2018: Week 13, August 19 – 25

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #13
Aug.19-25, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares. If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

GENOVESE BASIL: As usual all shares will receive basil this week once again, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

GREEN or PURPLE BEANS: You will receive Cosmos (fancy, dark green bean with superior eating quality) or Royal Burgundy (brilliant purple, smooth, round, meaty pods; add stunning color to salads when used raw; pods turn dark green when cooked; excellent fresh or frozen). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH SHELLING BEANS (Tongue of Fire): Italian heirloom shelling beans are round, ivory-tan with red streaks in stringless, red-streaked cream/green pods (you will need to shell them to eat the beans, not the pods); nutty flavor and creamy texture when cooked; can be substituted in recipes calling for Cannellini, Great Northern, or Pinto beans; contain a fair source of vitamins A and C.
-How to use: fresh, shelled beans are good in soups, stews, and casseroles, but also delicious simply boiled until tender, and served with a little butter or olive oil, salt/pepper or herbs.
-How to store: refrigerate fresh beans in a tightly covered container for up to 5 days.

CARROTS (Mokum): a very sweet, slender, “pencil carrot” with edible green leaves. Greens are delicious in soups and also salads.
See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Potawatomi): yellow kernels with excellent sweet flavor. Corn is often referred to as maize and is an ancient staple food of the Americas; everything on the corn plant can be used: “husks” for Tamales, the “silk” for medicinal tea, the “kernels” for food, and the “stalks” for fodder; contains a significant amount of vitamin A, B-complex, phosphorous and potassium along with vegetable protein. * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some earworms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.
-How to use: ears of corn can be steamed in 1-2 inches of water for 6-10 minutes, or drop ears into boiling water (enough to cover) for 4-7 minutes; ears of corn can also be roasted unhusked in the oven or outside grill for about 20 minutes.
-How to store: refrigerate with husks on, and use as soon as possible to retain sweetness and flavor.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

EGGPLANT: you will receive Nadia (slender, purplish-black, glossy-like, bell-shaped fruit), Rosa Biana (an Italian heirloom; round fruit streaked with white and violet), or Orient Express (dark purple Asian type with long, slender, glossy fruits, which are tender, delicately flavored, and quick cooking).
-How to use: may be salted to remove bitterness from old fruit, but also makes it less watery and more absorbent, and can greatly enhance the taste and texture of your dish; can be baked, boiled, fried, grilled, or can be sliced into rounds for grilling or broiling, and cut into cubes for stews and stir-fries; lots of recipes and basic cooking tips in the A to Z Cookbook.
-How to store: best fresh, but can be stored at room temperature or in refrigerator drawer for up to 1 week.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm): Every summer we plant a variety of flowers for drying or fresh bouquets. We welcome you to the farm to pick your flowers on any day of the week, but please contact us if it will be on other days besides Wednesdays and Fridays, so we can make sure to be around to show you where to go. This week you can pick up to 16 stems. You may want to bring a vase/jar to keep your flowers fresh going home, but we will have donated yogurt containers to fill with water as well. Your bouquet is part of your share, although you may always feel free to make a donation to pay for seeds, if you like. Extra bouquets cost $4/bunch.

NO SMALL HERB BUNCH THIS WEEK! Most of our herbs are taking longer to grow back, so we are letting our smaller patches of herbs recuperate, but you will receive Genovese Basil.

KALE : You will receive Rainbow Lacinato Kale (unique “purple dino” kale has deeply curled leaves in dusky-green with bright purple stems and veins) or Red Curly Kale (well ruffled green leaves with red stems; great in kale chips) See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ONIONS: You will receive Ailsa Craig Exhibition (a huge, sweet, mild, yellow-skinned, heirloom onion that is well known by British gardeners who grow show-size onions) or Red Long of Tropea (specialty variety of tall, elongated, red bulbs traditionally grown in Mediterranean Italy and France). See Week 10 for usage and storage tips.

POTATOES: You will receive Kerr’s Pink (very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads) and Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting; perfect baked, boiled, mashed or fried). See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive a mixed quart of Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), and Clementine (tangerine-colored, oval-round fruits; appealing, sweet-tart flavor. Exceptional when halved and roasted!). You will also receive a variety of slicing tomato, which may be Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are very large, firm, nice red color and good taste), Japanese Black Trifele (unusual pear-shaped, heirloom tomato with burgundy, greenish color and excellent, rich flavor), Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) OR Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ZUCCHINI: You will receive some variety of Green or Yellow Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits and some with attractive white stripes). See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. TOMATO PRESERVING WORKSHOP on Sept. 9: This workshop is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 9 from 1 to 4 PM. Former Tantre intern, Noelle Dronen, will teach mostly how to can tomatoes, but also some information will be on dehydrating and freezing them. There will be active participation and “take-home” samples for those attending. Plan on bringing a Quart Size Canning Jar. Please register with your Name, Phone Number, and E-mail Address in the body of the email to us. There will be a small $5 fee for materials. Bulk tomatoes will be available for you to buy. This is a great time for canning, freezing, or dehydrating!

2. TANTRE STALL MOVED AT ANN ARBOR FARMERS MARKET: Every August the market holds what is called a “Stall Move Up” day for vendors at the market, so those folks with more seniority can change their permanent stall location, if they like. Our market stall got moved around a little bit, so if you need us we are further down the sidewalk. You can always find us on the market map near the office door, if you’re having trouble locating our table. The Wed. and Sat. Farmers Market CSA distribution should still be on 4th Avenue though.

3. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED in the HERB GARDEN, KID GARDEN, & FLOWER GARDEN: If you are interested in helping out, please contact us any day of the week or evenings until dark. Thanks so much to all those, who have helped out so far!

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 AM to 7 PM
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
NEW! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

RECIPES
**Keep in mind a very easy way to find recipe ideas for almost any combination of share box ingredients is to type the items into your preferred “search bar”, and many recipe ideas will pop up.

EIGHT GREAT WAYS TO SERVE SUMMER TOMATOES (Capay Organic Farm CSA “Farm Fresh To You” website)
1. Cut tomatoes into wedges. Toss with finely chopped shallots, then splash with lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil.
2. Cut tomatoes in half lengthwise. Remove center of each, and fill with a large basil leaf and a chunk of fresh mozzarella cheese. Drizzle with purchased garlic-infused oil, and wrap in foil. Roast on an outdoor grill for five minutes.
3. Cut tomatoes in wedges. Shower with grated Parmesan cheese. Top with fresh oregano and a drizzle of olive oil.
4. Cut tomatoes into chunks, and place in blender. Add a pinch of sea salt, a few fresh basil leaves and several ice cubes. Blend until smooth and frothy for a refreshing drink.
5. Cube tomatoes and firm ricotta salt or feta cheese. Toss with cooked orzo (rice-shaped pasta), fresh mint and a favorite vinaigrette.
6. For bruschetta, top grilled Italian bread with a mixture of chopped tomatoes, minced garlic, extra- virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
7. Toss arugula with chopped tomatoes, orange segments, basil and toasted pine nuts. Dress with olive oil, orange juice and a splash of wine vine
8. Slather a thick slice of bread with good mayonnaise. Cover with thick slices of juicy tomatoes. Sprinkle with coarse salt and Szechuan pepper or some cracked mixed peppercorns. Add some fresh mozzarella cheese slices. Mmmmmm!!!

GREEN BEANS WITH TOMATOES AND BASIL (from From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce by MACSAC) Serves 4-6
1 1/2 lbs green beans, cooked
1 garlic clove, diced
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 tomatoes (or several cherry tomatoes), and coarsely chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 Tbsp chopped fresh basil or 1 tsp of dried basil
1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley or 1 tsp of dried parsley
Cut beans into 1-inch lengths; set aside. Saute garlic and onion in oil in skillet until soft. Add tomatoes, salt and pepper and cook 2 minutes. Stir in basil and green beans. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer 3 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in parsley, and serve immediately.

COUSCOUS WITH TOMATO EGGPLANT SAUCE (from Farm-Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure) Serves 6
1 medium onion, chopped
1 tsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 eggplant, skin on, diced
1 green pepper, cut julienne
2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
Salt and black pepper, to taste
1/4 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp dry or ½ tsp fresh basil, rosemary, and oregano
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
1 cup water
1 lb couscous
Cook onion until golden in olive oil in skillet over medium-high heat, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook about 1 minute. Add eggplant and green pepper; cook and stir 10 minutes. Add tomatoes, salt, pepper, paprika, herbs, and water; stir. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer 30 minutes, stirring often. Mash eggplant, then cook 30 minutes more. Cook couscous according to package directions. Serve sauce over hot couscous.