2018: Week 12, August 12 – 18

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #12
Aug.12-18, 2018

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares. If you are new to our CSA, since you signed up with a prorated share, you can find all past newsletters on our website under the NEWSLETTERS tab.

In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

ARUGULA (Sylvetta): also known as “wild rocket” with more deeply lobed leaves and a more pungent flavor; an aromatic, bright salad green with a peppery mustard flavor. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GENOVESE BASIL: As usual all shares will receive basil this week, an herb with sweet, spicy, shiny, green leaves. We supply it with root attached, so it will last up to a week or 2 when stored in a jar, vase, or glass of water on your counter or table top. Do NOT refrigerate!

GREEN or PUPRLE BEANS: You will receive Cosmos (fancy, dark green bean with superior eating quality) or Royal Burgundy (brilliant purple, smooth, round, meaty pods; add stunning color to salads when used raw; pods turn dark green when cooked; excellent fresh or frozen). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

BROCCOLI: deep emerald green, tiny buds that are clustered on top of stout, edible stems; high in vitamins A, C, calcium, potassium, and iron; known as an anti-cancer vegetable. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CARROTS (Mokum): a very sweet, slender, “pencil carrot” with edible green leaves. Greens are delicious in soups and also salads. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Potawatomi): yellow kernels with excellent sweet flavor. Corn is often referred to as maize and is an ancient staple food of the Americas; everything on the corn plant can be used: “husks” for Tamales, the “silk” for medicinal tea, the “kernels” for food, and the “stalks” for fodder; contains a significant amount of vitamin A, B-complex, phosphorous and potassium along with vegetable protein. * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some earworms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.
-How to use: ears of corn can be steamed in 1-2 inches of water for 6-10 minutes, or drop ears into boiling water (enough to cover) for 4-7 minutes; ears of corn can also be roasted unhusked in the oven or outside grill for about 20 minutes.
-How to store: refrigerate with husks on, and use as soon as possible to retain sweetness and flavor.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

U-PICK FLOWERS (only available on the farm): Every summer we plant a variety of flowers for drying or fresh bouquets. We welcome you to the farm to pick your flowers on any day of the week, but please contact us if it will be on other days besides Wednesdays and Fridays, so we can make sure to be around to show you where to go. This week you can pick up to 16 stems. You may want to bring a vase/jar to keep your flowers fresh going home, but we will have donated yogurt containers to fill with water as well. Your bouquet is part of your share, although you may always feel free to make a donation to pay for seeds, if you like. Extra bouquets cost $4/bunch.

KALE (Green Curly): well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”. See Week 4 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET ONIONS (Ailsa Craig Exhibition): a huge, sweet, mild, yellow-skinned, heirloom onion that is well known by British gardeners who grow show-size onions. See Week 10 for usage and storage tips.

PARSLEY: You will choose either “Curly” or “Flat Leaf”, which can both be used interchangeably; dark green leaves with a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces. Store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.

POTATOES (Kerr’s Pink): very pale skin and cream flesh; mealy, cooked texture, so makes a good specialty/salad potato variety; good roasted, mashed, or in salads. See Week 7 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

TOMATOES: You will receive a mixed quart of Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads), Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), and Clementine (tangerine-colored, oval-round fruits; appealing, sweet-tart flavor. Exceptional when halved and roasted!). You will also receive a slicing tomato, which may be Geronimo (newer variety but already one of the most widely used beefsteak varieties; fruits are very large, firm, nice red color and good taste), OR Brandywine (large, heirloom, beefsteak tomato–often over 1 lb–with a deep pink skin and smooth red flesh; known as one of the best-tasting tomatoes) OR Green Zebra (ripe as a green fruit with a yellow blush and darker green stripes; delicious, tangy salad tomato; beautiful sliced into wedges for salads). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Little Baby Flower (small, 2-4 lb. round fruit; bright green stripe pattern on shell and dark pink flesh that is sweet and crisp with a high sugar count), Sunshine (8-10 pound oval-rounded fruit; green-striped shell with bright yellow flesh, which is brittle, juicy, and very sweet), or Dark Bell (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor). See Week 11 for usage and storage tips.

ZUCCHINI: You will receive some variety of Green or Yellow Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits and some with attractive white stripes). See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. 2nd ANNUAL AGRARIAN ADVENTURE FARM TOUR FUNDRAISER at Black Locust Gardens on Aug. 19 from 4-7 PM: Tantre Farm will be donating produce to this Agrarian Adventure (www.agrarianadventur.org) event. Get your tickets now for an evening of local flavors and hand crafted cocktails! Food and drink will be prepared by Jude Walser (Alley Bar), Chris Chiapelli(Black Pearl, Ross School of Business) and Chris Huey (Brecon Grille & Pub). Money raised will support educational programs that enrich K-12 student connections with food, community and health. Deb has been on the Agrarian Adventure (TAA) board for 8 years now working with schools and students through the Farmer in the Classroom program. Please come out and support this worthy cause and have fun at a beautiful farm. Hope to see you there!! Ticket purchases and donations with a sliding scale can be made at http://agrarianadventure.org.

2. STILL SPACES left for KID FARM DAY on Wed., Aug. 22, from 9 AM until noon. This half-day will be for all kids who are 4 years old and older. Activities will include an edible farm walk, a nature craft to take home, and a fun movement activity! Snacks harvested from the farm will be included. Advance registration is required due to limited space and there will be a small fee for materials, which is still being finalized. Please register by e-mail with KID FARM DAY in the Subject Line with NAMES AND AGES of KIDS, NAME OF ADULT attending, PHONE NUMBER, and E-MAIL ADDRESS. Anyone interested in helping out on Kid Farm Day, let us know.

3. WEEDING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: If you are interested in helping out, please contact us any day of the week or evening.

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) (limited site) –9 AM to 7 PM
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.
NEW! Argus-Packard (Sat) (limited site)–10 A.M. To 12 P.M.

CORN LOVERS OF ALL SIZES
We are sure you’ve been waiting impatiently as we have for our first bite of corn. This cold weather has kept this high summer crop slow growing, but it is finally ready. As we introduce you to your first ear of Tantre corn, we would be remiss if we forgot about our yearly introductions to two fellow corn lovers: the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) and the Corn Earworm (Heliothis zea), which you may have encountered already.
The European corn borer has been a resident of the U.S. since the early 1900s. The larvae are grayish-pink caterpillars with dark heads and spots on the top of each segment about 1 inch long. They chew on leaves and tassels of corn, but especially favor the tasty insides of stalks and ears. It is not partial to corn though, since it has been recorded on 200 different plants, including beans, celery, beets, and potatoes. Despite the fact that we hear much about the corn borer, the earworm is probably the worst pest of corn. It is said that American farmers grow two million acres of corn a year just to feed it. The color of the larvae varies from white to green and even red. They have four pairs of prolegs, are spined, and 1-1/2 inches long. These voracious eaters enter corn ears at the tip and work their way to the kernels.
If you are “lucky” enough to encounter one of these guests in your ear of corn this week, don’t throw the ear away, just break off the offensive part and cook the rest. We are “pleased” to introduce you to these smaller relatives who share your taste for corn.

RECIPES

GOLDEN ZUCCHINI & CORN SOUP (from Eatingwell.com)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium shallot (or onion), chopped
2 medium zucchini, (about 1 pound), diced
3 teaspoons chopped fresh herbs (parsley), divided
2 cups chicken broth, or vegetable broth
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup fresh corn kernels
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add shallot and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add squash and 1 teaspoon herbs and cook, stirring occasionally, until the squash starts to soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Add broth and salt; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook until the squash is soft and mostly translucent, about 5 minutes more. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. (Use caution when pureeing hot liquids.) Return the soup to the pan and stir in corn. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender, 3 to 5 minutes more. Remove from the heat; stir in lemon juice. Serve garnished with the remaining 2 teaspoons herbs and feta.

ITALIAN PARSLEY AND ARUGULA SALAD WITH MUSHROOMS
1 cup parsley leaves, loosely packed, washed,spun dry
1 cup arugula, loosely packed, washed, spun dry
3 firm white cultivated mushrooms, sliced thin
Dash salt
1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1/4 cup thinly-sliced sweet onions, soaked in ice water 15 minutes, drained
Parmesan cheese, shaved in thin curls
In a large bowl toss the parsley, arugula and mushrooms with the salt. Add the oil and toss well. Add the lemon juice and toss well. Season to taste with the black pepper. Divide the salad among plates and add to each portion some of the onions and Parmesan curls.

GARLIC-BASIL CORN ON THE COB
Combine 2 tablespoons butter (softened), 1 tablespoon basil, and 1 garlic clove (minced) in a small bowl. Place 4 ears of corn into a large saucepan of boiling water; cook 4 minutes. Drain. Spoon 1 teaspoon butter mixture over each ear of corn. Delicious!!