2017: Week 11, August 6-12

Tantre Farm CSA Newsletter
WEEK #11
Aug. 6-12, 2017

If needed, please contact Richard Andres & Deb Lentz at 2510 Hayes Rd. Chelsea, MI 48118 e-mail: tantrefarm@hotmail.com phone: 734-475-4323 website: www.tantrefarm.com.
In our newsletter, we try to give you an accurate listing of the produce in your box; however, since the newsletter is published before the harvest, we may sometimes substitute some vegetables for others. The information provided here is also published each week on our website. **Also, if you’re having trouble identifying any unfamiliar produce, please look for “Veggie ID” with additional information on our website under CSA INFO or under RECIPES.

We try to keep the printed newsletter to a 2-page maximum, which means that we won’t list all the share items’ descriptions every week, but refer you to previous newsletters for information on items that have already appeared in your shares.

THIS WEEK’S SHARE

BLACKBERRIES: plump, purplish-black fruits that grow on brambles–ours is a thornless variety; largest of all berries, the blackberries are tiny fruits clustered together around a core, which are juicy and have a sweet-sour flavor. Freeze by tossing them in a ziplock bag for smoothies, jams, pies, or sauces during the winter. See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET CORN (Vision): exceptionally tender, super sweet, yellow ears; great for fresh eating and freezing; corn is often referred to as maize and is an ancient staple food of the Americas; everything on the corn plant can be used: “husks” for Tamales, the “silk” for medicinal tea, the “kernels” for food, and the “stalks” for fodder; contains a significant amount of vitamin A, B-complex, phosphorous and potassium along with vegetable protein. * We don’t treat our corn with pesticides, so you may find some earworms enjoying the corn too; just break off the damaged part and cook the rest of the ear.
-How to use: ears of corn can be steamed in 1-2 inches of water for 6-10 minutes, or drop ears into boiling water (enough to cover) for 4-7 minutes; ears of corn can also be roasted unhusked in the oven or outside grill for about 20 minutes.
-How to store: refrigerate with husks on, and use as soon as possible to retain sweetness and flavor.

CUCUMBERS: long, cylindrical, green-skinned fruit of the gourd family with mild, crisp flesh. Lots of cucumbers this week, so see “Recipes”. See Week 6 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

GARLIC: a bulb of several papery white cloves; believed to help in fighting infections, cancer prevention, and bolstering the immune system. See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

FRESH HERBS: In general, store herbs upright with cut stems in 1 or 2 inches of water and refrigerate for up to 1 week or wrap in slightly dampened cloth or plastic bag and store in refrigerator.

You may CHOOSE ONE bunch (NOT one bunch of each) from the following 6 options:
1. Anise Hyssop: catnip-like, soft, sweet, anise-scented leaves are used as a seasoning, as a delicious licorice-flavored tea, and in potpourri; the purple flower spike is favored by bees, who make a light fragrant honey from the nectar; it was used medicinally by Native Americans for coughs, fevers, wounds, and diarrhea.
2. Marjoram: a small and oval-shaped leaf, which is light green with a grayish tint. When fresh it is spicy, bitter, and slightly pungent with camphor-like notes, so often added to fish sauces, salads and dressings, tomato-based sauces, grilled lamb and other meats; goes well with vegetables including cabbages, potatoes, eggplant, and beans. It is usually added at the end of cooking to retain its delicate flavor or as a garnish. Traditionally, it was used in tea to cure headaches, head colds, calm nervous disorders, and to clear sinuses.
3. Italian Flat-leaf Parsley: flat, glossy, dark green leaves have a strong parsley/celery flavor for use dried or fresh; high in vitamins A and C, and other minerals, such as iron; especially good in omelets, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, pasta and vegetable dishes, as well as, sauces to go with meat dishes.
4. Sage–an herb from an evergreen shrub in the mint family with long, narrow, grayish-green leaves; a musky aroma and a warm and spicy taste; used in making sausages, stews, breads, pickles and teas. The flowers are edible and make nice garnishes and can be infused into a delicious vinaigrette!
5. Lemon Balm– these fragrant lemon-minty leaves make a delicate herbal tea, served hot or cold, and helps with depression, tension, or nausea; good addition to lettuce/fruit salads and ice cream; pairs well with fish, lamb, & tossed with steamed vegetables.
6. Winter Savory: is a semi-evergreen, perennial herb; its strong spicy flavor goes well with beans and meat; medicinally it has antiseptic, aromatic, carminative, and digestive benefits, as well as relieves bee stings; fresh savory has a strong spicy-peppery flavor and resinous odor similar to fresh thyme; prior to widespread European use of long pepper and black pepper, savory filled a similar role in European cuisine.

KALE (Green Curly): well-ruffled, curly green leaves on green stems; this variety makes a good, roasted “kale chip”. See Week 2 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

LETTUCE: You will receive lettuce, which may include Green or Red Leaf or Romaine. See Week 1 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SWEET ONIONS (Walla Walla): sweet, mild, juicy, yellow-skinned; nice as a “green top” onion; not for storage
-How to use: great for salads, soups, sandwiches, slices, onion rings, and other dishes for flavor.
-How to store: not for long storage; wrap in damp towel or plastic bag in fridge for 2-7 days.

PEACHES or PEARS: Since there are not enough specific varieties of fruit for the whole week, Wednesday CSA members will receive Red Haven Peaches (an early, rosy-orange skinned peach with firm, creamy yellow flesh; some peaches may be a little firm, but will continue to ripen after they are picked. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.) and Friday/Saturday CSA members will receive Red Clapp’s Pears (one of the first fresh-eating pears on the market; very red fruit; medium to large size, sweet, fine-grained with very white flesh and excellent flavor similar to a Bartlett, but more firm; ripening can occur either at room temperature or in the refrigerator).

POTATOES: You will receive Yukon Gold (yellowish brown skin with yellow dry flesh and pink eyes; long storage and good tasting. See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

SUMMER SQUASH/ZUCCHINI: You will receive some variety of Green or Yellow Zucchini (gourmet golden or green zucchini with uniform, cylindrical fruits) or Yellow Crookneck (long, curved neck with a sometimes bumpy, yellow skin; buttery flavor and firm texture). See Week 5 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

CHERRY TOMATOES: You will receive some of the following kinds of cherry tomatoes depending on your distribution site options: Sakura (bright-red, shiny, medium-large cherry tomato with real sweet tomato flavor and firmness without being hard) or Sun Gold Cherry (exceptionally sweet, bright tangerine-orange cherry tomato; less acidic than the red cherry tomato, so slightly less bland in flavor; popular as a garnish, in salads, or as a cooked side dish that can be sautéed with herbs), or Mountain Magic (bright red, round tomatoes with very sweet flavor; excellent in salads). See Week 9 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

WATERMELON: You will receive Little Baby Flower (small, 2-4 lb. round fruit; bright green stripe pattern on shell and dark pink flesh that is sweet and crisp with a high sugar count) or Dark Bell (dark-green skin, bright-red flesh, oblong 5-7 lb. fruit with thin rind, and very sweet flavor). See Week 10 newsletter for usage and storage tips.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. ALINA’s COOKING CLASS on Thurs. Aug. 24 from 6 to 8:30 PM: We are offering another cooking class with CSA members, Alina and Michael Makin, at the end of August to show other ways to use up produce from your share box and make a healthy and tasty meal to share. More details to come. Please register by email with your NAME, EMAIL ADDRESS, and PHONE NUMBER. $5 fee for materials and other ingredients.

2. KID FARM DAY will be on Wed., Aug. 23, from 9 AM until noon. This half-day will be for all kids who are 4 years old and older. Activities will include an edible farm walk, a nature craft to take home, and a fun movement activity! Snacks harvested from the farm will be included. Advance registration is required due to limited space. We may provide t-shirts, so are asking for a small fee of around $10/child, but will finalize this as the date gets closer. Please register by e-mail to info@tantrefarm.com with names and ages of children, name of adult attending, phone number, and e-mail address. Anyone interested in helping out, please contact Deb.

3. U-PICK AVAILABLE: Please call ahead if you plan to pick on other days besides Farm Distribution Days (Wed. and Fri.), so we can make sure someone is around to help you.
-Blackberries–$4/pint for members and $5/pint nonmembers.

4. PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS REMINDER:
Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market (Wed.)–7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
MOVE Fitness & Wellness Studio (Wed)—8 AM to 12 PM
Farm (Wed.)–10 A.M. to 7 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Wed.) –6 P.M. to 8 P.M.
Pure Pastures (Wed.) –9 A.M. To 7 P.M.
Farm (Fri.)–2 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Community High School (Sat.) –7 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Washtenaw Food Hub (Sat.)—9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Chelsea Farmers’ Market (Sat.)–8 A.M. to 12 P.M.

CORN LOVERS OF ALL SIZES
We are sure you’ve been waiting impatiently as we have for our first bite of corn. This cold weather has kept this high summer crop slow growing, but it is finally ready. As we introduce you to your first ear of Tantre corn, we would be remiss if we forgot about our yearly introductions to two fellow corn lovers: the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) and the Corn Earworm (Heliothis zea), which you may have encountered already.

The European corn borer has been a resident of the U.S. since the early 1900s. The larvae are grayish-pink caterpillars with dark heads and spots on the top of each segment about 1 inch long. They chew on leaves and tassels of corn, but especially favor the tasty insides of stalks and ears. It is not partial to corn though, since it has been recorded on 200 different plants, including beans, celery, beets, and potatoes.

Despite the fact that we hear much about the corn borer, the earworm is probably the worst pest of corn. It is said that American farmers grow two million acres of corn a year just to feed it. The color of the larvae varies from white to green and even red. They have four pairs of prolegs, are spined, and 1-1/2 inches long. These voracious eaters enter corn ears at the tip and work their way to the kernels.

If you are “lucky” enough to encounter one of these guests in your ear of corn this week, don’t throw the ear away, just break off the offensive part and cook the rest. We are “pleased” to introduce you to these smaller relatives who share your taste for corn.

RECIPES

TABBOULI (The World in Your Kitchen)
1/2 c. bulgur
a few lettuce leaves
4 Tbs. chopped fresh parsley, divided
2 Tbs. chopped fresh mint
1 onion, finely sliced
4 tomatoes, chopped
1 cucumber, chopped
4 Tbs. lemon juice
4 Tbs. olive oil
salt & pepper to taste

Soak bulgur 20-30 minutes in cold water to cover. Drain well. Line a salad bowl with lettuce leaves and spoon in bulgur. Mix in 3 tablespoons of the parsley, mint, onion, and tomatoes. Whisk lemon juice with olive oil, salt and pepper; toss with salad. Sprinkle remaining tablespoon of parsley on top. Serves 4-6.

GOLDEN SUMMER SQUASH & CORN SOUP (from Eatingwell.com)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium shallot (or onion), chopped
2 medium summer squash, (about 1 pound), diced
3 teaspoons chopped fresh herbs, divided
2 cups chicken broth, or vegetable broth
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup fresh corn kernels
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add shallot and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add squash and 1 teaspoon herbs and cook, stirring occasionally, until the squash starts to soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Add broth and salt; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook until the squash is soft and mostly translucent, about 5 minutes more. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. (Use caution when pureeing hot liquids.) Return the soup to the pan and stir in corn. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender, 3 to 5 minutes more. Remove from the heat; stir in lemon juice. Serve garnished with the remaining 2 teaspoons herbs and feta.