping them warm and cozy. When we uncovered them this spring we had millions of green leaves and stems followed by the dainty white blooms dotting the green. The weather lately has been pretty ideal for the berries. Just enough sun to sweeten and fatten them robustly and just enough rain to help them to swell. We are looking forward to at least another week of berries in your CSA share! We are starting to see some of the late spring/early summer crops (peas, fava beans) getting ready for harvest. We hope to be showing you cucumbers, summer squash, broccoli, beans, cabbage and new potatoes in your boxes in the next few weeks. So far our Summer Season is off to a good start! We have a warm and congenial crew, who work well together. We also really appreciate all the support from our CSA members, and look forward to an abundant year!

RECIPES

GARLIC SCAPE-KALE PESTO Makes about 1 1/2 cups of pesto
1 cup Garlic scapes (about 8-9 scapes) cut into 1/4-inch slices
3-5 leaves Kale
1/3 cup Walnuts, Pecans, or Pine Nuts (toasting these adds a nice twist)
3/4 cup Olive oil
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 tsp salt
Black pepper, to taste
Place scapes, kale, and nuts in the bowl of a food processor and grind until well combined and somewhat smooth but not purely pureed. Slowly drizzle in oil and process until integrated but there is still some “chunkiness”. Transfer mix to a mixing bowl. Add Parmesan, salt and pepper to taste.

2018: Week 3, June 10 – 16

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #3
June 10-16, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GREENS ADVICE for the entire season: Please keep in mind that greens are especially prominent during this early part of the farm season, so basically, “It’s salad time!” If you’re not sure how best to enjoy your green, taste it. Greens can be eaten raw in a salad or lightly steamed or sautéed with garlic, green onions, or butter in order to mellow their flavor. They can also be tossed into a dish (such as soup or a smoothie) for an extra nutritional and flavorful boost.

ARUGULA or SPICY GREENS: This will be for Fri/Sat. Members only, since not quite ready for Wed. members. Arugula (known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor) OR Spicy Greens (gourmet-quality greens for quick cooking; includes Kale, Tatsoi, Hon Tsai Tai, Green and Red Mustard).
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

ASPARAGUS: You will receive a bunch of green, purple, or white variety; each contains vitamins A, B, and C, as well as iron.
-How to use: serve raw, chopped in salads, or with dips. You can also steam, roast, grill.
-How to store: wrap in damp cloth and plastic bag, then refrigerate.

NAPA CABBAGE: crinkly, thickly veined leaves, which are cream-colored with celadon green tips; unlike the strong-flavored waxy leaves on round cabbage heads, these are thin, crisp, and delicately mild; good source of vitamin A, folic acid, and potassium.
-How to use: use raw, saute, bake, or braised; common in stir-fries and main ingredient in traditional kimchi; also eaten raw as a wrap for pork or oysters; the outer, tougher leaves are used in soups.
-How to store: refrigerate, tightly wrapped, up to 5 days.

ROOT CELLAR CARROTS (Chantenay): This will be for Wed. members only. These carrots are shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods. These carrots have been stored for the winter, so some may have spots to cut off, but are still good to use, but every once in awhile, a rubbery or mushy carrot will have escaped our crew’s watchful eye. Please feel free to make soup stock or compost out of the carrots that are considered “ugly” or “unfit”.
-How to use: best used for cooking in stews, soups, casseroles, or stir fries, since may have a stronger carrot flavor from being stored for several months in cold storage.
-How to store: refrigerate roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes.
-How to use: mild garlic flavor, so delicious chopped in salads, roasted, and sauteed.
-How to store: put in refrigerator in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.
**At some locations you may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 5 options. Those with prepacked boxes at limited drop off sites will receive 2 of any of the following herbs. Please keep in mind that there are a limited amount of each herb, so it is first-come, first-serve:
–Chamomile— These small, daisy-like flowers are best known for making a soothing, sleepy time tea; also the flowers make a flavorful addition to salads and garnish. The whole bundle can be used fresh or dried upside down, and then the flowers plucked and put into a jar for a restful, calming tea for the winter.
–Chives: mild, onion-flavored herb with long, slender, hollow leaves; often used as a garnish or chopped into any foods that call for onion; good in soups, egg dishes, and meat.
–Lemon Balm: these fragrant lemon-minty leaves make a delicate herbal tea, served hot or cold; good addition to lettuce or fruit salads and ice cream; nicely paired with grilled fish or lamb and tossed with steamed vegetables; also aids in depression and nausea.
–Sage–an herb from an evergreen shrub in the mint family with long, narrow, grayish-green leaves; a musky aroma and a warm and spicy taste; used in making sausages, stews, breads, pickles and teas. The flowers are edible and make nice garnishes and can be infused into a delicious vinaigrette!
–Thyme– tiny green leaves used in meat and vegetable dishes and most casseroles, soups, stews, and medicinal teas, which

LETTUCE: You will receive 2 heads of Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce.
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups or smoothies
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

BABY LETTUCE MIX (Wildfire): a beautiful bag of dark reds and vibrant greens including Green and Red Oakleaf, Green and Red Romaine, and Redleaf lettuces. Your lettuce has been rinsed once, but probably needs more washing.
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

GREEN ONIONS (also called “Scallions”): young shoots of bulb onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants.
-How to use: the bulb, flowers, and green leaves are edible; can be cooked, grilled, roasted whole as a vegetable; chopped in salads, soups, & other dishes for flavor.
-How to store: refrigerate in damp towel/plastic bag for 5-7 days.

PARSNIPS: long, cylindrical, creamy-white roots with sweet flavor; contain small amounts of iron and vitamin C. These parsnips were harvested midwinter during a thaw, so they are frost-sweetened, but have been stored for several months.
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, sauteed, steamed; our favorite way to prepare them is to roast with olive oil and fresh herbs.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

RADISHES: You will receive Easter Egg Radish (a beautiful mix of red, purple, pink, and white round radishes; crisp and mild flavor) or D’Avignon (also called, “French Breakfast”; traditional variety from Southern France; 3- to 4-inch long root that is part red with a white tip and tapered to a point).
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; Radish greens (excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s) delicious in soups or stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

STRAWBERRIES: red, conical fruit with tiny white flowers. This week each share will receive 2 quarts of this member of the rose family.
-How to use: excellent raw, juicing, jam, pie, sorbet, in desserts
-How to store: Do not wash until you are ready to consume them. Place them on a paper towel in a tightly-covered container in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days.
-How to freeze: This is so easy to do for fresh berries! Freeze whole strawberries hulled and washed on cookie sheets and when frozen put in freezer bags.

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: You will receive a large bunch of white salad turnips with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture. Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium) and greens are edible!
-How to use: roots and greens good in salads and soups; can be roasted, steamed, or sauteed.
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last up to 1-2 weeks in refrigerator.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. RUSSIAN SUMMER HOUSE FEAST – COOKING CLASS on June 21 from 6-8:30 PM: UM professors and CSA members, Alina and Michael Makin, will facilitate ways to use your early summer produce as a typical meal at the “Russian Summer-House”, which Alina remembers from her early years. Based on the culinary heritage of her native Russia, but making ample use of other culinary traditions, Alina’s meal will showcase the Tantré share with savory and sweet dishes that we will turn into a delectable meal by the end of the night. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. A small fee of $5 will help pay for any materials and extra ingredients. More details will come later in a separate email.

2. FAMILY FARM HIKE on June 22: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm on Friday, June 22, at 4 PM. We’ll use all our senses as we take an approx. 45 minute hike with CSA member, Sheila Schueller and her daughter, Renia. You will explore the farm’s fields, wetlands, and forest. Sheila has taught ecology and field biology classes at Eastern Michigan University and the University of Michigan. Meet by the picnic tables in the backyard at 4 PM. No RSVP necessary, but if you email that you plan to attend, then we know to wait for you. GREENS ADVICE for the entire season: Please keep in mind that greens are especially prominent durivng this early part of the farm season, so basically, “It’s salad time!” If you’re not sure how best to enjoy your green, taste it. Greens can be eaten raw in a salad or lightly steamed or sautéed with garlic, green onions, or butter in order to mellow their flavor. They can also be tossed into a dish (such as soup or a smoothie) for an extra nutritional and flavorful boost.

3. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: We have plenty of weeds to pull. If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm, come join us. Please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark. Thanks for volunteering!

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page. These sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited”. Please always email ahead to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
–Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
–MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
–Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
–Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
–Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
–Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
–Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
–Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
–Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
–NEW! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

RECIPES

SAGE FLOWERS (https://www.splendidtable.org/story/sage-flowers-can-add-another-dimension-to-a-dish)
Herb flowers are delicate; you don’t want to do a lot to them because they are fragile in aroma and taste. You can flavor chicken or a robust-tasting fish with the sage leaves. Then sprinkle the sage flowers on the cooked food, encouraging people to eat the flowers with the sage-flavored dish — the flowers will add another dimension. You can also make Sage Butter by mixing it in the processor with some lemon juice and freeze it in logs for later use.
You might also fry them! Make a batter of flour, water, salt and pepper, and dip the flowers in the batter. Have about 1/2 inch of oil in a shallow pan, get the oil hot and drop in the batter-coated flowers. They’ll brown quickly. https://www.fivesensespalate.com/fried-sage-flowers/

NAPA CABBAGE SALAD (from www.allrecipes.com) Serves 6
1 head Napa cabbage
1 bunch minced green onions
1/3 cup butter
1 (3 oz) package ramen noodles, broken
2 Tbsp sesame seeds
1 cup slivered almonds
1/4 cup cider vinegar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup white sugar
2 Tbsp soy sauce
Finely shred the head of cabbage; do not chop. Combine the green onions and cabbage in a large bowl, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Make the crunchies: melt the butter in a pot. Mix the ramen noodles, sesame seeds and almonds into the pot with the melted butter. Spoon the mixture onto a baking sheet and bake the crunchies in the preheated 350 degrees oven, turning often to make sure they do not burn. When they are browned remove them from the oven. Make the dressing: in a small saucepan, heat vinegar, oil, sugar, and soy sauce. Bring the mixture to a boil, let boil for 1 minute. Remove the pan from heat and let cool. Combine dressing, crunchies, and cabbage immediately before serving. Serve right away or the crunchies will get soggy.

FRESH STRAWBERRY DRESSING (from www.eatingwell.com)
1 cup strawberries, rinsed, hulled and sliced
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
3/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp salt
2 Tbsp almond oil or canola oil
Place strawberries, vinegar, pepper, sugar and salt in a blender or food processor; process until pureed, stopping once or twice to scrape down the sides. Add oil and process until smooth.

2018: Week 2, June 3 – 9

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #2
June 3-9, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA (Sylvetta): also known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

ASPARAGUS: You will receive a bunch of green, purple, or white variety; each contains vitamins A, B, and C, as well as iron.
– How to use: serve raw, chopped in salads, or with dips. You can also steam, roast, grill.
– How to store: wrap in damp cloth and plastic bag, then refrigerate. Alternatively, bundle spears with rubber band and place upright in container with an inch of water.

ROOT CELLAR CARROTS (Chantenay): shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods. These carrots have been stored for the winter, so some may have spots to cut off, but are still good to use, but every once in awhile, a rubbery or mushy carrot will have escaped our crew’s watchful eye. Please feel free to make soup stock or compost out of the carrots that are considered “ugly” or “unfit”.
-How to use: best used for cooking in stews, soups, casseroles, or stir fries, since may have a stronger carrot flavor from being stored for several months in cold storage.
-How to store: refrigerate roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

GARLIC SCAPES: slender green stems with a slight bulge at the bottom (resemble chives, except for the bulge and often curled); the flower top of a garlic plant; tender and milder in flavor than mature garlic, but can be substituted for garlic cloves in recipes.
-How to use: mild garlic flavor, so delicious chopped in salads, roasted, and sauteed.
-How to store: put in refrigerator in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.
**You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 5 options. Please keep in mind that there are a limited amount of each herb, so it is first-come, first-serve:
–Bronze-leaf Fennel – anise-flavored, feathered foliage; can be used for garnish or flavor enhancer for salads, soups, and egg dishes; rich in vitamin A and contains calcium, phosphorous, and potassium
–Lemon Balm – these fragrant lemon-minty leaves make a delicate herbal tea, served hot or cold; good addition to lettuce or fruit salads and ice cream; nicely paired with grilled fish or lamb and tossed with steamed vegetables; also aids in depression, tension, or nausea.
–Winter Savory – is a semi-evergreen, perennial herb; its strong spicy flavor goes well with beans and meat; medicinally it has antiseptic, aromatic, carminative, and digestive benefits, as well as relieves bee stings; fresh savory has a strong spicy-peppery flavor and resinous odor similar to fresh thyme; prior to widespread European use of long pepper and black pepper, savory filled a similar role in European cuisine.
–Tarragon – its flavor is delicate and almost licorice or anise-like; an essential herb in French cuisine; exceptional in egg dishes, poached fish, chicken, mushrooms, salad dressings and with other vegetables.
–Oregano – This member of the mint family is similar to marjoram, but not as sweet and more pungent, spicy flavor and aroma; good in soups and tomato-based dishes; good as a tea for indigestion and excellent chewed up and applied for relief with bee stings.

LETTUCE: You will receive 2 heads of Red Leaf lettuce and/or Romaine lettuce.
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

RED SCALLIONS: young shoots of red onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants, high in potassium and source of vitamins C and B-6.
-How to use: the bulb, flowers, and green leaves are edible; can be cooked, grilled, roasted whole as a vegetable; chopped in salads, soups, and other dishes for flavor.
-How to store: refrigerate in damp towel/plastic bag for 2-5 days.

PARSNIPS: long, cylindrical, creamy-white roots with sweet flavor; contain small amounts of iron and vitamin C. These parsnips were harvested midwinter during a thaw, so they are frost-sweetened, but have been stored for several months.
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, sauteed, steamed; our favorite way to prepare them is to roast with olive oil and fresh herbs.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

ROOT CELLAR POTATOES (Mountain Rose): rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried. You will receive these “old buddies” potatoes that have been over-wintered in our timber frame root cellar; possibly slightly less firm than a new potato, but good for cooking in any way suggested below.
-How to use: good baked, boiled, roasted or in potato salads
-How to store: keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag; ideal temperature is 38-40 degrees with 80-90 percent humidity; a basement or the refrigerator will work with storage potatoes.

RADISHES: You will receive Easter Egg Radish (a beautiful mix of red, purple, pink, and white round radishes; crisp and mild flavor).
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, sandwiches, or stir-fries, grated in slaws; Radish greens (excellent source of vitamins A, C, and the B’s) delicious in soups or stir-fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

SPICY GREENS (Stir-Fry Mix): gourmet-quality greens for quick cooking; includes Kale, Tatsoi, Hon Tsai Tai, Green and Red Mustard.
-How to use: used for salads, quick sauteing/braising, and stir fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 2-4 days.

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: You will receive a large bunch of white salad turnips with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture. Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium) and greens (slightly sweet and excellent source of vitamins A and C and good source of riboflavin, calcium and iron) are edible!
-How to use: roots and greens good in salads and soups; can be roasted, steamed, or sauteed.
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last up to 1-2 weeks in refrigerator.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. RUSSIAN SUMMER HOUSE FEAST – COOKING CLASS on June 21 from 6-8:30 PM: UM professors and CSA members, Alina and Michael Makin, will facilitate ways to use your early summer produce as a typical meal at the “Russian Summer-House”, which Alina remembers from her early years. Based on the culinary heritage of her native Russia, but making ample use of other culinary traditions, Alina’s meal will showcase the Tantré share with savory and sweet dishes that we will turn into a delectable meal by the end of the night. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. A small fee of $5 will help pay for any materials and extra ingredients.

2. FAMILY FARM HIKE on June 22: Come join us for a guided monthly exploratory walk around Tantre Farm on Friday, June 22, at 4 PM. We’ll use all our senses as we take an approx. 45 minute hike with CSA member, Sheila Schueller and her daughter, Renia. You will explore the farm’s fields, wetlands, and forest. Sheila has taught ecology and field biology classes at Eastern Michigan University and the University of Michigan. Meet by the picnic tables in the backyard at 4 PM. No RSVP necessary, but if you email that you plan to attend, then we know to wait for you.

3. CHANGING PICK UP DAYS: Please remember to contact us preferably a week in advance, but at least by Saturday of each week, to make changes in pick up days or locations. It is very disappointing to put together a box that is never picked up. Please have the courtesy to make some kind of contact with us, if you can not pick up your box for some reason.

4. PAYMENTS DUE: If you still owe money, you will see it in the Balance Due column on the Pick up Sheet. Please let us know if you think there is a mistake. Please finalize payments as soon as possible during the month of June.

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page. These sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited”. Please always email ahead to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

RECIPES

ASPARAGUS GUACAMOLE
5-6 asparagus spears
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
1/2 lime, juiced
2 green onions, sliced thin
1 clove garlic, minced or 1 Tbsp garlic scapes
1 tomato, seeded and diced
1 tsp Kosher salt
Break off woody ends of asparagus, blanch quickly and puree. Then add the rest of the ingredients to the pureed asparagus and puree the whole thing. Can be served on crackers, bread, or with vegetables.

LEMON BALM VINAIGRETTE Makes about 2/3 cup
1 Tbsp shallots, minced
2 Tbsp lemon balm, minced
1/2 tsp lemon zest
6 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
4 Tbsp white wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp brown sugar
8 Tbsp vegetable oil
Mix first 7 ingredients together, and then slowly blend in the oil. Mix well before serving. This is delicious on salads, especially fish or chicken salads. You can also marinate chicken or fish piece in this mixture before cooking. After cooking, serve the vinaigrette as a sauce.

INDIAN STYLE TURNIPS OR RADISH (contributed by CSA member, Anu Whitelocke)
Serve as side dish or main meal for one person.
1 bunch turnips & greens and/or 1 bunch radishes & greens (chopped)
1 tsp turmeric
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
1-2 Tbsp oil
Chili powder, to taste
Salt, to taste
1 tsp coriander powder
2-3 garlic scapes chopped
In saute pan, heat oil on high heat. Add turmeric, mustard seeds, chili powder, coriander powder, salt. Stir over med-high heat for 2-3 min. Add turnips (root) and coat well with oil/spice mixture. Cook over med-high heat for a couple of minutes. Add garlic scapes and greens. Continue to cook on med-high heat for a couple of minutes. Turn heat down to low and cover for 5 minutes. Cook until desired consistency for turnips is achieved (some like crunch, some like soft).

FRENCH HERB ROAST CHICKEN (from www.sunset.com/food-wine/kitchen-assistant/tarragon-recipe-ideas#tarragon-recipe-ideas_3)
For the French Herb rub, combine 2 tbsp. each coarsely chopped fresh tarragon leaves and chives; set half aside. In step 2, distribute half the chopped herbs in chicken pockets. When chicken comes out of the oven, brush with a small amount of pan juices, then scatter remaining herbs over it.

2018: Week 1, May 27 – June 2

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #1
May 27-June 2, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA (Sylvetta): also known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor
-How to use: add to salads, soups, and sautéed vegetable dishes
-How to store: very perishable, so use up quickly; store in plastic bag with a paper towel in refrigerator for up to 5 days.

ASPARAGUS: You will receive a bunch of green, purple, or white variety; each contains vitamins A, B, and C, as well as iron.
– How to use: serve raw, chopped in salads, or with dips. You can also steam, roast, grill.
– How to store: wrap in damp cloth and plastic bag, then refrigerate. Alternatively, bundle spears with rubber band and
place upright in container with an inch of water.

STORAGE CARROTS (Chantenay): shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods. These carrots have been stored for the winter, so some may have spots to cut off, but are still good to use, but every once in awhile, a rubbery or mushy carrot will have escaped our crew’s watchful eye. Please feel free to make soup stock or compost out of the carrots that are considered “ugly” or “unfit”. See feature article on “Food for Thought”.
-How to use: best used for cooking in stews, soups, casseroles, or stir fries, since may have a stronger carrot flavor from being stored for several months in cold storage.
-How to store: refrigerate roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

FRESH HERBS: With all this rain and heat all at once,the herbs are growing and flowering or getting ready to flower, so we have several herbs to choose from this week. In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.
**You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 5 options:
–Chamomile— These small, daisy-like flowers are best known for making a soothing tea; also the flowers make a pretty garnish and a flavorful addition to salads. The whole bundle can be used fresh or dried upside down for a week or two, and then the flowers plucked and put into a jar for a restful, calming, sleepy time tea for the winter.
–Lovage: celery-flavored herb, good in vegetarian soups and stews, especially potato or tomato dishes; use sparingly, since it does have a strong flavor; hollow stems can be candied and used as straws in Bloody Marys.
–Chives—mild, onion-flavored herb with long, slender, hollow leaves; can be added to potato salad, baked potatoes, soups, salads, omelets, dips and spreads, pastas and sauces.; purple, onion-flavored blossoms add an attractive garnish to soups or salads (stems attached to blossoms are often discarded due to toughness).
–Thyme– tiny green leaves used in meat and vegetable dishes and most casseroles, soups, stews, and medicinal teas, which soothe sore throats. Some of the thyme has gone to flower, so the leaves are small, but the flowers are dainty and delicious and can be chopped up along with the leaves.
–Oregano—This member of the mint family is similar to marjoram, but not as sweet and more pungent, spicy flavor and aroma; good in soups and tomato-based dishes.

LETTUCE: You will receive 2-4 heads of Red and Green Leaf lettuce.
-How to use: raw in salads, sandwiches, or use in soups
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 3-5 days.

GREEN ONIONS (also called “Scallions”): young shoots of bulb onions with long green stalks and milder tasting than large bulb onions; full of great fiber and antioxidants, high in potassium and source of vitamins C and B-6.
-How to use: the bulb, flowers, and green leaves are edible; can be cooked, grilled, roasted whole as a vegetable; chopped in salads, soups, & other dishes for flavor. Green leaves are excellent in stock.
-How to store: refrigerate in damp towel/plastic bag for 5-7 days.

PARSNIPS: long, cylindrical, creamy-white roots with sweet flavor; contain small amounts of iron and vitamin C. These parsnips were harvested midwinter during a thaw, so they are frost-sweetened, but have been stored for several months. See feature article on “Food for Thought”.
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, sauteed, steamed; our favorite way to prepare them is to roast with olive oil and fresh herbs.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

POTATOES (Mountain Rose): rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured; extra nutritious, and high in antioxidants; excellent baked, mashed or fried. You will receive these “old buddies” potatoes that have been over-wintered in our timber frame root cellar; possibly slightly less firm than a new potato, but good for cooking in any way suggested below. See feature article on “Food for Thought”.
-How to use: good baked, boiled, roasted or in potato salads
-How to store: keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag; ideal temperature is 38-40 degrees with 80-90 percent humidity; a basement or very cool closet will work.

SPICY GREENS (Stir-Fry Mix): gourmet-quality greens for quick cooking; includes Kale, Tatsoi, Hon Tsai Tai, Green and Red Mustard.
-How to use: used for salads, quick sauteing/braising, and stir fries.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for 2-4 days.

SPINACH: You will receive a bag of this crisp, dark green leaf; high in beneficial chlorophyll, as well as vitamins A & C
– How to use: juiced, toss in fresh salad, add to sandwiches, sauté, steam, braise, or add to crepes, quiche, lasagna, and soups.
– How to store: refrigerate with a damp towel/bag for up to 1 week.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
1. ANY CHANGES in your address, phone, e-mail, or of misspelled names on any mailings or Pick Up Lists at Distribution Sites? Please let us know as soon as possible.

2. MISSED PICK UP: If you don’t pick up or forget to come, your share will be brought back to the Farm, and you will have one day to get your share before it will be taken apart or donated after any distribution. Always please call or email immediately, so we know what happened and what to do with your share.

3. CSA COOKBOOKS: We will have a handy cookbook for sale this season called “From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce”. This $16 book includes an easy-to-follow format with vegetables listed from A to Z. We will have a limited number of these cookbooks available, so if you are interested in purchasing these books, and they are no longer at your site, please let us know, so we can make another bulk order. Some of our sites are tricky to leave cookbooks, since we will not be able to pick up your payments and leftover cookbooks each week, since it is just a drop off site. Please contact Deb to arrange getting a cookbook at Pure Pastures, Argus, or MOVE, and we will try to work something out.

4. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: With all the rain and heat we have plenty of weeds to pull. If you are interested in helping out–even if it’s just for 10 or 15 minutes before you pick up your box at the farm, we sure could use the extra hands. Please contact us any day of the week or evenings.

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
**If you need to switch to different pick up sites throughout the season that usually works for all but the “limited sites”, using the Membership Actions section on the registration page. These sites have less space to drop share boxes at, so are considered “limited”. Please always email ahead to see if they are at capacity before making any switches on your own.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Ann Arbor Farmers Market (There is NO Community High School distribution site this year due to Construction on 5th St.) (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
New! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT
Over the winter we sometimes have a few extra moments to read and wonder as we sit by the wood stove, and sometimes our minds consider issues that go beyond our impact locally. As we begin our new summer season this week we wanted to give you a few facts to ponder, and consider a thoughtful look at our perceptions of food on a personal scale, but also on a global scale. We all may consider how we are part of the problem of food waste as farmers and consumers, but also more importantly how we can be part of the solution.

Here are some statistics to consider:
*About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

*Fruits and vegetables, plus roots and tubers have the highest wastage rates of any food.

*At a retail level, large quantities of food are wasted due to quality standards that over-emphasize appearance.

*Even if just one-fourth of the food currently lost or wasted globally could be saved, it would be enough to feed 870 million hungry people in the world.

*In medium- and high-income countries food is wasted and lost mainly at later stages in the supply chain. Differing from the situation in developing countries, the behaviour of consumers plays a huge part in industrialized countries. The study identified a lack of coordination between actors in the supply chain as a contributing factor. Farmer-buyer agreements can be helpful to increase the level of coordination. Additionally, raising awareness among industries, retailers and consumers as well as finding beneficial use for food that is presently thrown away are useful measures to decrease the amount of losses and waste. (sourced from http://www.fao.org/save-food/resources/keyfindings/en/).

Other related articles below:
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/03/global-food-waste-statistics/

https://www.npr.org/tags/395584998/ugly-produce

https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2018/01/11/a-new-market-for-old-and-ugly-fruit-and-vegetables-takes-shape

RECIPES

SPINACH AND ASPARAGUS FRITTATA (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website) Serves 4
Filling:
1 bunch spinach, washed and drained, with stems removed
1 lb asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 cloves garlic or green onions, minced or mashed
Egg mixture:
8 eggs, beaten
3 Tbsp whipping cream or water
1/4 tsp salt
Pepper, to taste
2 Tbsp Parmesan cheese, shredded
Olive oil, to coat skillet
Preheat broiler. Mix ingredients well and pour into a greased 8-inch skillet and stir until set (about 5 minutes). Place under broiler for 2 minutes until top is golden brown. Cut into slices.

BRAISED MUSTARD GREENS (from Mad Mares Cookbook) Serves 6
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion or 4-6 green onions, chopped
2 shallots, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbsp stock, chicken or vegetable
2 lbs mustard greens, arugula, or spicy greens
2 tsp lime juice
1/2 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp pepper
Heat oil over moderate heat in large pot. Saute onion, shallots, and garlic until golden, about 8 minutes. Add stock. Place greens, torn into pieces, on top. Cover and cook until tender, turning greens about 20 minutes. Toss in lime juice, salt, and pepper.

LOVAGE VINEGAR (by Brenda Hyde)
1 qt cider vinegar
2 large sprigs lovage
Place into a bottle or jar with a lid. Keep in a cool, dark place for 3-4 weeks. Use in dressings, or stews.

2017 Solstice Share

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
SOLSTICE SHARE
December 16, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.comphone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

HAPPY SOLSTICE, EVERYONE!
Thank you for joining our Solstice CSA to celebrate the return of the light with good cheer and good health for the New Year.  We are proud to share this collaboration of the Brinery, Garden Works, Mill Pond Bread, Harvest Kitchen, and Tantre Farm for this unique Solstice celebration.  Through this cooperative spirit we embrace the euphoria of this moment to provide you with winter sustenance of these nutritionally dense roots and storage vegetables.  We hope this food will contribute to a happy, healthy feast for you and your family.

The all-day twilight of our mid-December days have been filled with sorting squash in our moist, cool, root cellar basement.  This time has afforded us with many hours of convivial handwork to share with one another on the farm.  From the wee hours in the early morning until the dusky hours of late afternoon we share in work and friendship with a midday break of a good, hearty, plant-based meal for lunch.  As this year comes to an end, we will wish farewell to all who have been a good supportive community in body and mind for our harvest together.  A special thanks goes out to one of our seasoned farm/CSA managers, Rene Cuellar, for his sunny smile and great and noble mind as he travels to distant adventures after three years of being part of our “farmily”.  We wish him well!

We will be distributing the vegetables for this generous share in a 2 bushel box with the following items on the side: The Brinery’s jar of sauerkraut, Mill Pond Bread’s Sourdough French Bread, Garden Works’s sunflower and pea shoots, and Harvest Kitchen’s pot pie and slaw.  This means that it might be helpful to bring some extra bags, boxes, or baskets, if you don’t want to bring the box home. You can keep the box or return it at a later date to any of the distribution sites or to our market stall. We will have some extra bags available.  You will need to check off your name on the Pick Up List at the Washtenaw Food Hub from 9 AM until Noon, Tantre Farm from 2 to 5 PM, and Pure Pastures from 9 AM until 7 PM. Please ask for help if you need any help loading, and most importantly please make sure that your final payment goes into the Payment Envelope at each distribution site on Saturday, if you haven’t paid for your share yet. All CSA members at Pure Pastures need to mail their payments to the farm. Please have the courtesy to email or text/call Deb’s cell phone at 734-385-6748, if you can’t make it to your scheduled Distribution Site, so we know what your situation is, so we don’t have to track you down. More storage tips can be found on our website under CSA Info>Veggie Id or Recipes>Produce Information Organized by Parts of the Plant.

Also, throughout the late fall and winter, please free to contact us, if you are interested in more squash, potatoes, radishes, cabbage, turnips, onions, parsnips, etc., which you can pick up at the farm or the Ann Arbor Farmers Market.  After the Solstice Distribution on Dec. 16, we will continue to set up at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market every Saturday starting again in January, but market starts at 8 AM and ends at 2 PM for these “winter hours”.   If you have “liked” us on Tantre Farm’s Facebook page, you will know when we are coming and what we are bringing, since we try to keep you updated there when we can.  The People’s Food Coop and the 2 Argus Farm Stops of Ann Arbor also continue to carry many of our vegetables throughout the winter and early spring.

If you are interested in our Summer CSA shares for 2018, our online registration is now open.  We have offered a $10 Discount for December registrations, but you will need to type EARLYBIRD in the Coupon Code box.  This is NOT an automatic discount.  Just check our website and your emails for details.   Consider giving a Tantre Summer CSA share as a special gift for someone during this holiday time!  Now we also have gift certificates available at the AA Farmers market for those who want to make a smaller gift amount for purchases at the markets.

Thanks for buying locally and seasonally.  We wish you a sustainably rich and enlightened transition into light as we enter the end of 2017 and begin anew with 2018!

–Deb and Richard

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE

APPLE & KOHLRABI SLAW:  Harvest Kitchen (www.harvest-kitchen.com) has assembled a specially-made salad of apple wood-smoked apples with kohlrabi. This is a salad laden with nutrition and a rainbow of enticing, crunchy flavors.  Harvest Kitchen is a Food Hub tenant and sells their product at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, and both Argus Farm Stops.
-How to use: serve chilled, spread it on a sandwich, or toss it as a garnish on your soup; perfect complement to the pot pie!
-How to store: can be used fresh, but as it marinates the subtle flavors blend richly together, and can be refrigerated up to 7 days.

BEETS:  These beet varieties will be in a mixed net bag of Red Ace baby beets (round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor when eaten raw or cooked) and Chioggia beets (Italian variety with leaves all green and pink-striped stems; root has cherry red, candy-striped flesh and has a sweet flavor).
-How to use: roots good in juices, soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store:  store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

SOURDOUGH FRENCH BREAD: Mill Pond Bread began in 1980 and quickly became a staple for handmade artisan bread in Ann Arbor. This Sourdough French is made with only four ingredients – spring water, celtic sea salt, unbleached/unbromated flour and sourdough culture that dates back over 100 years! Mill Pond Bread (www.millpondbread.com) are the newest kitchen tenants of the Washtenaw Food Hub! Check them out at the Saturday Ann Arbor Farmers Market and both Argus Farm Stops.
-How to use: toast, sandwiches, bread bowls, etc…
-How to store: wrap in wax or parchment paper and place in a plastic bag or bread box at room temperature
-How to freeze: double bag the loaf in plastic and store in the freezer until you’re ready to eat. When ready, place the frozen loaf in a preheated oven at 350 degrees for 30-40 minutes. Let cool & enjoy!

BRUSSELS SPROUTS: These tiny, green cabbage heads have a mildly pungent, mustard-like flavor and will be bagged with the white turnips.
-How to use: boil or steam for 5-10 minutes without overcooking, so they are still bright green; toss with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper, or a pat of butter; excellent roasted or stir-fried.
-How to store: refrigerate for up to a week or more unwashed in a plastic bag in hydrator drawer.

CABBAGE (Kaitlin):  large, late-season cabbage that is excellent for kraut with a very white, rather than green, interior after storage; stores well into December or January.
-How to use:  steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store: It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.  When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

CARROTS (Orange, Red, and Purple):  You will receive Chantenay (shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods), Nutri-Red (unique, coral-red roots, best cooked to deepen the color and improve the texture; excellent carrot flavor for stews and vegetable dishes), and Purple Haze (bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade, but exquisite served raw or roasted coins).
-How to use:  Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store:  Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks or longer.

KALE:  You will receive Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”). Kale is high in vitamins A, C, and K, folic acid, fiber, calcium and iron and has the highest protein content of all cultivated vegetables.
-How to use: for salads, soups, and light cooking
-How to store: keep in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 1 week

MICROGREENS (Pea Shoots & Sunflower Shoots): Researchers have found that most microgreens can contain up to 40 times higher levels of vital nutrients than their mature counterparts.  They help to alkalize your body, support your immune system and ensure proper cell regeneration.Garden Works Organic Farm is providing you with Pea Shoots (which are extremely high in vitamins A & C, betacarotene, folic acid, and calcium) and Sunflower Shoots (nutritional powerhouse packed with vitamins A, B complex, D, and E; and minerals including calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus).  They are a certified organic 4.5 acre truck garden and greenhouse farm in Ann Arbor operating year-round with several types of heirloom vegetables, wheatgrass, and other microgreens available throughout the year.  Garden Works sells produce at the AA Farmers Market, People’s Food Coop and both Argus Farm Stops. Contact Rob MacKercher at gardenworksorganic@gmail.com.
-How to use:  enhance a salad, garnish soups or main dishes, delicious stir-fried with garlic and sesame oil for Asian cooking
-How to store: store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

ONIONS (Copra): medium-sized, dark yellow-skinned storage onions; excellent storage onion staying firm and flavorful after most other varieties have sprouted; highest in sugar of the storage onions
-How to use: good in French onion soup, stews, casseroles, etc.
-How to store: can last for 10-12 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.
-How to freeze: if an onion develops soft spots, you can cut it open and remove the soft segment; chop up the rest of the onion and store in freezer bags.  Very easy and great way to store onions!

POTATOES:  You will receive the following varieties of potatoes in a net bag including:
*Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants!).
*Mountain Rose (rosy-skinned inside and out, these versatile, all-purpose spuds are deliciously moist, but not waxy textured. Excellent baked, mashed or fried)
*Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is good for baking or frying)
*Dakota Red (red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying)
*Harvest Moon (round, purple tubers with golden-yellow flesh; creamy, nutty flavor; can be mashed, baked, boiled, fried, but especially delicious in a hot potato salad)
*Rose Finn Apple Fingerling (rare and beautiful rose-colored fingerling with moderately dry, yellow flesh; delicious baked, boiled or roasted)
*Russian Banana Fingerling (an heirloom potato with small, banana-shaped tubers with yellow skin and light yellow flesh; used by chefs for its delicious flavor and smooth “waxy” texture that doesn’t fall apart when cooked; good baked, boiled, or in salads).
-How to store:  keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag or breathable container; ideal temperature is 38-48 degrees with high humidity (80-90%).  A basement or very cool closet will work.  If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout.

PARSNIPS: These long, cylindrical, creamy-white roots with sweet flavor will be bagged with the 2 kinds of winter radishes.
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, sauteed, steamed; our favorite way to prepare them is to roast with olive oil and fresh herbs.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

MUSHROOM POT PIE:  Harvest Kitchen and their new culinary team will contribute one of their delectable signature products, but with a seasonal twist, an Oyster Mushroom Pot Pie featuring Tantre oyster mushrooms and root vegetables, and as always  HK’s light,  flaky, and buttery crust. Harvest Kitchen produces their products in the kitchens at the Washtenaw Food Hub and sells at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market, Whole Foods, and both Argus Farm Stops.
-How to use: From the fridge reheat in the oven at 300 degrees for 20 minutes. From the freezer defrost in the fridge for 2 days and follow the fridge instructions.
-How to store: This pie can be stored in the fridge for up to 7 days or in the freezer for a month and are prebaked for your convenience.

DAIKON RADISH (K-N Bravo): This looks like an overgrown purple carrot with internal color ranging from pale purple to white with purple streaks; good, sweet, eating quality, and will be bagged with watermelon radish and parsnips.
-How to use:  excellent julienned, sliced, used in a salad or tossed with your favorite vinaigrette; good eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled
-How to store: not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks

WATERMELON RADISH: This heirloom Chinese variety is a large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta/pink flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste and will be bagged with the daikon radishes and the parsnips.
-How to use:  soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with your favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

SAUERKRAUT:   The Brinery is providing “Up North Kraut” for your probiotic pleasure.  The ingredients are Tantre cabbage, parsnips, and carrots.  Second Spring Farm, located at the base of Michigan’s fabled Leelanau Peninsula grows the root crops for this robust kraut. Aromatic and hearty, the earthy fragrance of the parsnip is the star of this ferment.  Reid Johnston, owner of Second Spring farm, is a former Tantre farm hand.  David and the Brinery are proud to unite Tantre and Second Spring Farm in this king of krauts. Longtime Washtenaw Food Hub kitchen tenant, The Brinery is a local foods business, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables, which are distributed all over Ann Arbor. It is operated by long time, former, Tantré farmer, David Klingenberger.  For more information, please visit www.thebrinery.com.
-How to use: Pairs well with mashed potatoes, roast beef, as well as tempeh and mushroom gravy.
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED up to 1 year or longer if you like the flavor, since it will get stronger with more age.

WHITE TURNIPS (Hakurei):  This white salad turnip with round, smooth roots with a sweet, fruity flavor and a crisp, tender texture will be bagged with the Brussels Sprouts.
-How to use:  Boil, steam, bake, add to soups and stews, mash or scallop just like potatoes, excellent roasted.
-How to store:  Keeps up to 1-2 weeks in the refrigerator in a plastic bag; can last for 4-5 months, if stored like beets, preferring cold and moist conditions.

WINTER SQUASH/PIE PUMPKIN: You will receive the following:
*Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh)
*Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh)
*Carnival (a multicolor Sweet Dumpling with colorful patches and flecks of dark and light green, orange, and yellow; sweet flesh and edible skin)
*Jester Acorn (about the size of Carnival squash, but with better eating quality; an oval, ivory-colored squash with green striping between the ribs that is tapered on both ends with small to average ribs)
*Baby Bear Pie Pumpkin (unique size and shape, and is often called “the perfect mini pumpkin” by growers; deep orange, and perfect in pies)
*Spaghetti (3-5-pounds, golden-yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size, only mildly sweet with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet)
*Sweet Dumpling (small 4-inch diameter, coloring is like the “Delicata”, but round, flat-topped shape; makes a great bowl for stuffing with rice, breading, or soups)
*Tetsukabuto (5-6 pound Japanese squash;  nearly round with dark green rind, slightly mottled and ribbed; sweet and nutty flavor with yellow, thick flesh)
-How to use: bake, steam, roast until tender in chunks, thin wedges or in half; mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store:  Some varieties can keep for several months at 45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature.
-How to freeze: If you notice a squash is getting soft or a spot starts to show rot, cut off the bad spot, and bake it, and freeze it in freezer bags for future use.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipes” at the end, and many recipe ideas will pop up.  Have fun searching!  Lots and lots of ideas!

APPLE STUFFED SQUASH (There is a Season: Cooking with the Good Things Grown in Michigan)
2 Acorn or Sweet Dumpling squash
3 Tbs. butter
2 chopped apples
1 chopped onion
2 c. cottage cheese
2 Tbs. lemon juice
3/4 c. grated cheddar cheese
1/4 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 c. raisins (optional)
Cut squash in half lengthwise; remove seeds.  Place face down on oiled baking sheet; bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour.  While squash is baking, sauté apples and onions in butter.  Add remaining ingredients to apples.  Stuff squash with mixture, covered, 15-20 minutes.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS & CARROT SALAD (Moosewood Restaurant Daily Special) Serves 4-6.
3 c. water
1/2 tsp. salt
3 large carrots, cut into 1-in. chunks
1 lb. Brussels sprouts, washed with stems cut off
freshly ground black pepper
fresh dill or parsley sprigs
diced onions (optional)
Vinaigrette Dressing:
1/4 c. canola or other vegetable oil
4 tsp. cider vinegar
4 tsp. prepared horseradish
1 Tbs. chopped fresh dill (1 tsp. dried)
1/4 tsp. salt
Bring the water and salt to a boil in covered saucepan.  Add the carrots and cook until just tender, 6-8 minutes.  Meanwhile, halve any Brussels sprouts larger than 1-inch across.  When the carrots are tender, remove and set aside in a large bowl.  Ease the Brussels sprouts into the boiling water and cook until tender, about 6-8 minutes.  While the Brussels sprouts cook, whisk together all the dressing ingredients in a small bowl.  After the Brussels sprouts are tender, drain and add them to carrots.  Pour the dressing over the vegetables and toss gently.  Serve immediately or chill for about 30 minutes.  Garnish with pepper and a few dill or parsley sprigs.  If desired, add red onions for color and spark.

BRAISED DAIKON (from Winter Harvest Cookbook) Serves 4.
1 Daikon radish, peeled and diced
2 Tbs. light cooking oil
1 tsp. sugar (or honey)
1 1/2 Tbs. soy sauce
Put Daikon in saucepan, cover with water, and boil 5 minutes.  Drain well.  Heat skillet, add oil, and stir-fry Daikon for 2 minutes.  Add sugar and soy sauce; stir fry another minute.  Add 1/4 cup water, cover, and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until Daikon is tender, but not mushy, about 30 minutes.  Serve hot.

TANTRE FARM OVEN-ROASTED HARVEST VEGETABLES (Keep in mind, any combination of the following root vegetables will work.  Roasted veggies are standard at many Tantre Farm meals.) Makes 6-8 servings.
1 c. Brussels sprouts, cut in halves
1 c. carrots, quartered or chunks
1 c. parsnips, quartered or chunks
1/2 lb. unpeeled multi-colored potatoes, cut into chunks if large
1 watermelon radish and/or Daikon radish, julienned
3-4 onions, sliced
1 c. turnips, cut into chunks
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 c. winter squash, cut into chunks
3-4 Tbs. vegetable or olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
2 tsp. chopped fresh sage or rosemary
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Combine any combination of vegetables above in large bowl, except parsley.  Drizzle oil over.  Sprinkle with garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper; toss gently to coat.  Bake for 30 minutes in 1 or 2 roasting pans or until vegetables are beginning to slightly brown. Turn the vegetables 2 or 3 times during cooking to prevent burning.  Then increase heat to 425° and add chopped parsley (or may be added as a fresh garnish at the very end), toss vegetables, and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring once, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned.

SHEPHERD’S PIE (from Chef Dan Vernia)
2 pounds potatoes, washed and cubed
2 tablespoons sour cream or softened cream cheese
1 large egg yolk
1/2 cup cream, for a lighter version use vegetable or chicken broth
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, 1 turn of the pan
1 3/4 pounds ground beef
1 carrot, peeled and chopped
1-2 onions, chopped
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup beef stock or broth
2 teaspoons Worcestershire, eyeball it
1 cup chopped fresh kale
1 cup fresh corn kernels
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves
Boil potatoes in salted water until tender, about 12 minutes. Drain potatoes and pour them into a bowl. Combine sour cream, egg yolk and cream. Add the cream mixture into potatoes and mash until potatoes are almost smooth. While potatoes boil, preheat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add oil to hot pan with beef. Season meat with salt and pepper. Brown and crumble meat for 3 or 4 minutes. Add carrot, onion, corn and kale to the meat. Cook veggies with meat for 3-4 minutes, stirring frequently. In a second small skillet over medium heat cook butter and flour together 2 minutes. Whisk in broth and Worcestershire sauce. Thicken gravy 1 minute. Add gravy to meat and vegetables. Preheat broiler to high. Fill a small rectangular casserole with meat and vegetable mixture. Spoon potatoes over meat evenly. Top potatoes with paprika and broil 6 to 8 inches from the heat until potatoes are evenly browned. Top casserole dish with chopped parsley and serve.

ETHIOPIAN CABBAGE DISH (from http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/152937/ethiopian-cabbage-dish)  Serves 5
1/2 cup olive oil
4 carrots, thinly sliced
1 onion, thinly sliced
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp ground turmeric
1/2 head cabbage, shredded
5 potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat.  Cook the carrots and onion in the hot oil about 5 minutes.  Stir in the salt, pepper, cumin, turmeric, and cabbage and cook another 15-20 minutes.  Add the potatoes; cover.  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until potatoes are soft, 20-30 minutes.

ITALIAN PEASANT SOUP (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC)  Makes 8 1/2 cups
1/4 cup white wine
1 cup finely chopped onions
1 cup finely diced celery or celeraic
1 cup finely diced carrots
1 1/2 cup peeled and diced potatoes
1 1/2 cup peeled and diced parsnips
8 cups vegetable stock or water
1/2 tsp thyme
2 tsp crushed garlic
1 Tbsp soy sauce
2 cups chopped kale
Combine wine, onions, celery, and carrots in large pot over medium heat, and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender, about 25 minutes.  Stir in potatoes, parsnips, stock, thyme, garlic, and soy sauce.  Bring to simmer, cover and cook over low heat until potatoes are not quite tender, about 15 minutes.  Add greens and cook 10-15 minutes longer.

CARROT PUDDING (from AllRecipes.com by Judith Nees)
1.5 pounds carrots, chopped
2 eggs
3/4 cups white sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Steam or boil carrots until tender; mash. In an electric mixer with whisk attachment or by hand, beat eggs into carrots, one at a time. Beat in sugar, vanilla and baking powder. Fold in flour. Pour into a 2 quart baking dish.   Bake in preheated oven 30 minutes, until puffed and set.

CHIOGGIA BEETS WITH RASPBERRY MINT VINAIGRETTE (from www.epicurious.com) Serves 4.
1 lb beets (4 to 6; preferably Chioggia), 1 inch of stems left intact
3 tablespoons thinly sliced scallions or onion
2 to 2 1/2 tablespoons raspberry vinegar
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice, or to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
1 tablespoon finely grated fresh orange zest (from 2 oranges)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup olive oil
Garnish: fresh mint sprigs
Cover beets with water by 1 inch in a 2- to 3-quart saucepan and simmer until tender when pierced in center with a fork, about 30 minutes. Drain in a colander and rinse under cold running water. Let stand until cool enough to handle, then slip off and discard skins. Cut beets into 1/4-inch-thick slices.   While beets are cooking, stir together scallions, 2 tablespoons vinegar, lemon juice to taste, mint, zest, salt, and pepper in a bowl. Add oil in a slow stream, whisking until combined. Add warm beets and toss with vinaigrette and vinegar and salt to taste. Serve warm or slightly chilled.

2017 Thanksgiving Share

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
THANKSGIVING SHARE
November 18, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING, EVERYONE!
For the cold, gray, sodden upcoming months we can take refuge in roasting roots as they waft sweet smells out of the oven. We can take refuge in these roots and the big heads of cabbage and cauliflower for crunchy salad making. We can take refuge in the gift of the sun, the moon, and the earth in the form of hard squashes. When we find ourselves at the end of a dreary, gray week we can roast a squash, the perfect symmetry of the sun, the moon, and the earth together–radiating the calm, slow release of the sweet starches into our body mind.

Please feel free to give us a call or e-mail throughout the late fall and early winter, if you are interested in more greens, squash, potatoes, radishes, turnips, spinach, onions, garlic, etc. and are willing to pick up your order at the farm. After the Thanksgiving Distribution we are planning on being at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market on the following Wednesday, Nov. 22, for any last minute Thanksgiving purchases, but NOT on Sat. Nov. 25. We are hoping to continue coming to the Ann Arbor market on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout December and then only Saturdays for January through April. We will continue to be at the Chelsea Winter Farmers Market on Nov. 25 and into the following 2 Saturdays of December. If you have “liked” us on Tantre Farm’s Facebook page, you will know when we are coming and what we are bringing, since we will try to keep you updated. Also, throughout the fall and winter, we will deliver our produce into Ann Arbor for the People’s Food Coop and Argus Farm Stop on Liberty and Packard.

If you are interested in our Summer CSA shares for 2018, our online registration will start soon. Just check our website. We will be sending you a separate email as well to let you know when registration opens.

The vegetables for this last distribution have been compiled into 2 big (1-3/4 bushel) boxes. Your herbs of parsley and rosemary will be on the side. You will also receive 2 jars of The Brinery’s sauerkraut on the side. You may want to bring your own containers or bags, if you don’t want to haul the boxes home. Otherwise, you can return them at another time to the Farm or the AA Farmers’ Market throughout this winter. Most of the following items can be stored for long-term (especially the root vegetables) or preserved very simply, so please note storage or simple cooking tips listed below, in the ASPARAGUS TO ZUCCHINI cookbook (p. 191), or on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

This Thanksgiving Share is a sampling of this year’s fall harvest and a testament to this year’s hardworking hands. Thank you for being part of our CSA. We hope you enjoy this abundant Thanksgiving Distribution. Thanks for buying locally and seasonally. We wish you a safe, healthy, and enjoyable Thanksgiving!
–Deb, Richard & the 2017 Tantre Farm Crew

UPCOMING EVENT: We would like to encourage you to attend the 3rd Annual AGRARIAN ADVENTURE’S HARVEST BRUNCH fundraiser on Sun. Nov. 19 from 10 AM until 1 PM at Great Oak Cohousing Common House (500 Little Lake Dr., Ann Arbor). Just FYI for you all to know that parking is on the street. Deb has been a board member for the past 7 years, and continues to visit classrooms for the “Farmer in the Classroom” program. The Agrarian Adventure (www.agrarianadventure.org) also provides other programming for school gardens, and afterschool garden clubs. Tantre Farm always donates every year to this awesome, family-friendly fundraiser. The menu below prepared by Chef Chris Chiapelli of the UM Ross School of Business & Black Pearl looks awesome:
***Tantre Farm Heirloom Veggie Hash with or without eggs, Roasted Pumpkin and Squash Pancakes with maple syrup or whipped cream & smoked brown sugar, Mighty Good Coffee Waffles with Tahitian vanilla bean infused syrup and Mindo chocolate sauce, Slow Farms Roasted Acorn Squash Bowl with vanilla yogurt, granola and fall fruits. Vegan and gluten-free options available, and all can be paired with breakfast meats from Steinhauser and Black Oak Farms. Many other farms and food artisans have contributed as well! Please come to the brunch and find out who. Hope to see you there this coming Sunday!

WHAT’S PART OF YOUR SHARE?

BEETS: This beet variety will be in a mixed net bag of topless roots; this is Red Ace baby beets (round, smooth, deep red roots with sweet flavor when eaten raw or cooked).
-How to use: roots good in juices, soups, stews, roasted, boiled, steamed, excellent grated raw into salads or baked goods.
-How to store: store unwashed in plastic bags in hydrator drawer of refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS: You will receive 1-2 stalks of tiny, green cabbage-like sprouts with mildly pungent, mustard-like flavor. These sprouts are very easy to break off and seem to store better while still on the stalk until ready for use.
-How to use: Boil or steam for 5-10 minutes without overcooking, so they are still bright green; toss with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper, or a pat of butter; excellent roasted or stir-fried.
-How to store: Refrigerate for up to a week or more unwashed in a plastic bag in hydrator drawer.
-How to freeze: Blanch sprouts for 3-4 minutes, rinse in cold water, drain, and store in air-tight bags or container.

CABBAGE (Kaitlin): large, late-season cabbage that is excellent for kraut with a very white, rather than green, interior after storage; should store well until December or January.
-How to use: steamed, stir-fried, chopped into salads or coleslaw.
-How to store: You will receive this unpeeled and unwashed, so that it will store better, so the leaves may look a little dirty or brown. It is best to store cabbage with its protective outer leaves until ready to use, so that it will last in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. When ready to eat, just peel off a few layers until you get to the crispy, clean leaves that will make it ready for eating.

CARROTS (Orange and Purple): You will receive a mixed rainbow bag of these topless, frost-sweetened carrots with an orange variety called Chantenay (shorter than other cultivars, but have greater girth with broad shoulders and taper towards a blunt, rounded tip; most commonly diced for use in canned or prepared foods) and Purple Haze (bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade).
-How to use: Can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: Refrigerate dry and unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks; stores best in near freezing conditions around 32 degrees and 95% humidity; greens may last up to a week refrigerated in plastic bag .

CAULIFLOWER: You will receive Romanesco (lime green, spiraled heads with pointed, spiraled pinnacles; crisp and mild).
-How to use: Raw for salads and dips, steamed, sautéed, or roasted.
-How to store: Sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.
-How to freeze: Blanch 2-4 minutes, rinse under cold water, drain and dry, pack into freezer bags.

GARLIC: You will receive 4 bulbs of German White (a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system).
-How to use: Excellent in all cooking; make garlic butter with 1/2 cup of softened butter mashed with four minced cloves of garlic
-How to store: store for several months in a cool, dark, dry, well-ventilated place; if cloves begin to get soft or moldy, break off bad part, chop, and pack into small jar filled with olive oil, then refrigerate (great gift idea!).

FRESH HERBS: Everyone will receive 2 Herbs: Parsley (dark green leaves—curly or flat-leaf are interchangeable–strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces) and Rosemary (pine needle-like leaves used with potatoes, bread doughs, risottos, mixed vegetables, and meat dishes, as well as in sweet dishes such as lemonade, creams, custards, and syrups).
-How to store: Place in plastic bag and store in refrigerator up to a week or put herb bunch in jar with 2 inches of water, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

KALE: You will receive the top crown of Green Curly (well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”).
-How to use: Boil for 2-3 minutes or steam for 3-5 minutes, until color brightens (Colors will darken or fade if overcooked, and then can be mushy, tasteless, and less nutritious), and then toss with red wine vinegar/olive oil/salt/pepper, or sesame oil/rice vinegar/soy sauce, or lemon vinaigrette, or just butter and salt; mix greens (most are interchangeable in recipes) into omelets, quiches, lasagna, casseroles, soups, stews, and gravies.
-How to store: Refrigerate unwashed in plastic bag for to 2 weeks.
-How to freeze: Blanch washed greens for 1-2 minutes, rinse in cold water, drain, and pack into air-tight containers, or just destem, chop, and freeze in bags.

ONIONS: You will receive a few bulbs of Patterson (medium-large, blocky bulbs with dark yellow skin and thin necks; excellent storage onion) and Red Hawk (medium to large, uniform, deep red bulbs).
-How to use: good in French onion soup, great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, grilled.
-How to store: can last for 3 to 6 months if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

PARSNIPS: long, cylindrical, creamy-white roots with sweet flavor; contain small amounts of iron and vitamin C.
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, sauteed, steamed; our favorite way to prepare them is to roast with olive oil and fresh herbs.
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks.

POTATOES: Everyone will receive mixed bags of the following varieties of potatoes including Carola (yellow potato from Germany; smooth, creamy texture that is good for baking or frying) and Adirondack Blue (round to oblong, slightly flattened tubers have glistening blue skin enclosing deep blue flesh; moist, flavorful flesh is superb for mashing or salads; very high in antioxidants), Dakota Red (red potato with white flesh that is good for baking, boiling, or frying), and Russian Banana Fingerling (an heirloom potato with small, banana-shaped tubers with yellow skin and light yellow flesh; used by chefs for its delicious flavor and smooth “waxy” texture that doesn’t fall apart when cooked; good baked, boiled, or in salads).
-How to store: keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag; ideal temperature is 40-50 degrees with high humidity (80-90%). A basement or very cool closet will work. If too warm or stored with onions or apples, they will shrivel and sprout; light turns them green; don’t refrigerate, since the starches turn to sugars.

PIE PUMPKIN (Baby Bear): bright orange skin with dry, sweet flesh
-How to use: Excellent for pies (For other ideas see winter squash)
-How to store: store whole pumpkins at room temperature up to a month or for 2 to 3 months in moderately cool conditions (45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity).
-How to freeze: Bake pumpkin until fork tender at 350 degrees, purée and put cooked pulp in freezer bags.

DAIKON RADISH: This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag of topless roots; this is K-N Bravo (looks like an overgrown carrot with beautiful, lavender-purple color; good, sweet, eating quality).
-How to use: excellent julienned, sliced, used in a salad or tossed with your favorite vinaigrette; good eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled
-How to store: not as hardy as you may think, so store wrapped in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks

WATERMELON RADISH: This radish variety will be in a mixed net bag of topless roots; this is as an heirloom Chinese variety; large, 2-4”, round radishes with unique dark magenta flesh and light green/white skin along with a sweet, delicious taste; very mild.
-How to use: soups, stews, steamed, roasted, eaten raw in salads, pickled, excellent julienned and tossed with favorite dressing.
-How to store: Store dry and unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; can last for 2-4 months if stored in cold, moist conditions like beets.

BABY RAPINI: also called “Broccoli Raab” or Rabe; leafy green with 6- to 9-inch stalks usually with scattered clusters of tiny broccoli-like buds, but ours don’t have buds yet, so just the leaf; traditional Italian specialty combining qualities of broccoli and mustard greens.
-How to use: used for salads or light cooking; to cook simply: clean rapini with water, oil pan, add garlic and brown. Add 1 cup of water. Put in rapini, season to taste. (Lemon may be used if desired.) Cover pan and steam for thirty minutes. Pepperoni or sausage may be added to rapini after it is fully cooked.
-How to store: wrap in dampened cloth in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

SAUERKRAUT: We are pleased to offer 2 jars of the Brinery’s products. There will be a few different varieties to choose from. The Brinery is a local foods business, specializing in naturally fermented local vegetables and operated by long time Tantré farmer alum, David Klingenberger. For more information, please visit www.thebrinery.com.
-How to use: use as a condiment with any dish, especially meat dishes, salads, roasted veggies, or sandwiches.
-How to store: Must be REFRIGERATED up to 1 year or longer depending on how you like the flavor, since it will get stronger with more age. *NOTE: This sauerkraut jar has NOT been canned, so store in refrigerator.
***
Background & Recipes: http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-11-27/entertainment/bs-md-sauerkraut-and-turkey-20131125_1_sauerkraut-reuben-sandwich-cabbage!
www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Turkey-with-Sauerkraut-Riesling-and-Pork-Sausages
www.timesunion.com/living/article/Sauerkraut-on-New-Year-s-a-Pennsylvania-tradition-561496.php
www.cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016892-sauerkraut-and-apples

WHITE HAKUREI TURNIPS and GREENS: A white salad turnip with round, smooth roots that have a sweet, fruity flavor with a crisp, tender texture. Both roots (good source of Vitamin C, potassium, and calcium; good in salads and soups) and greens (slightly sweet and can be boiled, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, and since hairless, are good in salads; excellent source of vitamins A & C and good source of riboflavin, calcium and iron) are edible!
-How to use: good in salads and soups, roasted, steamed, sautéed,
-How to store: remove greens from turnip root and store separately in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days; roots can last for 4-5 months, if stored like beets, preferring cold and moist conditions.

WINTER SQUASH: It’s been a great squash year! You will receive all of the following varieties:
*Acorn (small, green ribbed squash with pale yellow flesh)
*Buttercup Kabocha (green, blocky, with a gray “button” on the blossom end; thick, dry, deep orange flesh; medium-dry and sweet; dry storage)
*Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash)
*Carnival (multicolor Sweet Dumpling with colorful patches and flecks of dark and light green, orange, and yellow; sweet flesh and edible skin)
*Jester Acorn (about the size of Carnival squash, but with better eating quality; an oval, ivory-colored squash with green striping between the ribs that is tapered on both ends with small to average ribs)
*Pikes Peak (an heirloom variety, oblong, teardrop-shaped, slate-blue colored fruit; has thick orange flesh that is sweet and tasty; excellent keeper; believed to be of Native American origin, possibly from Mexico)
*Spaghetti (3-5-pounds, golden yellow, oblong, smooth, medium size, only mildly sweet with “spaghetti” (stringy) flesh; bake like squash or boil and fork out the flesh, topping the “spaghetti” flesh with your favorite sauce; mildly sweet)
*Tetsukabuto (5-6 pound Japanese squash; nearly round with dark green rind, slightly mottled and ribbed; sweet and nutty flavor with yellow, thick flesh)

-How to use: Slice in half, scoop seeds out and bake with a little water in baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until tender; boil or steam chunks for 15-20 minutes, or until tender (peel skins off “before” or “after“ cooked, but “after” is easiest when it’s cooled); mash cooked squash with butter; purée cooked squash for creamy soup, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal.
-How to store: Keep for several months (depending on the variety) at 45-60 degrees with 60-75% humidity; will also store at room temperature. Here is a great link, which offers good advice for storing winter squash: https://bonnieplants.com/library/how-to-store-winter-squash/

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar” with the word “recipe” after it.

TANTRÉ FARM SLAW (A simple, easy salad!) Serves 4.
2 medium beets, grated
3 large carrots, grated
1 parsnip, grated
1 watermelon radish, grated
sesame or sunflower seeds, toasted
olive oil
lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
Grate vegetables into a bowl. Chop onion, if desired, and add to bowl. Toast sesame or sunflower seeds. Add when cooled. Add olive oil and lemon juice as a salad dressing to suit your taste. Be careful of too much liquid. The tartness of the lemon should be prominent. Serve immediately or marinate for a few hours in the refrigerator. Variations: Add grated turnips, daikon, cabbage, etc.

TANTRE FARM OVEN-ROASTED HARVEST VEGETABLES
**Keep in mind, any combination of the following root vegetables will work. Roasted veggies are standard at many Tantre Farm meals. Yummy!
1 c. Brussels sprouts, cut in halves
1 c. carrots, quartered or chunks
1/2 lb. unpeeled multi-colored potatoes, cut into chunks if large
1 watermelon or daikon radish, julienned
2 onions, sliced
2 parsnips, cut into chunks
1 c. turnips, cut into chunks
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 c. winter squash, cut into chunks
3-4 Tbs. vegetable or olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
2 tsp. chopped fresh parsley
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Combine any combination of vegetables above in large bowl, except parsley. Drizzle oil over. Sprinkle with garlic, herbs, salt and pepper; toss gently to coat. Bake for 30 minutes in 1 or 2 roasting pans or until vegetables are beginning to slightly brown. Turn the vegetables 2 or 3 times during cooking to prevent burning. Then increase heat to 425° and add chopped parsley (or may be added as a fresh garnish at the very end), toss vegetables, and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring once, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned. Makes 6-8 servings.

WHOLE ROASTED ROMANESCO WITH LEMON, GARLIC, AND THYME (https://www.landeeseelandeedo.com/recipe/whole-roasted-romanesco-with-lemon-garlic-and-thyme) 5-6 servings
1head Romanesco cauliflower
1 1/2-Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 medium lemon
zest from 1/2 lemon
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2-tsp. fresh thyme or rosemary, minced
1 medium onion, sliced
3 sprigs fresh thyme or rosemary
generous sprinkle salt and pepper
1/8-tsp crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
1/8-cup Parmesan cheese (optional)
Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F. Trim the romanesco’s stem and leaves, then lay flat on a rimmed baking sheet. Tuck shallot slices and springs of thyme underneath the romanesco. Drizzle or brush olive oil over the head of romanesco, then rub the crushed garlic and lemon zest over it with your fingers. Squeeze juice from half of a lemon over top, then season generously with salt and pepper. If a little heat is desired, add 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon of crushed red pepper flakes. Cook in the center of the oven for 40-50 minutes, until golden brown and softened (you can cook longer if you want the romanesco more tender). Remove from oven and squeeze juice from remaining lemon half over the romanesco. If desired, sprinkle freshly grated Parmesan cheese on top. To serve, slice romanesco like a cake into generous wedges. Garnish with additional cheese, if desired. Option to pair with aioli, marinara sauce, or your favorite dipping sauce.

ITALIAN PEASANT SOUP (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC) Makes 8 1/2 cups
1/4 cup white wine
1 cup finely chopped onions
1 cup finely diced celery or celeraic
1 cup finely diced carrots
1 1/2 cup peeled and diced potatoes
1 1/2 cup peeled and diced parsnips
8 cups vegetable stock or water
1/2 tsp thyme
2 tsp crushed garlic
1 Tbsp soy sauce
2 cups chopped kale
Combine wine, onions, celery, and carrots in large pot over medium heat, and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender, about 25 minutes. Stir in potatoes, parsnips, stock, thyme, garlic, and soy sauce. Bring to simmer, cover and cook over low heat until potatoes are not quite tender, about 15 minutes. Add greens and cook 10-15 minutes longer.

MARTHA STEWART’S PUMPKIN SOUP IN A PUMPKIN (from www.recipezaar.com) Serves 6.
6 cups chicken stock
2-3 cups pared pumpkin, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1 cup thinly sliced onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon fresh sage or rosemary leaves
5 peppercorns
1 medium pie pumpkin
1/2 cup heavy cream, warmed
1 teaspoon chopped fresh, parsley
In a covered saucepan, heat the stock, cubed pumpkin, onion, garlic, salt, thyme, and peppercorns to boiling; reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, 20 minutes. Remove 1/2 cup of the pumpkin with a slotted spoon; reserve. Simmer remaining pumpkin mixture, uncovered, 20 minutes longer; transfer to a large bowl. Preheat oven to 350F degrees. Cut the top off the sugar pumpkin and remove the seeds. Place the pumpkin on a baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes; set aside in a warm spot. Puree 2 cups of the pumpkin mixture in a blender or food processor; return pureed mixture to the pot. Repeat with remaining pumpkin mixture. Heat pureed mixture to boiling; reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Stir warm cream and reserved pumpkin into soup. Place the warmed sugar pumpkin on a platter; ladle the soup in and garnish with parsley. Serve hot.

DAIKON IN PLUM SAUCE (from Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables by John Peterson) Serves 3 to 4.
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons plum sauce
1 tablespoon minced scallion
3 tablespoons peanut oil
1 daikon radish, peeled, cut into matchstick-sized strips (could add watermelon radish as well)
2 tablespoons water
Combine the soy sauce, vinegar, and cornstarch in a small bowl; stir until cornstarch dissolves. Stir in the plum sauce and scallions. Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Swirl the oil around the wok so that it covers the cooking area, then add the daikon; cook, stirring constantly, for 30 seconds. Add the water; cover. Cook until the daikon is tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the soy sauce mixture and continue cooking, stirring vigorously, until the sauce has thickened, 2 to 3 minutes.

GRATED BEET AND CARROT SALAD
3-4 beets, grated
3-4 carrots and/or turnips, grated
1 finely chopped onion (or bunch of scallions or leeks)
1/3 cup cider vinegar
2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 tsp honey
Pour over vinegar and honey, mix and let marinate.

TETSUKABUTO SQUASH PIE (from Backwoods Home Cooking)
1 9-inch unbaked pie shell
2 cups mashed or pureed, cooked pulp of Tetsukabuto squash
1/2 tsp. vanilla
10 oz. evaporated milk
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 Tbsp. unbleached flour
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. ginger
1/3 cup chopped pecans
Thoroughly mix pulp, vanilla, and milk. Mix sugar, flour, nutmeg, and ginger together and stir into the wet mixture. Pour into the pie shell and bake in 375° oven until the middle of pie is almost firm but still sticky. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with pecans. Continue baking until a straw inserted in the center comes out clean. Entire baking time takes 40-45 minutes.

MIDNIGHT SUNSET: A GINGER AND BEET JUICE COOLER (from Learning to Eat Locally) Makes 1/2 gallon.
1 qt cooking water from 5-6 beets cooked in 2 qts water
1 qt water
1 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 cup lemon juice
1 1/2 Tbsp coarsely chopped ginger
Ice
Ginger ale (optional)
In a gallon jug or plastic juice container, combine beet juice, water (reserving 1 cup), sugar, lemon juice, stirring until sugar is dissolved. In a small saucepan, bring the reserved cup of water and ginger to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, and simmer until water is reduced to about half of its original volume. Strain ginger liquid into beet juice, discarding ginger pieces. Cover and chill in refrigerator for at least an hour. Shake before serving, and pour over ice. If you are using ginger ale, pour equal parts ale and Midnight Sunset in each glass, or combine them to taste.

Ext. Week 3: October 29 – November 4, 2017

TANTRE FARM CSA NEWSLETTER
Extended Fall CSA Share
Week 3
Oct. 29-Nov. 4, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published often before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BRUSSELS SPROUTS: tiny, green cabbage heads with mildly pungent, mustard-like flavor.
-How to use: boil or steam for 5-10 minutes without overcooking, so they are still bright green; toss with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper, or a pat of butter; excellent roasted or stir-fried.
-How to store: refrigerate for up to a week or more unwashed in a plastic bag in hydrator drawer.

BROCCOLI: emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems.
-How to use: use raw, steamed, sautéed, stir-fried, in casseroles, soups, pizzas, etc.
-How to store: store loosely in plastic bag for up to a week

CARROTS (Purple Haze): bright purplish-red roots with bright orange interior and a sweet flavor; cooking will cause the color to fade.
-How to use: can be used raw as carrot sticks, grated in salads or juiced; steamed or sautéed, in stews, soups, casseroles, stir-fries
-How to store: refrigerate dry, unwashed roots in plastic bag for up to 2 weeks

CAULIFLOWER (Amazing): medium-sized, white heads with domed, solid curds.
-How to use: Raw for salads and dips, steamed, sautéed, or roasted.
-How to store: Sweetest and best when used within a week when stored in the refrigerator, but can last up to 2 weeks.

EGGPLANT: You will receive a few of these last tastes of summer, Nadia (slender, purplish-black, glossy-like, bell-shaped fruit) or Orient Express (dark purple Asian type with long, slender, glossy fruits, which are delicately flavored and quick cooking).
-How to use: can be baked, boiled, fried, grilled, or can be sliced into rounds for grilling or broiling; cut into cubes for stews and stir-fries.
-How to store: best fresh, but can be stored at room temperature or in refrigerator drawer for up to 1 week.

KALE: You will receive Rainbow Lacinato Kale (unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins).
-How to use: for salads, soups, braised, and light cooking
-How to store: keep in plastic bag or damp towel in refrigerator

ONIONS: You will receive Patterson (medium-large, blocky bulbs with dark yellow skin and thin necks; excellent storage onion).
-How to use: great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, onion rings, and other dishes for flavor
-How to store: will store for six months or more, if kept in a cold, dark place, but remove any ones starting to go soft from the others.

GREEN SWEET PEPPERS: typical green bell pepper with large blocky cells with fruity, sweet flavor
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in fridge drawer for 1-2 weeks.

SWEET PEPPERS (Red Knight): a mix of big, blocky, thick-walled, green-to-red peppers with sweet flesh
-How to use: eat raw for best nutrient retention; can be added to soups, stews, omelets, quiches, stir-fries, etc.; excellent stuffed.
-How to store: refrigerate unwashed in fridge drawer for 1-2 weeks.

POTATOES (Russian Banana Fingerling): an heirloom potato with small, banana-shaped tubers with yellow skin and light yellow flesh; used by chefs for its delicious flavor and smooth “waxy” texture that doesn’t fall apart when cooked; good baked, boiled, or in salads.
-How to store: Keep unwashed in cool, dark place in paper bag.

PURPLE DAIKON RADISH: You will receive K-N Bravo (looks like an overgrown carrot with inside flesh pale purple with purple streaks; good, sweet, eating quality).
-How to use: excellent julienned, sliced, used in a salad or tossed with your favorite vinaigrette; good eaten fresh, cooked, or pickled
-How to store: wrap in plastic to keep them crisp for up to 2 weeks

RADISHES (Easter Egg): a beautiful mix of red, purple, pink, and white round radishes; crisp and mild flavor.
-How to use: raw, roasted, used in soups, sliced in salads, stir-fried
-How to store: refrigerate in plastic bag/damp towel for 1-2 weeks.

BABY RAPINI (Broccoli Raab): leafy green with 6- to 9-inch stalks and without clusters of tiny broccoli-like buds (most of ours grew to maturity without the buds, so just the leaf); traditional Italian specialty combining qualities of broccoli and mustard greens.
-How to use: used for salads or light cooking; to cook simply: clean rapini with water, oil pan, add garlic and brown. Add 1 cup of water. Put in rapini, season to taste. (Lemon may be used if desired.) Cover pan and steam for thirty minutes. Pepperoni or sausage may be added to rapini after it is fully cooked.
-How to store: put in plastic bag for up to 1 week.

WINTER SQUASH: You will receive Butternut (light, tan-colored skin; small seed cavities with thick, cylindrical necks; bright orange, moist, sweet flesh; longest storage potential of all squash) and Blue Hubbard (blue-green, big fruits are tapered at the ends and have a bumpy, hard shell; averages in the 12-15 lb. range with some larger; medium-dry, medium-sweet, yellow flesh).
-How to use: bake, roast, mash or puree cooked squash; use in creamy soups, or add uncooked chunks to soups or stews; add small amounts to yeast breads, muffins, cookies, pies, oatmeal, etc.
-How to store: Keeps for several months (depending on the variety) at room temperature.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. FINAL WEEK OF EXTENDED FALL CSA: Please return share boxes & bring extra bags! Please return any forgotten boxes from past weeks. You may bring bags, a cooler or other containers to transfer your produce from the boxes at your distribution site, especially this week, which is your final week of Ex. Fall Shares. We also can use any extra “GROCERY” paper or plastic bags.

2. THANKSGIVING CSA Registration is OPEN! This share is a one-time pick-up of 60 to 80 pounds of produce for winter storage or to stock up on vegetables before the holiday for $120. It is available for pick up on Nov. 18 (the Saturday before Thanksgiving) at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market from 7 A.M. until Noon, Tantré Farm from 2-5 P.M., and Pure Pastures in Plymouth from 9 AM – 7 PM. More details can be found on our website.

3. THANKSGIVING TURKEYS: Thanksgiving turkeys are available to order from Two Tracks Acres, a 10 acre farm in Grass Lake, Michigan. These are free-range, broad-breasted bronze turkeys that range 13-25 pounds. Turkeys are $4.50/lb, and are fresh (not frozen) with on farm pickup the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. Contact Stephanie Willette at twotracksacres@gmail.com or visit the website www.twotracksacres.com.

4. INTERESTED IN JOINING OUR CSA IN 2018? Summer CSA Shares will be available for $650 for 20 weeks from June through the middle of October. We will be offering “online registration” for Summer Shares very soon, so you will all receive a separate email informing you when registration opens, so please consider signing up for another year. We will be accepting deposits or alternative payment proposals. We welcome new members, so tell your friends and family!!

5. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDERS:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed)–9 A.M. To 7 P.M.

REFLECTIONS ON THE FARM
by Richard and Deb

The bright yellow leaves have all, but a few, blown away on the persimmon trees. Now the tree branches dangle in the wind with wrinkly, burnt orange persimmons like so many apricot-colored, sugar plums. The bees do not come to the edge of their door on the bottom of their bee hive on these cool, fall days. They are all inside clustered around their queen. The cool, almost frozen, nights crystalize the dew and water vapor painting the Brussels sprouts, kale, cauliflower, and broccoli leaves with thick, silvery frost, sweetening each leaf with a frozen kiss!

The last of the carrots are being pulled from the cool, wet earth, and brought up to the root cellar along with the turnips, radishes, beets, and storage cabbage. Every morning for the past few weeks we spend hours breaking garlic bulbs into individual cloves inside the dimly lit barn before the first light of day. Almost 1300 pounds of garlic are ready to plant in the next couple of weeks. The tomato vines have been cut down with the twine wrapped up and the stakes pulled out for almost one mile of dead, rattling, spent tomato vines. The winter squash and pumpkins have been boxed up into thousands of 50-lb. crates. Onions have been sorted and resorted and stacked in baskets as high as the hands can reach next to the crates of squash in the big red barn.

It seems this mild, fall weather will provide us with an abundant supply of root vegetables for the next 4 to 5 months, which we hope will satisfy our supportive community of members, who may be interested in continuing to receive produce through our November Thanksgiving CSA, our December Solstice CSA, and possibly other opportunities for stocking up on local Tantre vegetables throughout the winter. We also would like to encourage you to help us plan for next Summer of 2018 by signing up early for our Summer CSA with a deposit or full payment to help us purchase seeds, repair equipment, and make plans for the Summer bounty.

We are grateful to the whole Tantre community of members, volunteers, farm workers, the earth, the sun, and the rain for this bountiful harvest. Please feel free to contact us at the farm or come visit us at the Winter Chelsea Farmers Market & Ann Arbor Farmers Market throughout the fall and winter. Thank you for being a member of the Tantre Farm Extended Fall CSA!!

RECIPES

SOUTHWEST COLACHE (from Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
2 Tbsp oil (veggie or olive)
1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, diced
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
16 oz chopped tomatoes, fresh or canned, undrained
1 bell pepper, seeded, chopped
14 oz whole kernel corn
1 green chili, chopped (optional)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Grated cheese, for topping (optional)
Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add squash, onion, and garlic; cook for 5 minutes or until onion is tender. Add tomatoes and bell pepper to skillet. Bring to simmer, cover and let simmer for 15 minutes over low heat. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer covered, 5 minutes, or until squash is tender. Uncover; increase heat to high and continue cooking a few minutes or until most liquid has evaporated. Top with grated cheese, if desired.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS, BROCCOLI & CAULIFLOWER CASSEROLE (www.mamachallenge.com) Serves 12
2 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream (or heavy cream alternative)
1/3 cup chopped onions
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup bread crumbs
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, quartered
1 medium head of broccoli, cut into small (1-inch) florets
1 1 medium head of cauliflower, cut into small (1-inch) florets
1 1/2 cups grated parmesan cheese (divided use)
1 cup white cheddar, cut into small (1-inch) cubes
Salt, pepper and white pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 375 F. Combine cream, shallots and sage in large saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside to cool slightly. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Brown bread crumbs (about 2 minutes) then transfer to a bowl to cool. Stir in parsley. Arrange equal mix of of vegetables in the buttered baking dish (13×9 or larger). Then add 1 cup of cubed white cheddar. Arrange remaining vegetables over the first layer. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese. Pour cream mixture evenly over the vegetables. Cover the pan with foil and bake for 50 to 60 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Remove foil from casserole; sprinkle evenly with toasted bread crumbs. Bake uncovered 15 minutes or until bread crumbs are browned.